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I have the honor to inform you, that a letter, of which a copy is enclosed, has come to my hands from the Loan officer of North Carolina, since the date of my last letter. On considering minutely the course of the business of the new Loans and the future operations of the Treasury, as they will affect the public stocks, it appeared necessary to the prevention of frauds by Counterfeiters and...
The Secry of the Treasury presents his respects to The President. He finds it will be impracticable for him without injury to the public service to leave town on Monday , but he will do it the day after & overtake the President. However he begs leave to inform the President that from the information received, there is no prospect of a pretty general assembling of the Pennsylvania & N. Jersey...
The circumstance of having offered my late report to Congress to the two houses which rendered two copies necessary & the extreme press of business in the office in preparing for my resignation prevented my sending you a manuscript copy of that Report. I have now corrected a printed copy for you which I have the honor to send herewith. With true respect & attacht I have the honor to be Sir Yr...
Since I did myself the honor to address you on the fourth instant, another letter from the Commissioner of Loans for the State of North Carolina has been received, of which a copy will be found in this inclosure. From this last communication it appears, that he is disposed to make an experiment of the office, which, I beg leave to observe, is a pleasing circumstance, both as it insures the...
About a fortnight since arrived here Mr. Fristel with G W. Fayette son of the Marquis. The former, who is in capacity of Tutor to the latter, requested me to mention their arrival to you, and that they meant to retire to some place in the neighbouring country ’till they should receive some direction from you. Thus at least I understood him—and accordingly they are gone to a house between...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to transmit herewith for the President’s signature, the draft of a passport upon application from the French Minister, which is also enclosed. LB , DLC:GW . On this date GW "Signed a passport for the vessel L’aimable of port de paix (St. Domingo) now at Phila. to depart in ballast & to proceed to sd. Island" ( JPP Dorothy Twohig, ed. The Journal of...
The Secretary of the Treasury upon two Letters from the Minister plenipotentiary of France to the Secy of State severally bearing date the 11. & 14 of November inst. respectfully reports to the President of the United States as follows. 1. The object of these Letters is to procure an engagement that the bills which the Minister may draw upon the sums, which according to the terms of the...
June 12. 1793. The President having required the opinions of the heads of the three departments on a letter from Governor Clinton of the 9th. inst. stating that he had taken possession of the sloop Polly, now called the Republican, which was arming, equipping and manning by French and other citizens to cruize against some of the belligerent powers, and desiring to know what further was to be...
It gives me great pleasure to have the opportunity of announcing to you one whom I know to be so interesting to You as the bearer of this Mr. Motier La Fayette. I allow myself to share by anticipation the satisfaction which the Meeting will afford to all the parties—the more, as I am persuased, that time will confirm the favourable representation I have made of the person & justify the...
Mr Chew having confirmed the character received by you, of Mr Barratt, I have written to Mr Vining requesting him to ascertain whether the appointment will be acceptable to him. Mr Houston of Georgia declines the offer made to him, on the score of want of a familiar acquaintance with figures, and its being inconsistent with the State of his affairs, to translate himself wholly to the seat of...
A law having passed to inable the President to cause a loan to be made in aid of the current receipts from the Public revenues, it is urgent that measures should be taken without delay for carrying it into effect. The enclosed statement shews the probable situation of the Treasury to the end of the ensuing quarter as far as materials are now possessed and manifests the necessity of an...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to transmit to the President of the United States a Contract made by the Collector of Portsmouth in New Hampshire with Titus Salter for furnishing the Light house on New Castle Island with oil, wick, fuel & candles, and for the care & lighting of the same from the 15th. day of August 1789. to the 1st. day of July next, including some...
In conformity to the intimation you were pleased to honor me with on evening last I have reflected on the etiquette proper to be observed by the President and now submit the ideas which have occurred to me on the subject. The public good requires as a primary object that the dignity of the office should be supported. Whatever is essential to this ought to be pursued though at the risk of...
The Attorney for the District of Virginia has presented to the accounting officers of the Treasury Department, a claim against the United States for his services in attending at Norfolk by direction from the Secy. of State, in order to take depositions respecting a british vessel alledged to have been taken by a french privateer within the limits of the United States; which claim has been...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President of the United States & encloses the drafts of two passports for the President’s signature. One for the Schooner Commerce, now in this Port; and the other for the Schooner Eagle at Baltimore. Colo. Smith of Baltimore has applied, thro’ the Secry of State, for a Passport for a small vessel (name & Captain not known) to be sent...
