Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 1-50 of 14,063 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
General Washington presents his compliments to Mr Howell and requests the favor of his company at dinner tomorrow 4 oclock. Monday. Privately owned.
Mrs Washington & myself heard with much pleasure from Major Jackson, that you & Mrs Morris had it in contemplation a visit to Prince Town; & we join very sincerely in offering you a Bed at our Quarters. The inconvenience of accepting it, can only be to yourselves, as the room is not so commodious as we could wish; but in the crowded situation of this place is equal perhaps to any you could...
You apply to me, My dear Madam, for absolution as tho’ I was your father Confessor; and as tho’ you had committed a crime, great in itself, yet of the venial class—You have reason good—for I find myself strangely disposed to be a very indulgent ghostly adviser on this occasion and, notwithstanding "you are the most offending Soul alive" (that is if it is a crime to write elegant Poetry) yet if...
I have been favored with your private letter of the 21st, & should have given it an acknowledgement sooner but thought a few days would have let me more into the views of Congress with respect to the Peace Establishment than I had any knowledge of at the time of its receipt—I am as much in the dark now as ever, and as unable to guess at the number of Troops which may be retained or raised for...
I enclose you the Copy of a Letter from Captn Segond in behalf of himself & Lieut. Boulieu, the only remaining Officers of Pulaski’s Legion—if the peculiar circumstances of those Gentlemen, are such as will exclude them from emoluments to which they ought to be intitled in common with other officers, and if it shall not be in your power to give adequate relief, I must request you will be...
I send you herewith the Estimate and requisition of Pay for the Writers employed under Colo. Varick’s direction, and hope he will be enabled, by the time they have completed their Work, to make a settlement with them. I have the honour to be Sir &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I have received your Letter of the 18th, also the duplicate inclosed in yours of the 24th. If the Articles should not have been forwarded you will be informed by the Superintendant of Finance, that the immediate necessity of incurring the expence of transportation has ceased to exist, I am however pleased with your exertions on this, as well as former occasions. The reasons you have given for...
I consider the War Office to be the proper channel of Application for the redress of any hardships under which you and Lieut. Boulieu may labour, from the peculiarity of your circumstances. I have therefore referred your Letter to the Honourable the Secretary at War, with a request, if he should not have it in his power to give adequate relief, that he would lay your case before Congress and...
I have received your favor of the 26th and am much obliged by your attention in procuring the Articles I had requested—I am also glad to find there is at length a prospect that the British will in reality soon take their departure from the United States. Whatever my private sentiments as an Individual may be, respecting the violent Policy which seems in some instances to be adopted; it is not...
I have the honor to enclose for the information of Congress, the report of the Baron Steuben, who was sent into Canada to make arrangements with General Haldimand for withdrawing the British forces from the Posts within the territory of the United States. The Letter from General Haldimand to me, referred to in his Letter of the 13th inst. to the Baron, is not yet come to hand. The...
I take the earliest opportunity of informing you, that the Baron Steuben has returned from Canada without being able to accomplish any part of the business he had in charge. In consequence of which and of the late Season of the Year, I have judged it impossible to take possession of the Western Posts this fall and have ordered a Stop to be put to the movement of Troops and Stores and to the...
I am very sorry to find by the Report of the Baron Steuben there is no probability that we shall be put in possession of the Western Posts this fall—in consequence of this information and the late season of the year I have directed the Movement of the Troops to be stopped, & the preparations to be suspended until farther Orders. Major Giles (who is the bearer of this Letter) having occasion to...
Upon considering the state of facts reported in your Letter of the 26th I think it expedient that a stop should be put to the movement of the Troops & Stores which were destined for the Western Posts; You will be pleased to give directions accordingly and to transmit the Letter herewith to the Quartr Mastr Genll as it relates to the same subject. I am dear sir with the greatest regard Your...
Some circumstances having intervened that render it impracticable during this fall, for us to take possession of the Posts now occupied by the British on the Western Waters; for the Garrisons of which, the Provisions mentioned in my Letter to you from Saratoga were designed, and which will therefore become in a manner useless to the public, if they cannot be relinquished or disposed of. My...
In consequence of intelligence just received from the Northward, that General Haldimand would not enter into any negociations with the Baron Steuben for delivering up the Western Posts, I find it proper to put a stop to all operations which are carrying on for the purpose of transporting Garrisons & Stores to them, this Fall; You will be pleased therefore to give directions for suspending all...
I have been duly favoured with your Letter of the 15th covering the extract of a Letter from Lt Colo. Depeyster and the Copy of a Letter from Brigr Genl McLean. I have also just heard of the return of the Baron Steuben, without having been able to accomplish the business of his Mission. In consequence of which and of the advanced season of the Year, I have judged it impossible to take...
Having just received the inclosed Letter from the Chevalier Heintz, containing propositions to Congress respecting the admission of a Number of American Characters as Members of an Order lately instituted in Poland, together with a List of the present Knights of the Order; I think it my duty to submit the Originals in the state they came to my hands to the consideration of Congress, and to...
