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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Huntington, Samuel" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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LS : National Archives; press copy and transcript: National Archives; incomplete copy: Library of Congress I duly received the two Letters your Excellency did me the honour of writing to me both dated the 19th. of June, together with the Letter address’d to the King, & the three Commissions with the Instructions relative to the Negociations for Peace. I immediately went to Versailles, and...
I have been honored with your favor of the 10th announcing your resignation of the Chair of Congress and the Election of Mr McKean to that important Station. I flattered myself with the hopes of an opportunity of personally acknowledging the attentions which I received from you during your presidency; but as I find you could not with convenience make a visit to the Army on your way home, I am...
LS : National Archives; AL (draft): Library of Congress; copies: Library of Congress, New York Public Library; press copy: Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères; transcript: National Archives The Number of Congress Bills that have been drawn on the Ministers in Spain and Holland, which I am by my Acceptances obliged to pay, as well as those drawn upon myself, the extreme Importance of...
Amsterdam, 7 July 1781. RC and signature in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 264–265. printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:549. John Thaxter wrote this letter during John Adams’ absence at Paris. It contains an English translation of a resolution that the...
Amsterdam, 7 July 1781. RC and signature in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 262–263. printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:550. John Thaxter wrote this letter during John Adams’ absence at Paris. It contains an English translation of an article that appeared...
I do myself the honor to inform your Excellency that the Army marched from their Camp near Peekskill on the morning of the 2d without either Tents or Baggage, and reached Valentines Hill about four miles on this side Kings bridge a little after day light the morning following. Genl Lincoln with a detachment of 800 men fell down the North River in Boats, landed near Phillips’s House before day...
Amsterdam, 5 July 1781. RC and signature in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 254–261. printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:540–543. This is the first of a series of letters to Congress that John Thaxter composed in John Adams’ name during Adams’ absence at...
Amsterdam, 29 June 1781. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 246–251. printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:525–527. This letter consists of an English translation of the letter presented to the States General on 21 June by Louis Ernst, Duke of...
I have been honored with your Excellencys several Letters of the 20th & 21st instant—with their several Enclosures—sir Henry Clinton has indeed refused to make any Exchange of Genl Burgoyne in the Military Line, but upon my Consent to put the Prisoners taken at the Cedars upon a footing of Exchange equal with any other Prisoners of War—I know of nothing at present subsisting between Sir Henry...
Major Jackson has been sometime here, in pursuance of Instructions from Colo. Laurens, in order to dispatch the purchase of the Goods, and the shipping of the Goods and Cash for the United States, which are to go by the South Carolina. But when all things appeared to be ready, I recieved a Letter from his Excellency Dr. Franklin informing me, that he feared his funds would not admit of his...