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ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania I received last Night yours of the 7th. Instant. From what I know of Capt. Wickes and his Carracter, I am persuaded he is not capable of the Injustice you mention, and that the Matter must have been misrepresented to you. However, being desirous not only to procure Justice, but if possible to give Satisfaction to all of this much respected Nation, who...
ALS (draft): Library of Congress We are much oblig’d to M. De la Haye and his Friends for their Offer of Supplying the Americans with Merchandize, and we desire them to accept our Thanks; But it does not suit us to enter into any Engagements of the kind; We as Commissioners from the Congress have no Orders for purchasing other Goods than what are necessary for the Arming and Clothing of the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am exceedingly oblig’d by the exact Plan and Profile you have been so kind as to send me, of the hydraulic Machine at Chatou. Be pleased to accept my thankful Acknowledgments of the Favour, and be assured that I am, with great Esteem, Sir, Your most obedient humble Servant A virtually indecipherable notation on the verso, which may have no relation to the...
AL (draft): American Philosophical Society J’ai reçu, avec ma petite Dialogue, votre charmante Epitre & Puisque je trouve que Madame la Goutte est de votre Connoissance, ma tres chere Amie je vous prie de grace que quand elle me fait une autre Visite, vous voudriez bien l’accompagner. Votre Présence me dedommagera de la sienne. Avec une telle Garde, la Peine deviendra Plaisir. We can identify...
Draft: American Philosophical Society Les affaires dont je suis chargé, Monsieur, ne me permettent pas de quitter paris et par consequent d’accepter vostre invitation; je vous prie de croire cependant que j’y suis tres sensible, et que c’est avéc reconnoissance que je suis, Monsieur, vostre tres humble et tres obeissant serviteur. Notation: Le Veillard Possibly to Richelet who had invited BF...
Draft: American Philosophical Society I have perus’d the Letters and Papers you put into my Hands, and shall, as you desire, say what occurs to me on the considering them. I do not know Mr. Murdoch personally, but have heard that he is a Person of Credit and some Note in that Country, and esteemed by the People there. I imagine that little is to be expected from a Suit of Law, to be carried on...
Your favor of this morning, announcing the unanimous Resolution of the States of Utrecht taken yesterday in favor of American Independence, is just come to hand. I had recieved a few Minutes before a french Gazette of Utrecht, containing the same Article: but I am very happy to recieve it in a more authentick manner from a Gentleman of so distinguished a Reputation for Patriotism. The...
Copy: Library of Congress J’ai reçu, Monsieur, et lu avec beaucoup d’intérêt l’ode au peuple Anglois et l’ode adressée à la Hollande que vous avez eu la bonté de m’envoyer. On ne sauroit faire un plus bel usage de la Poësie que de la ramener à ce qu’elle fut dans son origine, c’est a dire de la consacrer à chanter les choses utiles à l’humanité et les hommes qui les executent, je vous remercie...
I have received Your Letter of the 5th Instant—and am much obliged to the Court for their attention in the case of John Springer Junior, and for committing him to the custody of the Sheriff. In a few days I shall give such orders about him—as will be consistent with justice and my duty to the public. In the mean time he will remain in custody of the Sheriff. His conduct in deserting to the...
Your Letter of the 18th instant came to hand yesterday. You seem in that to decline meddling with the grain in the counties of Westmoreland, Northumberland because the quantity is small and the commissions too trifling to be worth your attention; while you undertake the care of the grain in those counties, where the quantity is considerable. You will please to recollect that the charge we...
I understand Mr Skinner is gone to Philadelphia. You will keep the inclosed Letter for him till he returns, when You will take the earliest opportunity of delivering it to him. I desire to see him as soon as he arrives & have written to him for the purpose. You will inform the Officer who came with a flag to Elizabeth Town Yesterday—that he is not to wait for an Answer to the Letters he...
I have received your favor of the 10th of Febry & must take the liberty to tell you candidly there would not be a propriety in my writing to the President of Congress respecting your extra-expences while acting as Depy Comy of Prisoners; because it would open a door to innumerable applications, because I do not conceive it is proper for me to interfere in the pecuniary Arrangements of...
Copy: Library of Congress I received the Letter you did me the honour of writing to me the 22. Instant, with a Copy of the Vessels in which I find myself mention’d but too advantageously.— Please to accept my thankful Acknowledgements.— I do not perfectly comprehend your Plan of finding the different Relations of Weights, Measures, &c. by means of Compass. But I believe the English Society of...
I embrace this first oppertunity to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 20th from Philadelphia. Your meeting with the smallest delay in receiving payment for the Land purchased of Messrs Dow & Co. gives me pain—I receive no Earthly advantage from it—I have been paying interest for the Money near two Months & one of these I have had it on my desk. Had Mr Lund Washington, in explicit...
The Honble Robt Morris Esqr. will pay Mr Lund Washingtons Bills upon me for £680 in your favor—£600 in favor of Mr Peter Dow—and £600 in favor of Mr Collin McIver. I am—Sir Yr Most Hble Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Yours of June 23d. have received. I believe there is no Danger of an Invasion your Way, but the Designs of the Enemy are uncertain and their Motions a little misterious. Before this Letter is sealed, which will not be till Sunday next, I hope I shall be able to inform you better. I rejoice at your fine Season, and still more at my Brother Cranches Attention to Husbandry. Am very glad he bought...