Mrs Washington informs me that you have been kind enough to offer her a recipe for the Colic—She has had a very distressing Night with it, which must be my apology for the trouble I now give you in applying for it. I have the honor to be with great respect Madam Yr Most Obedt Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
The Gentleman who will have the honor of presenting this to you, delivered me the inclosed (original) Letter . The House of Robert Cary Esqr. and Co. of which Mr Welch was one, was very respectable—I corrisponded with it many years, and had most of my Goods there from. Mr Moore wishing to be introduced to you carries with him in the inclosed recommendation all the knowledge I have of him for I...
By His Excellency George Washington Esqr. General & Commander in Chief of the Forces of the United States. Whereas George Shafner Esqr. Major in the American Legion Commanded by Brigr Genl Armand Marquis de la Rouerie, hath served in the Army of the United States from a very early period of the War with Great Britain, in the several grades of Leiutenant, Captain, & Major; and whereas he hath...
I cannot but think it essential that Congress should be informed of the disposition and conduct of the British Officers at the Western Posts, of our frontier Inhabitants, and of the Savages, in order that adequate Measures may be taken to avail ourselves of any favorable circumstances to prevent Hostilities, and place that extent of Territory which is ceded to us, under some proper...
I am too sensible of the honorable reception I have now experienced, not to be penetrated with the deepest feelings of gratitude. Notwithstanding Congress appear to estimate the value of my life beyond any services I have been able to render the U. States yet I must be permitted to consider the Wisdom and Unanimity of our National Councils, the firmness of our Citizens, and the patience and...
I have been favord with your Letter of the 12th of this month. Not having heard from the Quarter Master General since I had the pleasure to write to you on the 6 Inst.—and the season advancing so rapidly—I thought it highly necessary before I left the No. River, to begin the necessary preparations for Garrisoning the Western Posts—to do this I was obliged to call on Governor Clinton to advance...
I receive with the utmost satisfaction & acknowledge with great sensibility your kind congratulations. The prosperous situation of our public affairs, the florishing state of this place, & the revival of the Seat of Literature from the ravages of War, encrease to the highest degree, the pleasure I feel in visiting (at the return of Peace) the scene of our important military transactions, and...
Your several Letters of the 19 20 & 21 of this month are come to hand. My Papers being yet behind, prevents a reference to my last letter to you from Newburg but, if I recollect, it is explicit as to the number of Troops and the necessity of their immediate March—the purpose for which they were ordered on will not admit delay, and I must desire that not only Sprouts Regiment—but as many more...
I inclose to your Care my Answer to the Address of the Magistracy and Inhabitants of the Borough of Elizabeth which I pray you will have the goodness to communicate to them. With great esteem and regard I have the honour to be &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
It gives me the most pleasing sensations to find so cordial a welcome on my return, in peace, to this pleasant Town, after the vicissitudes of so long and obstinate a Contest. On this happy occasion, suffer me, Gentlemen, to join you in grateful adoration to that divine Providence, which hath rescued our Country from the brink of distruction, which hath crowned our exertions with the fairest...
By His Excellency George Washington Esqr. General & Commander in Chief of the Forces of the United States. Whereas Monsr Rochefontaine hath served as Capt. in the Corps of Engineers from the Month of April 1778 until the Month of Novr 1781 when he was promoted to the rank of Major in the Service of the United States: and whereas he hath been principally with the Army under my immediate Orders,...
By His Excellency George Washington Esqr., General & Commander in Chief of the Forces of the United States. It having been represented to me from good Authority, that Mr Timothy Brinley Mount, the Bearer of this, late from Monmouth in N. Jersey State, but some Time residing in the City of N. York, has been a good friend to the Cause & Liberties of the United States, havg been of particular...
I have received with satisfaction your favor—congratulating me on the happy return of Peace, & the prospects of Returng to our former Walks of Life. I take pleasure in complying with your Request of a Recommendation to the Citizens of America—as I am happy to find, by the Concurrent Testimony of many of our suffering Brethern, & others, that you have invariably through the most trying Times,...
If my Letter from Albany by the Count del Vermé has reached you, it would inform you that I had just made the tour of the Northern & Western parts of this State, & had got that far on my return home. Accordingly, the day following I arrived at this place & found your Aunt but just recovering from a Fever & severe Cholic which had reduced her much. Since then she has had a relapse, and is at...
32General Orders, 17 August 1783 (Washington Papers)
The Commander in Chief having been requested by Congress to give his attendence at Prince Town, proposes to set out for that place Tomorrow—but expects to have the pleasure of seeing the Army again before he retires to private life—During his absence Major General Knox will retain the Command of the Troops, and all Reports are to be made to him Accordingly. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Captain Vincent is come here, with some of the St Francois Tribe of Indians, to receive the pay he says is due to a Company he has had in service under your Direction, and in pay, agreeable to a Resolve of Congress. Whatever pay they are entitled to by the Resolve, will undoubtedly be given them; but before the Pay Master General can settle their Accounts, they must produce some Voucher to...
Under the urgent necessity of making immediate preparations for occupying the Western Posts as soon as they shall be evacuated by the Enemy, which was stated very fully in the Letter I had the honor to address to your Excellency a few day ago by Col. Humphrys; I consider myself obliged to request in the most pressing manner that you will advance five hundred Pounds or a larger sum if...
