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Documents filtered by: Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 6911-6920 of 48,243 sorted by editorial placement
I did myself the honor to write you a hasty line this Evening giving it as my opinion that the city was no longer a place of safety for you. I write you again lest that should not get to hand. The enemy are on the road to Sweedes ford, the main body about four miles from it. They sent a party this evening to Davesers ferry, which fired upon me and some others in crossing it, killed one man,...
[ Reading Furnace, Pennsylvania ] September 19, 1777. Orders McDougall to join main Army. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.
[ September 20, 1777. On September 21, 1777, Hamilton and Laurens wrote to Sullivan : “We have just received your favour of Yesterday.” Letter not found .] Laurens, like H, was an aide-de-camp of Washington. A native of South Carolina and the son of Henry Laurens, John Laurens was H’s closest friend in Washington’s official family.
paid at Christiana for family’s breakfast, horses &c.— £6.5  paid on the road from thence to Wilmington for lodging &c— 6.   paid for breakfast the morning we crossed brandywine— 1.12 pd.  1.12 15.9  Received the above from Capt Gibbs ADS , Hamilton Papers George Washington Papers , Library of Congress. Town on creek of same name, which flows into the Delaware near Wilmington. I.e.,...
We have just received your favour of Yesterday, desiring from us a Testimony of your Conduct, so far as it fell under our Observation, the day of the Battle on the Brandywine. As we had not the pleasure of seeing you in the fore part of that Action when the Line at large was Engaged, We are unable from our own Knowledge, to say any thing of your Conduct at that time. But we can chearfully...
The distressed situation of the army for want of blankets and many necessary articles of Cloathing, is truly deplorable; and must inevitably be destructive to it, unless a speedy remedy be applied. Without a better supply than they at present have, it will be impossible for the men to support the fatigues of the campaign in the further progress of the approaching inclement season. This you...
I left camp last evening and came to this city to superintend the collection of blankets and cloathing for the army. Mr. Lovel sends to inform me there is an express going off to Congress, and I do myself the honor to communicate a brief state of things, when I left camp. The enemy moved yesterday from where they lay opposite to valley forge &c. higher up the river on their old scheme of...
I have order’d eight or Ten light Horse more to your assistance, and if you should find a further force necessary to facilitate the business you are upon, there are fifty or sixty dismounted No Carolinians attach’d at present to Colo. Nicholas Corps. These must be subject to your order. I have been just now inform’d, that there are not less than three thousand pair of Shoes in the hands of...
I am in Philadelphia on some business of great importance to the army; to execute which I stand in need of a party of about 100 men which are not readily to be procured here. If Your Excy. will be pleased to order over such a party under good active officers, you will equally serve the public & oblige.   Yr. Excy’s   Most Obed servt. ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston.
by Virtue of powers from His Excellency General Washington I do hereby Authorise you to require from the inhabitants, contributions of Blankets and Cloathing of every kind and to take whatever materials you know will be useful to the Army that you may find in the Stores keeping an account of the same and giving receipts. ADS , sold by Stan V. Henkels, March 9, 1904, Lot 1150. Text taken from...