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    • Washington, George
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    • Heath, William
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Heath, William" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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I have the pleasure to inform you that in the night of the 18th Major Lee with a detachment of 400 men surprised the enemy’s garrison at Powles-hook (which you know is within cannon shot of the batteries at New York)—& brought off the garrison consisting of about 150 Men. Such repeated instances of disgrace to the British arms will undoubtedly, make them feel sore, & seek opportunities to...
I have your favs. of the 31st ulto and 2d and 3d instants. As I do not think myself at liberty to grant Genl Hamiltons request without the concurrence of Congress I have transmitted the Copy of his letter to them and have desired their immediate answer, that if they do not chuse to comply, the Flag Vessel may not be unnecessarily detained. I have sent Officers to meet the troops at Enfeild and...
You will be pleased to Order Captain Welles, or Officer Commanding the Water Guard to detach a Subaltern and 25 Men to releive the Garrison of the Block House at Dobbs Ferry. I am Sir Your Most Obedient & Humble Servant MHi : Heath Papers.
Morristown [ New Jersey ] July 27, 1777. Disapproves of requisition of arms for proposed St. Johns expedition. Approves of Heath’s methods of dealing with deserters. Requests Heath not to send French volunteers to Headquarters, as their pretensions to office are “embarrassing.” Reports that British fleet’s destination is probably Philadelphia. Orders Continental troops sent to the Northern...
As you are Forthwith to take upon You the Command of the Brigade, now upon their March to Norwich in Connecticutt, consisting of the 5th, 16th, 19th, 24th & 25th Regiments, you will without Delay proceed to Norwich where you will confer with the persons appointed to provide Vessells for the Transportation of The Troops to New York; Dispatch, & Secrecy are necessary in Embarquing, & Sailing...
I have your favs. of the 7th and 10th instants. I am pleased to find from the Copy of the letter from Bordeaux that matters wore so good a face in France, it is more than probable that they will push an advantagious Trade with us before a formal declaration of War, indeed if they were to strike a Blow before the declaration, they would only repay England, for playing a Game of the same kind in...
Captain Hopkins of Colonel Moylans Light Dragoons goes to Boston to procure Cloathing & accoutrements for the Regiment against the ensuing Campaign. As the prices of many articles have risen from there being too great a number of Bidders, I have directed the Captain, if there are any Persons Purchasing for the Continent not to interfere with them, but, to apply to them for such articles as he...
I have recd your favr of the 22d inclosing a letter from Colo. Malcom—If there should be such a surplus of Cattle as to enable you to spare any for Fort schuyler, it will be very agreeable to me, as my first Wish is to have that post supplied and secured. I am Dear Sir Yr most obt and hble Servt MHi : Heath Papers.
I have lately recd a letter from the secretary of the Board of War in which he complains that you have drawn Arms for the full Complement of Henly’s, Lee’s and Jackson’s Regiments when there is scarce any chance of their being compleated, I therefore desire if the matter is so, that you may return all the supernumerary Arms into the Magazine at Springfield or Brookfield. As you will...
I have no objection to Austin’s having permission to go to Morris Town, if nothing unfavorable has been discovered of him, while employed as you Mention. I am Dear Sir With great esteem Your Most Obed. Servt MHi : Heath Papers.
I have recd your favr of the 28th ulto—From the circumstances which you mention, the command on the lines may be continued at one hundred Men, with strict orders to the Officers to fall back upon the posts, on the first serious move up the River. I shall set out for Newport tomorrow morning. My notice is so short, that I am obliged to deprive myself of the pleasure of seeing you before I go,...
By the Order of this day you will see the Army is to go into Tents as soon as conveniently may be—The ground of Encampment for the different Corps ought to be as contiguous to their present Cantonments as the Nature of the ground will admit. I am Dear Sir Your Most Obedt Servant MHi : Heath Papers.
New Windsor [ New York ] June 25, 1779 . Acknowledges receipt of information concerning enemy. Instructs Heath to keep troops in readiness to act. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Since I had the pleasure of informing you Yesterday of our Success at Trenton, I have received Advice that Count Donnop with the remainder of the Enemy’s Army, immediately upon the News, decamped, and was on his Retreat towards South Amboy. On hearing this Genl Ewing and Colo. Cadwallader passed the River with the Troops under their command, and Genl Mifflin will follow this day with a...
Upon a full view of what (from the Returns) must be the state of our Army when the Levies leave it the first of January—and of the little prospect there is of getting the places of many, if any of them supplied by that time—and when the importance of West point and the Southern communication with it is taken into consideration I can think of no better disposition of the Army for Winter...
