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    • Washington, George
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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Stirling, Lord (né William Alexander)" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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Having received undoubted Intelligence of the fitting out of a Fleet at Boston, & of the embarkation of Troops from thence, which from the Season of the year and other circumstances must be destined for some Expedition, South of this; And having such Information as I can rely on, that the Inhabitants of Long Island or a great part of them, are inimical to the rights & liberties of America, &...
I have Stronger reasons Since I Last wrote to you, to Confirm me in my oppinion that the Army under General Howe, is on its departure, all their movements pronounce it, but Lest it may be but a feint, I must Continue on my guard, & not weaken my Lines too much, untill I have a Certainty of their departure, it is given out, that they are bound to Halifax, but I am of opinion that Newyork is the...
I am now to acknowledge the receipt of your favour of the 11th Instant & to give you my congratulations upon your late appointment by the Honourable Congress. If the intelligence is true and to be depended on, which was brought by the Gentn to New York, I think with you, that we shall have an Opportunity of securing & putting the Continent in a tolerable posture of defence, and that the...
Since my Last to you of the 19th instant, I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 15th it gives me vast Satisfaction to find you are makeing Such preparations as will prevent the enemy from makeing any Lodgment there the reinforcement gon to you from this Camp will put you on So respectable a footing; that I have no doubt, but you will be able to Strengthen your works, in Such a manner...
I take this earliest opportunity to acquaint you that the Men of War and Transports with the Ministerial Troops sailed this afternoon from Nantasket Harbour. There is only a Man of War and two or three other armed Vessels now remaining there. In consequence of this movement I have ordered a Brigade to march to morrow morning for New York, and shall follow with the remainder of the Army as soon...
I crave your refference to my Last to you of the 24th instant, Since which I am honord with your Lordships favour of the 20th—it gives me much pleasure to find that you are makeing Such good preparations for the Reception of the enemy, who have this day entirely quitted this harbour, a Brigade under General Sullivan will Set off on the Morrow to your assistance I will not be Long after, with...
My Lord: Upon your representation of Capt. Butler’s state of health, I think it will be best to give him a discharge, tho the loss of an officer whose character for diligence and fidelity stands fair, is at all times to be regretted and never more than at the present. With respect to Col. Parke if the circumstances of his affairs render it absolutely necessary that he should have leave of...
The General desires that Brigadiers Lord Sterling, Mercer, Stephen & de Fermoy do, respectively, Quarter their Brigades in Houses or Hutts as compactly as possibly, that they may be soon form’d, and ready for action at the shortest notice of the approach of the Enemy. Each Brigadier is to take care of his own Front, and keep strong Guards at all the convenient passing places—the intermediate...
Lest the Enemy should in some degree avail themselves of the Knowledge (for I do not doubt but that they are well informed of every thing we do) I did not care to be so particular in the General orders of this day, as I mean to be in this Letter to You. As mutch Tim⟨e⟩ then would be lost (in Case the Enemy should a⟨ttem⟩pt crossing the River at any pass within your ⟨guard of⟩ it) in first...
Repair with all possible expedition to Genl Lee’s Camp—Know his Situation, Numbers, &ca—Send Officers you can confide in to Genls Gates, & Heath, to be informd of their numbers, condition & when they may be expected at Pitts Town. Use every possible means without regard to expence, to come with certainty, at the Enemys strength, situation and movements—without this we wander in a Wilderness of...
A report is currt here wch gives me much pain. it is, that in consequence of some Orders of your Lordship, or dispute with the Militia, five or Six hundred of them have gone home in disgust—turn’d others back which were coming on and spread universal uneasiness and dissatisfaction as they travel’d. I hope the report is without foundation; unhappy will it be for us if it is not, when we stand...
You are to repair to Baskenridge and take upon you the command of the Troops now there, & such as may be sent to your care. You are to endeavour, as much as possible, to harrass and annoy the Enemy by keeping Scouting parties constantly (or as frequently as possible) around their Quarters. As you will be in the Neighbourhood of Genls Dickenson and Warner I recommend it to you to keep up a...