[ Philadelphia, May 1, 1792 . On May 2, 1792, Hamilton wrote to Washington: “The case was here before the Secretary’s letter of yesterday was sent to the President.” Letter not found. ]
I am not willing to give a pretext for not doing us justice by the appearance of carelessness or indifference as to the fulfilment of our engagements. I continue to think that the idea of a special instruction to Mr Jay is proper, because it is an evidence of our being in earnest, because as Mr. Jay’s mission was produced by circumstances subsequent to the communication to Congress, that...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to The President—incloses him a letter which Mister Coxe has just brought to him for his perusal. It is conceived that a reply may be given to this Letter, by Mister Coxe, which being published with the letter, may do good. If the President sees no objection, the idea will be pursued. Augt 15. 1794. It is said that papers have been received...
The Secy of the Treasury presents his respects to the President of the U.S. & encloses herewith the draft of a Passport, requested by mister Hammond for a vessel intended by him to be dispatched to Halifax, and which the Secretary understood from the Secy of State was to be granted by the President. LB , DLC:GW . For the request for a passport by British minister George Hammond “for the sole...
For a considerable time past the Commissioner of Loans for New York, has laboured under a degree of bodily infirmity little suited to the arduous duties of his station. A belief that his demise would speedily have terminated the embarrassment, united with other considerations, has hitherto prevented me from officially representing his situation to you, & the possible inconvenience to the...
I do myself the honor to inform you, that the result of my enquiries concerning the character of Capt: Jonathan Maltbee, is, that he is a man of fair character and an experienced & good Seaman, who might be expected to execute his duty faithfully as the Commander of a revenue Cutter. I do not learn however, that either he or Capt. Law are remarkable for their activity. The principal point of...
I found young La Fayette here and delivered him your letter, which much releived him. I fancy you will see him on the first day of April. Mr Livingston’s motion in the House of Representatives concerning the production of papers has attracted much attention —The opinion here of those who think is that if the motion succeeds, it ought not to be complied with—Besides that in a matter of such a...
Treasury Department, January 4, 1793. Submits to the President two communications from Tench Coxe “suggesting certain alterations in the arrangement heretofore made, within the Revenue, District of North Carolina.” Proposes minor changes. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See Coxe to H, December 13 , 21, 1792 .
That The Minister of the French Republic be informed that the President considers the U. States as bound pursuant to positive assurances, given in conformity to the laws of neutrality, to effectuate the restoration of, or to make compensation for, prizes which shall have been made of any of the parties at war with France subsequent to the fifth day of June last by privateers fitted out of...
Treasury Department, December 23, 1790. Discusses qualifications of various candidates who have been recommended for the appointment as “Keeper for the Light-house at Portland in the District of Maine.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to The President & encloses the draft of a passport for the vessel of Mr. Fitzsimons which he understands the President had agreed to give. Mr Fitzsimons states that there will be on board, 8 barrels bread, 3 bbls Beef, 1 bbl pork & 1 barrel hams. All the articles but the last are understood to be intended for the subsistence of such of our...
I have the pleasure of your private letter of the 26th of August. The feelings and views which are manifested in that letter are such as I expected would exist. And I most sincerely regret the cause of the uneasy sensations you experience. It is my most anxious wish, as far as may depend upon me, to smooth the path of your administration, and to render it prosperous and happy. And if any...
Herewith is an official letter submitting the draft of a Proclamation. I reserve some observations as most proper for a private letter. In the case of a former proclamation I observe it was under the seal of the U. States and countersigned by the Secretary of State. If the precedent was now to be formed I should express a doubt whether it was such an instrument as ought to be under the seal of...
A conformity of opinion, and upon the same grounds, enables us to submit to you a joint Answer to the third of the Questions, which you were pleased to propose on the 18th. of April to the Heads of Departments and the Attorney General. We have concluded that this mode would be more agreeable to you than a repetition of the same ideas and arguments in seperate answers. With perfect respect &...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President and sends him the opinion required which occupied him the greatest part of last night. The Bill for extending the time of opening subscriptions passed yesterday unanimously to an order for engrossing. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. In the George Washington letter book this letter follows H’s signature on...
You will probably recollect that previous to your departure from this place, anticipating the event which has taken place with regard to the death of Mr Eveleigh, I took the liberty to mention to you that Mr. Woolcott the present Auditor would be in every respect worthy of your consideration as his successor in office. Now that the event has happened, a concern as anxious as it is natural for...
The present situation of the United States is undoubtedly critical and demands measures vigorous though prudent. We ought to be in a respectable military posture, because war may come upon us, whether we choose it or not and because to be in a condition to defend ourselves and annoy any who may attack us will be the best method of securing our peace. If it is known that our principal maritime...
