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The horse I borrowed of you the other day giving out while we were on Staten Island, my servant exchanged him there for another. The one he took in lieu of him I now return. I believe the public will lose nothing by the exchange. I omitted informing you that a couple of horses which I received here from Col Abeel on my way to the French fleet were on my return delivered at this place to Lt Col...
I really do not think it would be an adviseable measure to detach a brigade, for though I should not apprehend any material danger here, yet I think without some substantial object, it would hardly be prudent to lessen our force. There are possible events that might at least embarrass us. But my principal objection arises from my considering a compliance rather as a bad precedent; if you yield...
There has just been unfolded at this place a scene of the blackest treason, Arnold has fled to the Enemy. André the British Adjt Genl is in our possession as a Spy. This capture unravelled the mystery. West Point was to have been the Sacrifice, all the dispositions have been made for the purpose and ’tis possible, tho’ not probable to night may still see the execution. The wind is fair, I came...
The General has given me some memorandums for instructions to you on the subject of the Northern preparations. He is however undecided on one point—How far the preparation for vessels ought to be pushed. It was his wish when the resolution to discontinue the former plan was taken to stop the provision for the vessels as well as other matters; and he is only induced to depart from this idea in...
Lt. Whitehead undertakes to go tomorrow morning early with some important dispatches for The General to Philadelphia. You will be pleased to have him furnished with a good horse saddle & Bridle for this purpose. ALS , Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia. Lieutenant James Whitehead, Second Pennsylvania Regiment.
By a letter we have received from General Sullivan it appears that Poor’s Brigade have left their tents behind. The General requests you will have them supplied from your nearest deposit, and, in general, that you will make up every deficiency in this article for the expedition as speedily as possible. General Sullivan appears to be very anxious to have his supplies of every kind forwarded to...
[ West Point, July 27, 1779. Document listed in dealer’s catalogue. Document not found. ] ADS , listed by Thomas F. Madigan, New York City, in Autograph Notes , I (January-February, 1919), 3, Item 203. Greene, a Rhode Island Quaker who served in the state militia in 1774 and 1775, was appointed a brigadier general in the Continental Army on June 22, 1775. After the British evacuated Boston in...
The General requests you will send some discreet person to Brunswick to ascertain the No of Boats in the River. A countryman that is judicious & trusty would give less suspicion than an officer. It should if possible be a person acquainted with the place. His inquiries will be the more easily accepted. The more hurry & dispatch the better. DS   Yr obt Serv JCH Transcripts John C. Hamilton...
His Excellency requests you will direct a couple sets of tools provided and sent to General McDougall to blow up rocks which greatly impede his carting &c. I am Sir   Yr. Most Obedt ALS , Library of the American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia.
I inclose you a couple of letters from Mr. Carter one for yourself, the other for Mr. Kenlock. There is nothing for me to add, except that I wish you when the business shall be transacted to transmit the bond to me under cover to General Schuyler at Albany. I expect to leave this shortly for that place and to remain there ’till New York is evacuated; on which event I shall set down there...
Points submitted to the consideration of the Council— Our force stated at 10.300 The enemys at 12.000 —At stoney Point— 1300   Verplanks— 700 2000— Main body at Philips &c— Questions—What general dispisition of our army should be made—Whether any and what Offensive movements can be undertaken against the enemy at the present juncture?— Whether the muster Masters department is necessary?...
I acknowlege myself to have been unpardonably delinquent in not having written to you before; but my matrimonial occupations have scarcely left me leisure or inclination for any other. I must now be brief as the post is just setting out. I shall shortly write you at large. I have not been much in the way of knowing sentiments out of the army; but as far as I am acquainted with them either in...
The General requests you will let him know your opinion of the number of expresses necessary to be kept in constant pay, considering the late regulation of the post office. You know the necessity of œconomy and he is persuaded will rate the number as low as possible. You will have in view the occasional employment of trusty serjeants. He is writing to Congress. Dr Sir   Your most Obedt & very...
Congress are equally affected and alarmed by the information they have received that the Legislature of your state at their last meeting have refused their concurrence in the establishment of a duty on imports. They consider this measure as so indispensable to the prosecution of the war, that a sense of duty and regard to the common safety compel them to renew their efforts to engage a...