I was last night favoured with your Letter of the 24th Instt. I concur in your Lordships proposition so far as it goes for incorporating the three Companies of Virginia Volunteers and forming them into a Batallion; But tho I have a high opinion of the conduct, merit & bravery of Captn Thruston, in whose behalf you have interested yourself, and would wish to do him any Favor, I cannot appoint...
Letter not found: to Major General Stirling, 23 Mar. 1777. Stirling wrote to GW on 24 Mar. that “I have Just now received your Excellencys letter of Yesterdays Date.”
It is with pain, I inform you, that a complaint has been made to me of your having treated Mrs Livingston with a degree of roughness and indelicacy, which I am convinced, your cooler reflexion must condemn. Conscious that you have too much regard for your Character as a Gentleman, and too nice a sensibility of the impulses of humanity, deliberately to commit an indiscretion of the kind, I can...
Yours reached me so late last Night that it was impossible to send off the provision before this Morning, and I hope th[at] Genl Maxwell will not be obliged to return for want of it. Had the day been good, the whole Army would have moved down towards Metutchin disencumbered of Tents or Baggage, and would then have acted as Circumstances would have permitted, the Moment the weather is such that...
We have received intelligence from the Northward that the Enemy are operating against Ticonderoga and it’s Dependencies—I have therefore to request of you that you will keep your Division together as much as possible, except those two Regiments detached as parties of Observation—and that you will endeavour to obtain every intelligence of the motions of the enemy on Staten Island and if...
I am favd with yours by Major Howell. I would have forwarded your Baggage immediately to you, but I think the chance of your returning is at least equal to your staying where you now are. The greatest part of the fleet have fallen down from the narrows towards the Hook, but whether they have gone out to sea we cannot discover. If they should have gone out, and have stood to the Southward, you...
Since my last to you, dated at Gallaways in the Clove, I have March’d one division of the Army to this place whilst two others proceeded to Chester, to be ready to March by a back road to Philada (if need be) or to cross at New Windsor, if the Enemy, contrary to our present expectation, should attempt to operate up the North, or East Rivers. I have to request, that your Lordship would apply to...
Yours of the 24th overtook me at this place. Genl Green’s division will reach Morris Town this Evening. Genl Stephen’s and Genl Lincoln’s march thro’ Chester by an upper Road. I have no objection to your Lordship’s taking the Rout you mention, and as it will bring you near New Ark and Elizabeth Town, I have sent orders to Colo. Dayton to endeavour to procure certain intelligence of the Number...
I was this morning favoured with yours of the 26th. I am surprized to hear Colo. Morgans Corps was at Heckensack when you mention. I should suppose your information premature, having sent Orders to him to march the moment I had intelligence of the Fleet’s sailing and having written to him since. Your going to Baskenridge must depend on the information you receive from Colo. Dayton respecting...
Upon your Arrival at Trenton you are to halt till you receive further orders. I do not think it prudent to advance the Army beyond Delaware before the Enemy enter the Capes, which they have not yet done. Should the Fleet come into the Bay we can be down below Philada before they can make any disposition for an attack either by land or Water, or should they return we shall be so far upon our...
Yours of the 28th from Elizabeth Town, did not reach me untill this morning. From the conclusion of it, I am apprehensive that you intend to halt at Bound Brook for further orders, but I hope that will not be the case, as it was my intention that you shou’d march immediately by the nearest rout to Delaware, provided the expedition to Staten Island did not take place. The part of the River to...
I have desired Genl Gates to give you immediate information of the arrival of the Enemy’s Fleet in Delaware, upon which you are to move down to Philada with all the Troops at Trenton. My former directions were to wait orders of march from me, but you are now to attend to those of Genl Gates. Be pleased to communicate this to the Officers commanding the different Corps and desire them always to...