This is one of my fortunate days. The Post brought me, a Letter from you and another from my Friend and Brother. The particular Account you give me of the Condition of each of the Children is very obliging. I hope the next Post will inform me, that you are all, in a fine Way of Recovery. You say I must tell you of my Health and Situation. As to the latter, my Situation is as far removed from...
You will believe me, when I inform You, that I am grievously disappointed in only having to acknowledge the reciept of just two Lines and an half from You by Capt. Grinnell. I am sorry that the Shortness of your Notice has deprived me of so much Happiness. The Card however will keep alive my Expectations ’till the promised Letters arrive. But lest Miss Nabby should think I set no Value upon...
This Letter will go by the Hand of the Honourable Samuel Hewes Esqr., one of the Delegates in Congress from North Carolina, from the Month of September 1774, untill 1777. I had the Honour to serve with him upon the naval Committee, who laid the first Foundations, the Corner Stone of an American navy, by fitting to Sea the Alfred, Columbus, Cabott, Andrew Doria, Providence, and several others....
I am indeed the Silvia, the once favored correspondent of Diana; But I am Silvia without my Beloved flock, my former sheepfolds are Laid waste, my Lambs are scatter’d, and I mourn here among other congregations the loss of my former companions.—I thank you for the testimony you have given me of your remembrance. Should have Certifyd my grateful reception by the first Conveyance but...
Gen. Warren writes me, that my Farm never looked better, than when he last saw it, and that Mrs. —— was like to outshine all the Farmers. —I wish I could see it.—But I can make Allowances. He knows the Weakness of his Friends Heart and that nothing flatters it more than praises bestowed upon a certain Lady. I am suffering every day for Want of my farm to ramble in.—I have been now for near Ten...
I this day Received a few lines from my Friend, whose Long silence I have not been able to Account for but suppose her Letters are Directed southward. Have you any Late private Inteligence from that quarter, and do our Friends their Really think we shall be Invaded on all sides, or do they mean only to advise us to be Ready. My heart at times almost dies within me only with the Apprehension...
Yesterday, I took a long Walk with our Secretary Mr. Thompson to a Place called Fells Point, a remarkable Piece of Ground about a mile from the Town of Baltimore. It is a Kind of Peninsula which runs out into the Harbour, and forms a Bason before the Town. This Bason, within thirty Years, was deep enough for large Tobacco ships to ride in, but since that Time has filled up ten Feet, so that...
I received yours of the 14th. ultmo., should not have defer’d answering it so long had I been able to have wrote you, but have had a lame hand, and was unable to put Pen to Paper when I receiv’d it. I sent you a b arre l of Flower which you acknowledge the Rec eip t off in your Letter. I hope it will prove good. I got Mr. Hall (Baker of this place) to exammine all the Flower we then had in...
This Evening I have satisfactory Intelligence of the real Embarkation of your very dear Treasure at Nantes l’Orient the 17th. of June and that he was left well 12 days after, off the western Islands. The Secretary of Arthur Lee arrived at Metompkin, Virginia, Augst. 1st. in a very swift sailing Vessel. Mr. Adams told him at parting that he had good News for Congress and sent his Respects. The...
This day, I think, has been the most remarkable of all. Sullivan came here from Lord Howe, five days ago with a Message that his Lordship desired a half an Hours Conversation with some of the Members of Congress, in their private Capacities. We have spent three or four days in debating whether We should take any Notice of it. I have, to the Utmost of my Abilities during the whole Time, opposed...
I read in a great Writer, Montesquieu that “l’honneur, en imposant la loi de servir, veut en être l’arbitre; et, s’il se trouve choqué, il exige ou permet qu’on se retire chez Soi.” C’est une des Règles suprêmes de l’honneur, Que lorsque nous avons été une fois placés dans un rang, nous ne devons rien faire ni souffrir qui fasse voir que nous nous tenons inferieurs à ce rang même.” These being...
The Weather still continues cloudy and cool and the Wind Easterly. Howe’s Fleet and Army is still incognito. The Gentlemen from South Carolina, begin to tremble for Charlestown. If Howe is under a judicial Blindness, he may be gone there. But what will be the Fate of a scorbutic Army cooped up in a Fleet for Six, Seven or Eight Weeks in such intemperate Weather, as We have had. What will be...
The Postmaster at N. York, in a Panick, about a fortnight ago fled to Dobbs’s Ferry, about 30 Miles above N.Y. upon Hudsons River, which has thrown the Office into disorder, and interrupted the Communication so much that I have not received a Line of yours, since that dated the Second of September. Nor have I received a News Paper, or any other Letter from Boston since that date. The same...
Peace seems to have closed all Communication with America. ’Tis a very long time since any Vessels or Letters have arrived either in France or Holland. We cannot account for this Circumstance, but upon the Supposition, that News had reached America of Negociations for Peace being opened, and that while this Business was pending the Merchant prefered a State of Inactivity to putting any thing...