By His Excellency’s command, I am to acknowledge the receipt of yours per Mr. Grace. Colo. Biddle has given Mr. Grace an order to make use of the waggons at Hackets Town, for the purpose of transporting the twelve boats you mention. The General expects it will be done with all possible dispatch, as it is absolutely necessary we should have all the boats we can collect at and about Coryel’s...
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey, May 30, 1777. By Washington’s orders Hamilton wrote to Grice, assistant deputy quartermaster general, ordering the removal of all boats in the Delaware from Trenton up to Coryells. Letter not found. ] GW John C. Fitzpatrick, ed., The Writings of George Washington (Washington, 1931–1944). , VII VIII , 144, note 29. Coryell’s Ferry, located on the New Jersey side of...
By His Excellency’s command, I inclose you a Resolve of Congress of the 16th of December last, by which you will find that Capt. McLane’s Company late of Pattons Regiment is annexed to the Delaware Battalion in the arrangement of the Regs. therefore under your Command, you are to Comprehend Captn. McLane and his Officers. I am, Sir,   Your most Obdt. Servt. Alexr. Copy, Delaware State...
In my last letter My Dearest Angel I informed you that there was a greater prospect of activity now than there had been heretofore. I did this to prepare your mind for an event which I am sure will give you pain. I begged your father at the same time to intimate to you by degrees the probability of its taking place. I used this method to prevent a surprise which might be too severe to you. A...
[ Head of Elk, Maryland, September 5, 1781. On September 6, 1781, Hamilton wrote to Elizabeth Hamilton : “Yesterday … I wrote to you … to the care of Mr. Morris.” Letter not found. ]
Yesterday, my lovely wife, I wrote to you, inclosing you a letter in one to your father, to the care of Mr. Morris. To-morrow the post sets out, and to-morrow we embark for Yorktown. I cannot refuse myself the pleasure of writing you a few lines. Constantly uppermost in my thoughts and affections, I am happy only when my moments are devoted to some office that respects you. I would give the...
I wrote you my beloved Betsey by the last post, which I hope will not meet with the fate that many others of my letters must have met with. I count upon setting out to see you in four days; but I have been so frequently disappointed by unforeseen events, that I shall not be without apprehensions of being detained, ’till I have begun my journey. The members of Congress are very pressing with me...
I wrote you two days since My Dear Betsey, but as I am informed by one of the Gentlemen at Head Quarters that there is an opportunity for Philadelphia, I embrace it with that pleasure which I always feel in communicating with you. You complain of me my love, for not writing to you more frequently, but have I not greater reason to complain of you? Since I left Kings ferry, I have received three...
Your letter of the 3d. of September my angel never reached me till to day. My uneasiness at not hearing from you is abated by the sweet prospect of soon taking you in my arms. Your father will tell you the news. Tomorrow Cornwallis and his army are ours. In two days after I shall in all probability set out for Albany, and I hope to embrace you in three weeks from this time. Conceive my love by...
I thank you my beloved for your precious letter by the post. It is full of that tender love which I hope will characterise us both to our latest hour. For my own part I may say, there never was a husband who could vie with yours in fidelity and affection. I begin to be insupportably anxious to see you again. I hope this pleasure may not be long delayed. I wish you to take advantage of the...
I have received my angel two letters from you since my arrival in Camp with a packet of papers, and I have written to you twice since I saw you. I acquainted you with the assurances that had been given me with respect to command, and bad you dismiss all apprehensions for my safety on account of the little prospect of activity. With no object of sufficient importance to occupy my attention here...
The day before yesterday, my angel, I arrived here, but for the want of an opportunity could not write you sooner. Indeed, I know of none now, but shall send this to the Quarter Master General to be forwarded by the first conveyance to the care of Col. Hughes. Finding when I came here that nothing was said on the subject of a command, I wrote the General a letter and enclosed him my...
I am just arrived My Love at this place and shall cross Kings ferry tomorrow. I am much pleased with the horses; they are both free and gentle; and I think you will learn to have confidence in them. I am perfectly well, and as happy as I can be when absent from you. Remember your promise; don’t fail to write me by every post. I shall be miserable if I do not hear once a week from you and my...
I had written the inclosed My Dear Betsey when the appearance of your father’s horses announcing his speedy approach induced me to defer sending it off. I flattered myself for a moment that my Betsey would accompany him; but alas! the hope was in vain. It was not my Betsey’s fault however, but the advice of her parents that prevented my seeing her. They were right my angel to dissuade you from...