Letter not found: to Maj. Gen. Stirling, 25 Aug. 1777. The 13th Antiquarian Booksellers Association catalog, 1970, item 586, includes the following excerpt from this letter signed, which was written at Wilmington, Del.: “The Enemy are landing, as you will be informed by the enclosed Copy of a Letter, which came this afternoon by Express to Brigad’r Gen’l McKinlay. I request . . . you march...
Letter not found: to Major General Stirling, 27 Aug. 1777. Stirling wrote GW on 30 Aug. : “I thank you kindly for your letter of the 27th.”
The principal reason for halting the Army here to Night, is, that the Enemy from every Information I have receivd this day, have not advancd towards Phila. it follows I think, evidently (especially if it be true that part of them are at Bonners House where we dind) that this Army, and not the City, is their object; & of course that we should not be too far advanced towds them till our strength...
Since I have seen Captn Faulkner, and by him learnt the situation of Genl McDougal, I am really uneasy to find how low he is down & near to the Enemy (if they continue in the same position they were this morning). Captn Faulkner says your Lordship proposed to send an officer to conduct him by some upper Road, but lest any other business should have withdrawn your attention from this matter, I...
I have your favor of 8 Oclock now before me, & am surprized to find the Enemy in the same situation after the movement which they appear’d to be making, according to the Information given by Genl Reed. I am sorry the Piquets March’d from hence yesterday, & I am still more concern’d that Genl Armstrong with the Militia moved to the Trap as it was owing to a mistake they were not halted along...
Letter not found: to Major General Stirling, 1 Nov. 1777. Stirling wrote to GW on 3 Nov. that “Your Excellency’s letter of the first Instant, I received yesterday.”
Letter not found: to Major General Stirling, 26 Dec. 1777. In his second letter to GW of 26 Dec. , Stirling wrote that “I have Just received your Excellencys letter of this date.”
Your Lordships Letter of yesterday arrived late last night —with respect to the proposed Attack upon the detached body of the Enemy, it appears from Major Clarks account of their Situation whom I sent for to consult upon the Subject—that they can be so easily and readily reinforced from the main body as to render any attempt upon them abortive —The business of your inclosed Letter has been in...
I have received your Letter dated this day at noon and the pieces of Intelligence inclosed in it—your Lordship will act according to circumstances—I altogether approve of what you propose to be done with respect to those persons who have been detected in traiterously furnishing the Enemy with Provisions—the Punishment falling upon one or two Individuals of note will probably strike a Terror...
When you shall have received certain intelligence of the Enemys retiring to Philadelphia—it will be expedient to march your Division and the different parties that were detached to join you with all convenient speed back to Camp—that they may as soon as possible be refreshed and provide for their Winter Shelter—this was intended to have been mentioned in this mornings Letter—but was omitted —I...
The bearer presents the horse to you, which I offered in exchange for your black —In the Summer, when I first got him, he had the appearance of a fine, and handsome horse—at present (by neglect at Bethleham) his appearance is altered. He was purchased for me by Colo. Moylan as a horse of Six yrs old, & I believe him to be sound, knowing nothing to the contrary. he goes rough, equal I believe...
In answer to your favor of this date give me leave to say that I am well pleased at the termination of your corrispondance with Colo. Wilkinson—I sent for that Gentn after the conversation had with your Lordship, & showed him the Letters wch Mr Harrison furnished you with a sight of. he seemed a good deal surprized at G——s’s Letters & was not at all sparing in his abuse of him & C——y. The...
You will be pleased to assemble the Brigadiers and commanding Officers of Brigades, to take into consideration the inclosed Letter from Mr Blaine and determine on the most effectu⟨al⟩ Remedy for the evil which he complains of —While you are together there is another matter of importance which I would have you employ your thoughts upon—from the present facility of procuring passes to cross the...
When your Lordship proposed meeting at General Knox’s Quarters to deliberate on the Subject of my propositions, I readily assented, without attending closely to the matter, or considering how far it accorded with my ideas & views; I therefore, as it is by no means my intention to have the collective opinion of the Officers upon the points mentioned would wish the meeting might be avoided, and...