Letter not found: from Alexander Hamilton, 11 July 1795. In a postscript to his letter to Hamilton on 13 July, GW wrote: “I was almost in the act of sending the enclosed letter to the Post Office when your favor of the 11th was put into my hands.”
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to The President, sends him for consideration, two letters on the subject of a proper site for a Custom House, on the New York side of Lake Champlain. The Secretary will have the honor of waiting on the President in a day or two to submit whatever further may occur & take his orders. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. These...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to send the President some additional communications from the Supervisor of Ohio District. The State of that scene renders the arrangement with regard to District Attorney delicate & important. LB , DLC:GW . On 18 Aug., during the recess of Congress, GW had commissioned Thomas Marshall to be supervisor of the revenue for the District of Ohio and also...
Mr. Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , Photostat, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have the honor to transmit herewith the Copy of a letter from the Comptroller of the Treasury of the 7th instant containing substantially the information requisite to a judgment of the motives, which determined the Treasury to persist in declining for the present the payment of the warrants stated by Mr Fraunces to be in his possession. These principally turn upon the following...
I forbear to make any comments on that violent sense of duty which at this late and critical hour has compelled the virtuous mind of Mr. Coxe to make to you the communication contained in his letter of yesterday. I shall proceed to submit to The President with candour and truth my view of the case. Towards this it will be useful to cite the expressions of the Act referred to. They are these...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President. has the honor to transmit a Memorial from Colo. Waissenfelt, which came enclosed to him. LB , DLC:GW . The enclosed memorial from Frederick Weissenfels has not been found, but it may have been a letter requesting appointment to a federal position (see Weissenfels to GW, 2 May 1789 , and notes).
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to The President of the United States—He has just ascertained that General Matthews would not accept—His son is older than was believed—29 years of age & has a family As he will have the benefit of his fathers influence which is considerable and is a young man of real merit & as the appointment of any other candidate would be subject to the...
It appears probable that advantages will result from giving to the Citizens at large information on the subject of the disturbances which exist in the Western parts of Pennsylvania. With this view, if no objection to the measure should occur to you, I would cause a publication to be made of the Report which I had the honor to address to you, dated the 5th. instant. With the most perfect...
Doctor Craigie has communicated to me, a letter from Mr. Daniel Parker to him, dated, London the 12th of July, which mentions that he had just seen Mr. De Miranda, who had recently conversed with the Marquis Del Campo, from whom he had learnt that the Court of Spain had acceded to our right of navigating the Mississippi. Col: Smith has also read to me a passage out of another letter of the 6th...
It appears probable that advantages will result from giving to the Citizens at large information on the subject of the disturbances which exist in the Western parts of Pennsylvania. With this view, if no objection to the measure should occur to you, I would cause a publication to be made of the Report which I had the honor to address to you, dated the 5th instant. With the most perfect respect...
Treasury Department, May 28, 1790. Submits “five Contracts made by the superintendant of the Light house, piers &c on the river and Bay of Delaware” and recommends that these Contracts be approved. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Letter not found: from Alexander Hamilton, 21 July 1795. On 29 July, GW wrote Hamilton: “Your letters of the 20th and 21st Instt found me at this place.”
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President. the enclosed permit has been prepared on the intimation of the Secretary of State, for the Spanish Comissioners. The Secretary is not informed whether the doubt on the subject of mister Hammond’s application was removed. The return of the enclosed will be considered as the evidence that it was. LB , DLC:GW . The enclosed...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United States, a contract made by the Collector of the District of Washington in North Carolina, for the stakage of all the shoals & channels of that State to the Northward of the District of Wilmington, which have been heretofore thus designated. The former stakes having generally fallen to decay, or...
Mr Hamilton presents his respects to the President. He has written the Letter to Mr Clarkeson which the President desired, & which if not countermanded will go by post. But in the course of writting it, the following reflection has pressed upon his mind with so much force that he thinks it his duty to submit it to The President. Clarkeson held the office of Marshal, a troublesome &...
I have embraced the first moment of leisure to execute your wish, on the subject to which the enclosed Notes are applicable—They are neither so accurate nor so full, as I should have been glad to make them: but they are all that my situation has permitted. Nothing new has occured in my Department worth mentioning —I thought that the following extract of a letter from Mr King might not be...
The Secretary of State in referring to you the question of the answer to be given to Mr. Hammond concerning compensation for certain captured vessels will I presume transmit to you the opinions of the other Gentlemen as well as his own. Besides the reasons hastily sketched in the memorandums given to the Secretary of State—there is one of a delicate nature which I did not think fit to put on a...