To make preparation for garrisoning the Posts which will be ceded to us by the British on the Western Waters, is now the greatest object that can claim our attention—On this subject I wrote to you yesterday, and desired you to make the necessary Arrangements in the Ordnance Department—I have now to repeat the request, that, as soon as the Boats proper for service on the Lakes can be repaired,...
You are hereby directed to repair immediately to the Northward, in order to make Arrangements for transporting the Garrisons and Stores to the Western Posts. You will on your way, wait upon His Excellency Governor Clinton and receive such Sum of Money as he shall direct to be paid in consequence of the Letter I shall write to him by you; which is to be appropriate in the best and most...
I have been greatly disappointed in not seeing you before my departure from this place—in consequence of your absence I have been obliged to send one of your Assists to the Northward to make provision for garrisoning the Western Posts—as that business could be delayed no longer—I need not say how much more satisfactory it would have been that the execution of this important business should...
Captain Vincent with three of the St Francois Tribe of Indians have been here some days and now tell me they are going to Albany. Captain Vincent says he has had a Company in service during the War and Claims the ballance of Pay due them; but as he has brought no Voucher to Shew how many Men he has had or how long they have been employed, no settlement can be made with them and of this I have...
This will be delivered to you by Mr Mix Asst Q. M. Genl who in the absence of the Quartr M. Genl is charged with making provision for the transportation of the Garrisons and Stores to the Posts on the Western Waters, he has instructions to consult with you respecting a Contract for so many Batteaux as he can ensure the means of payment; he will also make arrangements for the transportation...
Your Ideas of the Ordnance that would be proper for the Garrisons of Niagara and Oswego accord very fully with my own—but, ere the arrival of the definitive Treaty, the season will be so far advanced, and we shall then have so many difficulties to encounter before we can establish ourselves at those Posts; that I think we must be contented for the winter with two Howitzers at each; and such a...
I have lately been favord with a Letter from you dated 28th of Feby in the present year; and as it is impossible for me, by any personal enquiries or application, to assist you in the recovery of your Brother ’s Debts, I have transmitted your Letter and Acct to an acquaintance of mine in Norfolk in Virginia, Thos Newton Esqr.—a Gen’man of character; & one who must have been intimately...
Enclosed, I give you the trouble of a Letter from a Miss Janet Dalgleish to me. As it is totally out of my power to render her any Service in the collectn of her debts but wish to put her in the way to obtain Justice, or at least to obtain a knowledge of the Situation of her Brothers Affaires I take the liberty of requesting that you would drop her a line of information on this Subject. I have...
By the last post, I was honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 1st instt, enclosing the resolve of Congress, directing my attendance at Princeton—notwithstandg my Horses had arrived but a Day or two before, & were much fatigued, I should have set out immediately: had it not been for the indisposition of Mrs Washington, who, during my Absence, had been seized with a fever had a return of...
Upon my return from a Tour to the Northern & Western parts of this State I found your Letter of the 23d Ulto but not in time to give you an acknowledgement by the last Post, and to thank you for your attention to my Commission—I now do it—& by this opportunity have requested the Superintendent of Finance to repay you the Sums which you have advanced for my use; with a Commission thereon. but...
Your Letter of the 23d July was handed to me on my Return from the Northward. The advanced Season of the Year makes it absolutely necessary that the Troops and every thing destined for the Posts on our Western Frontiers, should be put in a situation to move, the moment we can learn when the British will evacuate them. I must therefore desire you to order back four or five hundred Men of your...
I have received your letter of the 30th Ulto with a Catalogue of my Books—When you go next to Abingdon, see if there is any there with my name or Arms in them, & forwd the list. I am truly unfortunate that after all the expence I have been at about my House, I am to encounter the third Edition, with the trouble & inconvenience of another cover to it, after my return. That there can have been...
I have received a call from Congress to repair to Princeton; whether for any special purpose, or generally to remain there till the definitive Treaty shall arrive, the Resolve is not expressive. I mean therefore, if the intention of that body is not more fully explained in a few days, to go prepared for the latter so soon as I can adjust matters here, and Mrs Washington’s health (for at...
Since my return from the Northward I have made particular enquiry into the state of the Boats which may be rendered fit for service on the Western Waters, and find the number very small that are capable of being repaired, the expence of effecting which & transporting them to Schenectady it is imagined will equal or exceed the cost of building new Ones at that place. I have also written by the...
My outfit for the Army in 1775. the Expenditures on my journey to Cambridge (in which those of General Lee, & both our Suits were included)—and the Expences of my Household for some time after my arrival there was borne, as will appear by my Accts (which are now ready for examination) & from the dates of the public advances to me—by my private purse—the amounts of these Expenditures is yet due...
It was not ’till Yesterday that I received your favor of the 25th of June—I now acknowledge the receipt of it, and thank you very sincerely, for the kind Expressions of Benevolence & regard which you are pleased to extend to me, And to assure you, that I shall retain a cheerfull remembrance of your past Services, and wish you every felicity in your future Life. I take pleasure in sending you...