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    • Washington, George
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    • Heath, William
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Heath, William" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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As every thing, in a manner, depends upon obtaining Intelligence of the Enemys motions, I do most earnestly entreat you and Genl Clinton to exert yourselves to accomplish this most desireable end. leave no stone unturn’d, nor do not stick at expence to bring this to pass, as I never was more uneasy than on Acct of my want of knowledge on this Score. Keep besides this precaution, constant...
The present posture of our Affairs, the Season of the year, and many other reason’s which might be urged, renders it indispensably necessary that some Systematic plan should be form’d, and, as far as possible pursued, by us—I therefore desire that immediately upon receipt of this Letter you will let Genls Mifflin & Clinton know that I desire to see them with you, at this place, (Head Quarters)...
I have lately reciev’d information (on which I can in some measure rely) that it is impracticable for carriages to pass from Harlem point or any of the landing places contiguous to it, towards King’s bridge any other way than along the public roads; I should therefore concieve it would be highly expedient to throw every impediment and obstruction in the ways leading from the above mentioned...
Before this Letter can reach you, the Brigade under Colo. Chester’s Command no doubt has reached you, but unless more assistance of Waggons and Teams are sent I cannot undertake to say when you will get a further reinforcement—let me entreat therefore that Genl Clinton and yourself will exert yourselves in getting, by Impressment, or otherwise, a parcel of Teams to come to our Assistance. The...
Some advices lately recieved from Powle’s hook, has made it necessary that Col. William’s regiment, should march to that post as a re-inforcement to Col. Durkie; it will be proper therefore they should be immedy put in motion towards Mount Washington, where they are to cross. Yr hhble Servt LS , in William Grayson’s writing, MHi : Heath Papers.
I have now your letter of Sept. 18th before me; and cannot say that I, by any means approve of your proposal of sending artillery to annoy the frigate, and the Enemy’s batteries on Montrasure’s Island; in my opinion, it would only endanger the loss of our cannon, & waste our ammunition, without answering any one good or salutory purpose. With respect to the sick, I am as much afflicted at...
I should be glad if you would order Genl Saltenstall to draw as much Powder as will compleat his Militia to about fifteen or 18. Rounds a Man; as also Lead if they have it not, and Cartridge Paper that they may make their own Cartridges. At the sametime let him know, & desire him to Impress it strongly upon the Minds of his Men, that they must Acct for every Load which is not used in Action....
Your Letter of yesterday is before me with the list Inclosed; but this is doing the matter by halves only, and the delay must inevitably defeat the end; as it is impossible from the nature of things that the different Governments can withhold the nomination of Officers much longer—I therefore entreat you to delay not a moments time in summoning the Officers (under Sanction from me) to consider...
I have this Moment yours of this Evening. The Party of 100 Men were ordered up to assist a Detachment of Artillery in covering the two New Ships, should the Enemy attempt to cut them out or destroy them. Soon after I got home from Fort Washington I recd a Report that the Enemy had passed the new Ships and were landing at Dobb’s Ferry, I then directed Colo. Read to desire you, if that should be...
The Ships which have got up the River with their Tenders (and now two of our Row Galleys) must be well attended to, or they may undertake something against our Stores, Craft, or &ca at Spiten devil—delay no time therefore in having some Work thrown up at the Mouth of that Creek for the defence of what lyes within, & to prevent Surprizes. A Small number of Troops Imbark’d on Long Island...