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I should have answered your last favour, ere this [but in?] [conse]quence of the information you gave me, I went to Haverhill [last?] Thursday and returned but the day before yesterday. Regularly the Sunday is my scribbling day, but as there are several opportunities for sending at present, I [can]not suffer the week to pass over without noticing you, and must there fore [steal?] an hour or...
It has not been altogether from a neglect of my duties that I have hitherto omitted writing you; from situation as well as from inclination, I have been in a great measure secluded from such political information, as might afford you any entertainment, and from a proper modesty, I thought it best to forbear transmitting, any insignificant details concerning my own person.— Even now the same...
No, my dear Madam, I have not tasted of the waters of Lethe, nor have the Laws of Nature, been obliterated from my heart, by too close an attention to those of Nations. The reasons which have hitherto prevented me from writing since I left you, are various; but would not be very interesting in the detail, for which reason I shall, omit the unnecessary tediousness of a justification, and offer...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of two Letters from you, of the 9 th. and of the 19 th: of last month; the former of which I received, about three weeks ago, while I was at Boston, attending upon the Session of our Supreme Court; and the latter came to hand, but two days since. I hope I shall ever feel suitably grateful, for the tender solicitude, which you express with respect to my future...
I have more than once mentioned to you, the state of retirement from political conversation in which I live, and the restraints which I am endeavouring to lay upon a disposition inclining, perhaps with too much ardor, to feel interested in public occurrences. But it sometimes happens that I am accidentally witness to conversations upon these subjects; from which I collect some trifling...
As you were somewhat in my debt in the article of Letters, when I left Boston, I expected ere this to have received something from you; and I was not a little disappointed when Bridge came from Boston to find he had nothing but your compliments, or some such thing to deliver me from you. I am willing however to make allowances for the multiplicity of your avocations, and not having the same...
I received your short Epistle by M r: Thomas at Ipswich, where I was then attending the Court of Common Pleas: and at the same time he gave me very agreeable information respecting your performance at exhibition; which has been confirmed to me from several quarters. From the conversations which have repeatedly passed between us, you will readily imagine how much I was gratified, to hear that...
Phillips delivered me at Exeter a half sheet of paper from you, I trust I need not say it was very acceptable; I would only observe by the way, that I am no great friend to half-sheets. Sat verbum— We had a comfortable ordination. Phillips can give you any particulars that your curiosity may wish to be informed of. He was however by an unfortunate accident detained from the dance in the...
I received a few days since your favour of the 10 th: inst t. and as there will be a difficulty in procuring a tenant for the house, I should wish if possible to take some other office at least for a time. The multiplicity of your affairs almost precludes the hope that you can attend to this matter: if however you should hear of any room conveniently situated which might be hired for a...
I have been wishing to write you, for several weeks past; I intended to have replied to your favour of the 10 th: of last month, at an early period; but for sometime I was too lazy, and for this fortnight past I have been too busy. Just upon the point of going away, I find myself crowded with a hundred little trifling affairs, which at divers times during a residence of three years I have...
I received on Commencement day, your obliging favour of the 11 th: of last month, and should have replied to it before this time, had I not been constantly employ’d in making and executing my arrangements for my removal to this place. For kind wishes which you are pleased to express for my welfare and happiness, I can only return the sincerest assurances of gratitude; Thanks, are called the...
I received by M rs: Atkinson your favour of the 20 th: inst t: which has added not a little to the weight of anxiety which, before hung heavy upon my mind. The Suspense in which I must continue, I know not how long with respect to my own prospects, has at present a constant operation to depress Spirits not naturally very lively; but when my solicitude for the welfare and happiness of my Sister...
I have received within a few days three Letters with which you have favoured me, and shall pay to their contents all the attention which I can command. The scheme which you have traced out in the last of them is so extensive, that I am apprehensive it will require much time, as well as very constant enquiries, to obtain the information of the several kinds which you mention. I shall endeavour...
I am I believe more than one Letter in your debt; but I feel if possible less inclination than ever to write to my friends as I have no good news to tell them about myself, and very little about any one else. I have now the advantage of being three hundred miles distant from every member of the family; alone in the world, without a soul to share the few joys I have, or to participate in my...
I have a Letter from you which has called forth the few remaining sparks of my attenion to politics— Were my own mind at ease, I should at the present time enter more than ever into the spirit of speculation upon public affairs. The prospect is really glorious; but it is perhaps impossible, at least for a man whose patriotism is not tinctured with more heroism than mine, to consider the...
I received with great pleasure, my dear Mamma, your favour of the 7 th: inst t: which relieved me in some measure from my anxiety on account of your health, though it is now again alarmed at having no letters this evening by the Post. I want exceedingly to hear of your arrival at Philadelphia, and of the thorough restoration of your health.— I hope nothing will induce you to spend another...
I have indeed, my dear Sister, been guilty of a neglect, in omitting so long to write to you, which I cannot upon any principle justify to my own heart; I am sure it has been totally inconsistent with the ardent and sincere brotherly affection which that heart invariably acknowledges for you, and which no length of time, no absence, no course of circumstances, shall ever impair: I have very...