Your favor of the 20th Inst. with the several inclosures has been duly receivd. I cannot but hope your decision respecting the soldiers under sentence for desertion will be attended with beneficial consequences. It is a fortunate circumstance that the Troops will be recoverd from the small Pox at so early a period as will afford time for establishing discipline and making preparations for the...
It is my intention that General Nixon shall form a junction with General Howe at Pines’ bridge Croton River. This you will communicate to him, and send to Genl Howe to know, when he espects to be there; and let General Nixon begin his march so as to arrive there nearly at the same time with him. You will give General Nixon your instructions accordingly, and advise him to be cautious in his...
You will receive with this a Copy of my Letter to you of the 19th Inst. Two reasons have led me to send it, the one lest the Original may have miscarried, the other to explain it fully if you have already recd it—I do not mean to tie up your hands from effecting, or even attempting any thing that may prove honourable to yourself, or usefull to the Cause. Altho’ the original design of your...
Your two favors of yesterday, with their inclosures, were duly delivered to me. I do not think any considerable alteration, need be made, respecting the out Posts, I approve your holding the Troops you mention, in readiness to support them; but it would not be eligable, to advance any more Artillery at present—The Detachments on the Lines, ought to be extremely vigilant. I have written to Mr...
West Point, July 16, 1779. Orders Heath to Peekskill to take command. LS , in writing of H, Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston.
Altho I must confess that it appears to me rather surprizing to have a request for so many Gentlemen, and of such Rank, to be absent from their Commands, at this Time of the Campaign, on Business to their State—Yet as it is the particular Desire of the Officers of the Line, I give my permission as requested, for all the Gentlemen except Major General Knox; who cannot by any means be spared...
You will be pleased to proceed immediately to the several Eastern States, with the dispatches, addressed to the Governors of Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts Bay and the President of New Hampshire, on the subject of supplies for the Army. The present critical and alarming situation of our Troops and Garrisons for the want of provision, is (from the nature of your command) so perfectly...
I have received your letter of the 22d—The late European intelligence has so altered the immediate prospects of the Campaign, that I think it adviseable to dismiss the militia now in service and prevent any other coming out for the present. You will therefore let those now with you return home as soon as their services are no longer thought necessary by the Count de Rochambeau, for as the...
I wrote to you the 13th directing you to order eight of the Regiments of your State to march with the greatest expedition to peekskill. I then gave you my reasons for this alteration of my former orders. Altho’ I called upon you, in the most pressing manner, to hurry the Troops on, I cannot help again repeating my distress for the want of Men; the general Backwardness of the recruiting...
Notwithstanding the long preparations at New York and the strong appearances of a large Detachment’s being made from thence—it seems certain from very recent advices, that no Troops have sailed as yet, and that the Enemy hold themselves in collected force. What their designs really are I have not been able to learn, altho I have taken all the pains in my power to effect it. The Southern States...
The enclosed state of Queries I transmit for your consideration, and beg to have your observations thereon as soon as may be convenient; an early period will be most agreeable, as it is impossible for me to say how soon I may be obliged to make use of them—You will be pleased to communicate the same to Major Genl Howe, & Brigadier Genl Patterson, that I may also be favored with their opinions...
By the Resolution of Congress of 13th June the Corps of Invalids is ordered to compose a Part of the Garrison of West Point and I have now given Direction for the whole of it to repair thither accordingly. The Order for the three Companies at Boston, I have tho’t proper to enclose to you, that you may facilitate & hasten their Movement, & see that all of the Men who are capable of marching are...
I have received in order of their dates Your several Letters of the 21st & 31st Ulto & of the 2d & 4th Instant. I am exceedingly happy in the conduct of the Militia, in turning out with so much spirit & alacrity. It does them great honor, at the same time it is very interesting to the Common cause. The Count de Rochambeau has expressed himself highly pleased with them, and in such terms as has...
Some advices which I have received will detain me here longer than I expected—I am to desire you will immediately have all the light companies of the troops under your command completed to fifty rank and file each, and assemble the whole without delay at Peeks Kill. They must be completed with shoes and as far as possible with all other necessaries, for a march to Morris Town; as it will be a...
Before this Letter can reach you, the Brigade under Colo. Chester’s Command no doubt has reached you, but unless more assistance of Waggons and Teams are sent I cannot undertake to say when you will get a further reinforcement—let me entreat therefore that Genl Clinton and yourself will exert yourselves in getting, by Impressment, or otherwise, a parcel of Teams to come to our Assistance. The...