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I have the honor of transmitting, herewith enclosed, the copy of Mr V. Berckel’s credentials which I received from him together with a translation of them. Be pleased to name the hour at which you may think proper to receive him, and I will give him notice of it and accompany him—if to-morrow permit me to observe that some hour previous to the levee will be most proper. With perfect respect...
I have at length, my dear Sir, the pleasure of informing you (tho’ not officially) that you have Leave to return, and that Mr. Short is appointed to take charge of the public affairs during your absence. From the Time that your Letter of the 19th. November last was received, Vizt. 10th. February, to the Time that our former Government gave place to the present one, there was not a single Day...
Mr Jay has the honor of transmitting herewith enclosed to the President of the United States, a memorial and a translation of it, from the Marquis de Lotbiniere, a respectable Canadian now here in very indigent circumstances, and who says, with great appearance of truth, that his attachment to the american cause has rendered him so obnoxious to the british government as to render it...
Mr Jay has the Honor of observing to the President, on the Subject of Capt. Tate’s application, That in his opinion no Papers should be given to that Gentleman, from which it might appear, or be inferred, that the Governmt encouraged him going into the Service of the Porte, lest umbrage be given to Russia, and Suspicions of ulterior views excited—that therefore the Idea of giving him only a...
Mr Jay has the honor of informing the President of the United States, that yesterday afternoon he received a letter from Sir John Temple in the following words, vizt “New York 12th of October 1789, Sir. I beg leave to submit in the most respectful manner, the enclosed memorial to the consideration of the Government of the United States. The memorialist informs me he hath in his possession all...
A few days since I received a Letter from Mr. Jefferson, dated at Cowes in the Isle of Wight the 17th. October last, in which he mentioned that he expected to sail from that Place the next Day in a Vessel bound to the Chesapeake, and enclosed a Bill of Lading, a Copy of which I have the Pleasure of herewith sending to you. In case the Packages mentioned in the said Bill of Lading, arrive...
It gives me great Pleasure to address a Letter to you in our own country. Being informed of your having sailed, the Storm a few weeks ago rendered us apprehensive that you might be at least embarrassed on the coast.—I congratulate you very sincerely on your arrival, and join in the general wish that you may consent to remain among us, in the Station to which during your absence and without...
The bearer will herewith deliver to you a Book of accounts transmitted to me by Mr. Jefferson, and which in my opinion should be deposited in your office. With great esteem and regard &c. LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. An asterisk was placed at this point and the words “of Silas Deane” inserted as a footnote. Deane was one of the congressional agents sent to France...
I have now the honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed the extracts requested in your letter to me of the 2d. November last, and am with great respect and esteem &c. LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. At the bottom of this letter is the following: “List of papers mentioned in, and transmitted with the aforegoing letter. No. 1. Abstracts and Extracts from the...
There does not appear to be a single Circumstance in the Case of the murderer in question, to recommend a Pardon—His own Petition contains no averment of Innocence, no Palliative for Guilt, no complaint of Court Jury or witnesses, nor of the want of witnesses. The Silence of the british cabinet on the Subject of Mr Morris’s Letters marks their Indicision —it may arise from Doubts of what might...