I have just returned from the Post-Office, where I was in hopes of finding Letters from Philadelphia, but found myself disappointed. I wrote you almost a month ago by a private hand, (M r: Gray) and I hope you received my Letter in Season. I have since thought that some of the expressions in it, upon a subject which principally concerns myself might rather tend to increase your alarm than to...
I have just received your favour of the 22 d: inst t : thanks you know are “the exchequer of the poor.” upon that exchequer of mine you are entitled to bills to a large amount. I assure you I feel the obligation of your attention to my trunk, which has not yet arrived, but which will be very acceptable when it comes. But your Letter has excited my curiosity, and I find myself very much...
I received by the last Post your short favour, inclosing a much longer one to Quincy which I have punctually delivered: I know not whether this will reach you before your departure from Philadelphia; if it does not it can do no harm: and if it does, as you have concluded upon coming this way with the family it may be of some service to me.— You recollect doubtless that while I was in...
I received almost a fortnight since your favour of July 23 d: and should have answered it before now, if I was in the habit of doing as I ought I sued the note immediately, but have not heard from Johonnot since The two actions to which you requested me to attend were both continued; I had not seen Nightengale, and thought it would be expedient to continue that: the other was continued at a...
I received your favour of the 17 th: inst t: from New-York, and am happy to hear you had got well so far on your journey. I hope you will be equally punctual on your arrival at Philadelphia. I must request your attention to the memorandum, which I left with you last Spring; and that you would not forget to send my segars before the navigation closes for the Season. the numbers of the Gazette...
I received last week your favour of the 17 th: of last month, and found in it none of that tediousness which you seem to apprehend: indeed I suspect your fears were in some measure dictated by your indolence, and that you make them a pretext in your own mind, to relieve you from the tediousness of writing: but this pretence must not serve you: for I can assure you, that your Letters will...
I have been for more than three weeks indebted to you for two very agreeable Letters, which Mr. Otis brought from you. They would not have remained so long unanswered but for a variety of circumstances which have concurred to engross all my time during that period. It is possible that you may have observed in the Centinel about a month since, that a Committee of 21 inhabitants at this Town was...
A variety of circumstances have occurred since you left this part of the Country, which have combined to change in some measure the state of our parties in this State; you have probably heard of them from other Quarters, and ought to have heard of them before this from me. I will endeavour however to retrieve as far as possibly my former deficiency, and to give you an account of the present...
I believe I am in arrears with you, for two or three Letters, which is owing in some measure to my indolence, but in a greater degree to the stagnation of events worthy of communication— The purpose of my present Letter is to enquire of you respecting a warrant from the Treasury for some money, which it seems must be sent here to be signed by your father before it can be sent back for payment....
I wrote to my brother Thomas more than a fortnight ago, respecting the warrant, & requesting him to see it forwarded— But whether from an apprehension on his part of an additional delay, or from what other cause I know not, he has not done it, and last Evening in answer to my Letter I received from him one urging very strongly the necessity of his having an order to receive the money.— Two...
Our Electors met in this town on Wednesday last, and their Votes for President and Vice-President were unanimous this was generally expected here, and the event is supposed to have been nearly if not wholly the same in all the New-England States— New-York it is imagined was unanimous for M r: Clinton as V.P. their Electors are chosen by their legislature, where their Governor has a bare...
I received last evening your favour of the 5 th: instant— The votes of the Electors in Connecticut and Rhode-Island, were unanimous it seems, as well as in this State; I have not heard any further, but we presume there was the same unanimity in New-Hampshire, which if it be the case, will I think do credit to New-England. We expect nothing but the voice of Faction from New-York; and we know...
The bearer of this Letter, Mr. D’Hauteval, is a french Gentleman from the Island of St. Domingo, where he had lately the misfortune to lose a plantation of great value, by the devastation of the insurgent negroes. He has been about two months in this town, where I have frequently had the pleasure of meeting him in Company, and where his amiable manners have entitled him to as much esteem, ás...
As I was going to meeting this afternoon a Gentleman met me in the street, and desired me to fill him a writ immediately which he intends to have served as early as possible in the morning. I accordingly did it, and as it is now too late to attend the afternoon service, I think I cannot employ the leisure time thus thrown on my hands better than in giving you an account of the commercial...
I have received your Letter containing the orders upon the branch bank, and also that with the bill of lading of 3 barrels; I ought to have written you this information a post or two ago, but some business, more indolence, and most of all forgetfulness was the occasion of my omission. I suppose you will soon commence Attorney, and I understand you have some thoughts of retiring into one of the...
Your father will be the bearer of this Letter, and probably will find you at Philadelphia, which our late accounts represent as being totally free from the pestilence, which raged with so much violence for two or three months.— Remember however and be cautious— In the midst of the general calamity, for which your friends participate in the general affliction, they recollect with pleasure,...
I must apologize for not having answered before this your last Letter; but your conjectures with respect to Columbus were not without foundation, and what with politics and Law, what with public and private discussion, I have scarcely had a moment that I could call my own to perform my duties to you.— Columbus has been attacked in the Chronicle by a writer under the signature of Americanus,...