I do not conceive my self authorized to direct payment of such Acct as your Lordship inclosed me, however just and reasonable they may be, referring the Claimants to Congress, always; If your Lordship chooses it, I will transmit your Acct & Letter to that body; but should think the chance of payment, or a knowledge of the decision upon it, would be greater, were you to inclose it to some...
I have received your Letter of yesterdays date. I had no particular person in view when I issued the order respecting the slow progress of the works, at the same time, I acknowledge, that I am exceedingly mortified at seeing, & beholding the delay of them—whether unavoidable, or not, I do not undertake to determine. Colos. Brealey & Barber informs me that the Officers of their Regiments are...
Altho Col. Meade has already signified to you my desire that our present Camp should be minutely reconnoitred—it is a matter of such serious importance that I cannot forbear repeating to you my wish that yourself aided by General du Portail and some other officers would critically examine the position, all it’s avenues, and the adjacent ground—that in case we should have occasion to make use...
I desire that you and the General Officers upon the Court Martial would meet here at five OClock this Afternoon, when the other General Officers will be assembled, to consider of some measures that respect the Army at large. I would submit it to the Court, whether it would not be more convenient to adjourn to the plains, where the Witnesses may be attending their respective duties, and be at...
You are tomorrow morning at the hour appointed for marching; with the second Line, to take the route by Doctor Daytons at North Castle—Elijah Hunters at Bedford—second Bridge over Croton River—Lt Samuel Haits—Capt. Browns —and Wilsons Tavern to Fredericksburg—if any better road can be pointed out, that will not be liable to the objection of interfering with the Columns commanded by Generals De...
I have just received intelligence of the enemy having thrown a body of about 5,000 men over to Paules Hook, and of their advancing about five miles towards the English neighbourhood —I have also intelligence (from Gen. Scott) that about 3,000 men with artillery &ca were advancing from Kingsbridge —The design of these movements is probably a forage, and the gathering of Stock—&ca. It may also...
I have just received letters from Generals Maxwell and Winds, that the Militia of Jersey are ordered out in very considerable force. A part has already collected. Besides the Militia, there will be two Continental brigades under Generals Maxwell and Woodford. This makes it necessary there should be some officer of higher rank than any now there to take the direction of the whole. Your knowlege...
You will proceed forthwith into the State of New Jersey and take the command of the Troops there. These will consist of two continental Brigades under Brigadier Generals Maxwell and Woodford, and such of the Militia of the State as shall be collected on the occasion. General Maxwell has been directed to move and take post on the heights west of Acquaquenunk Bridge—General Woodford is to...
I have been favd with yours of the 30th Sepr and 1st instant from Kakeate. You will make such a disposition of the troops as shall seem to you most eligible for your own security and for checking the excursions of the enemy. The inclosed for General Maxwell directs him to obey your orders. You will therefore draw up such part of his Brigade as you shall think proper. He and all the people...
It is now three days since I have received any Intelligence from Your Lordship —this makes me the more uneasy as my movements depend altogether upon the indications of those of the enemy—it is of so much importance to me to be regularly informed—that I must request you will send expresses daily—acquainting me precisely with the enemys position, and communicating such intelligence as you may...
I have this morning received a letter from Gen. Gates which has the following paragraph. “Two sailors belonging to Cape Cod who made their escape from the prison ship last monday night arrived here; they declare that the British fleet of men of war sailed ten days ago in quest of the french fleet.” Altho’ there is a certain want of probability in the relation, yet as it may be true, you will...
I have had just now the honor of your letters of the 4th & 5th Inst. As we are often obliged to reason on the designs of the enemy from the appearances which come under our own observation and the information of our spies we cannot be too attentive to those thing[s] which may afford us new light. Every minutiæ should have a place in our collection—for things of a seemingly triffling nature...