I received by the last post your favour enclosing a draft upon the branch Bank, for 100 dollars. The political speculations of which your fraternal feelings have formed so favourable a judgment, originated in motives at least as disinterested, as are the common sources of patriotism. That a literary reputation is an object of Ambition to the writer, it would be false and absurd to deny. That...
You will doubtless hear before this reaches you, the event of a Town-meeting which was called here lately for the purpose of helping forward M r: Madison’s resolutions, and of intimidating our respresentatives who opposed them. After great [exertion] had been made to raise a Committee ready for every thing, [and the?] Committee had reported a number of resolves to answer [their purpo]ses, a...
I received on Saturday your favour of the 13 th: Inst t: Our Supreme Court closed their session in this town last monday, and I am thereby left with more leisure, and less care upon my hands than I had been for some time past used to. The anxieties of business carry with them an antidote, but the anxieties of no business have nothing to weaken or alleviate them. My Grandmother is still living,...
I received yesterday your very laconic favour enclosing a draft upon the bank for 500 dollars which I shall pay over according to your directions. We are in great apprehension of being forced into a War. The last intelligence we have from the West Indies is that they capture and condemn all our vessels without discrimination— A Man arrived yesterday with an account of more than thirty sail...
I received this morning your favour of the 3 d: inst t: We still hold tolerably firm to the text of neutrality; though we have our partialities for the french, and are much irritated against the british.— This is natural enough, and indeed, although we have some grounds of complaint against both with respect to their treatment of our commerce, in their present contest; yet it is not to be...
M r: Newcomb has executed a power of Attorney, authorising you to receive his interest due. I herewith enclose it.— You mention in your Letter to your mother, that you expect to leave Philadelphia the 28 th: of this month. But not where you purpose to go. I should be glad to hear from you once in a while. I think you are now in my debt upon the score of our correspondence. War—seems to be now...
Mr: Ebenezer Dorr, and Mr: Edward Jones, merchants, of this Town, by this Post send a petition to Congress for leave, to send a small vessel in ballast to some port in Europe. It is a matter of great importance to them, that they should obtain their request. Mr: Dorr has bills of exchange drawn in France in his favour upon some person here, and they are protested. It becomes therefore of the...
M r: Dorr obtained a passage in the vessel with M r: Jay, and M r: Jones, had an opportunity to go from Newport, so that they had no occasion to make the application to Congress, in behalf of which I requested your favour. I drew another petition some time since, for the manufacturers of snuff and tobacco in this Town, making representations against the tax proposed upon those articles. I know...
The stage in which I had engaged a passage for Philadelphia this morning, has gone away by mistake, and left me behind, which gives me leisure to write a line by my brother. He intends to pay you a visit this summer, and will be the bearer of this. I was detained three days in Newport for a wind, but otherwise have had a very comfortable passage from Boston hither— I find my health better than...
I arrived here last Evening, and this morning paid my Respects to the Secretary of State, who introduced me to the President.— I find that it is their wish that I should be as expeditious in my departure as possible. I told the Secretary, that the state of my own affairs would render my return to Boston previous to my departure, extremely eligible to [my]self. He enquired whether it would be...
I am yet uncertain as to the next point of my departure. But as I do not hear of any opportunity to go from hence, it is probable I may be permitted to return to Boston. I am glad that the man who has partly engaged to go with me, has already been to take, the small pox, as he will probably be ready upon my return and I shall be obliged to go by the very first opportunity. I have begun upon my...
Since my arrival here, I have employed all the Time, that I have been able to spare, from the more important business of visits and dinners, in the Office of the Secretary of State, and have gone through six large folio volumes containing your dispatches to Congress while you were in Europe. They can have but little relation to the business upon which I am about to proceed; but they have...
I expected to have been on my way to Boston before this; but M r: Hamilton is gone into the Country, and I cannot be supplied with my instructions untill he returns. He has been expected every hour these four days, and it is very possible that four days hence he may still be hourly expected. In the mean while I am here lolling away my time, and sweating away my person, with nothing to do, and...
I am still waiting for the arrival of Col l: Hamilton whom it is necessary for me to see before my departure, and who has been detained several days in the Country by the sickness of a child. I received your favour of the 20 th: inst t: and my brother is now prepared to go with me.— We should be very happy to comply with your request respecting the bracelets, but we shall certainly not have...
I have just received your favor of the 9th inst. with the inclosures, and agreeable to your directions, herewith return the former power cancelled, and the previous Schedule marked E. The word “your” instead of “his” sufficient Warrant, used at the close of the present, as well as the former power, is I presume not sufficiently material to need an alteration. I have the honor to be with the...
Col l: Hamilton arrived in Philadelphia, the night before you left it, but from the pressure of business more immediately urgent, was not prepared for me untill last Friday. On that Evening I left the City, in company with Gen l Knox, and arrived here (quite overcome with fatigue, and somewhat unwell of the complaint which you brought from the same place) on Saturday at about 6 in the Evening....