I have received my beloved Betsey your letter informing me of the happy escape of your father. He showed an admirable presence of mind, and has given his friends a double pleasure arising from the manner of saving himself and his safety. Upon the whole I am glad this unsuccessful attempt has been made. It will prevent his hazarding himself hereafter as he has been accustomed to do. He is a...
How chequered is human life! How precarious is happiness! How easily do we often part with it for a shadow! These are the reflections that frequently intrude themselves upon me, with a painful application. I am going to do my duty. Our operations will be so conducted, as to economize the lives of men. Exert your fortitude and rely upon heaven. Hamilton, History John C. Hamilton, Life of...
[ Camp before Yorktown, Virginia, October 10, 1781. On October 12, 1781, Hamilton wrote to Elizabeth Hamilton : “I wrote you two days since.” Letter not found. ]
Two nights ago, my Eliza, my duty and my honor obliged me to take a step in which your happiness was too much risked. I commanded an attack upon one of the enemy’s redoubts; we carried it in an instant, and with little loss. You will see the particulars in the Philadelphia papers. There will be, certainly, nothing more of this kind; all the rest will be by approach; and if there should be...
I arrived My Dear Betsey at this place yesterday Evening not so much fatigued as I expected to have been but with my Cold somewhat increased. I am however better to day and hope to finish my business so as to return on Thursday. If a Vessel offers at the time and a fair wind I may take that mode of conveyance. I hope you have been attentive to your medicine. Remember Mrs. Powel on the...
Engrossed by our own immediate concerns, I omitted telling you of a disagreeable piece of intelligence I have received from a gentleman of Georgia. He tells me of the death of my brother Levine. You know the circumstances that abate my distress, yet my heart acknowledges the rights of a brother. He dies rich, but has disposed of the bulk of his fortune to strangers. I am told he has left me a...
⟨The post my⟩ angel has met with some interruption (I suppose by the river being impassable) which deprives me of the pleasure of hearing from you. I am inexpressibly anxious to learn you have began your journey. I write this for fear of the worst, but I should be miserable if I thought it would find you at Albany. If by any misapprehension you should still be there I entreat you lose not a...
If Congress have not yet left Philadelphia, they ought to do it immediately without fail, for the enemy have the means of throwing a party this night into the city. I just now crossed the valleyford, in doing which a party of the enemy came down & fired upon us in the boat by which means I lost my horse. One man was killed and another wounded. The boats were abandon’d & will fall into their...
I did myself the honor to write you a hasty line this Evening giving it as my opinion that the city was no longer a place of safety for you. I write you again lest that should not get to hand. The enemy are on the road to Sweedes ford, the main body about four miles from it. They sent a party this evening to Davesers ferry, which fired upon me and some others in crossing it, killed one man,...
I left camp last evening and came to this city to superintend the collection of blankets and cloathing for the army. Mr. Lovel sends to inform me there is an express going off to Congress, and I do myself the honor to communicate a brief state of things, when I left camp. The enemy moved yesterday from where they lay opposite to valley forge &c. higher up the river on their old scheme of...
Persuaded my Dear Sir of your punctuality, of your disposition to oblige me and to promote public business, I am at a loss to explain to my self the reason of your silence on the letter of which the foregoing is a triplicate. I hope the ill state of your health has not been the cause of it. The Governor informed me that returns on the files of the Legislature would answer most of the inquiries...
Mr. Morris, some time since, in a circular letter to the states, among other things, requested to have an account of all the money, provisions, transportation, &c., furnished by this state to the United States, since the 18th. of March, 1780. I have been very happy to hear, that this business has been intrusted to your hands, for I am sure, feeling its importance, you will give it all the...
It is his Excellency’s desire, that you have all the public boats below the falls, removed as expeditiously as possible to Coryells ferry, or higher, as you may think necessary for their safety. Their present situation exposes them to being destroyed or taken without much difficulty, and we should feel the loss of them. I am Sir   Your most Obd Serv ALS , George Washington Papers, Library of...
By command of the General I am to request you will receive the following alterations to the instructions given you of the 12th Inst. To deliver all the horses you collect to the Quarter Master Genl or his assistant. To deliver all the Cattle unfit for immediate use to the Contractor of the County, who will dispose of them in some safe place till further orders. I am Sr &ca. DLC : Papers of...
Springfield [ New Jersey ] June 14, 1780 . Orders Heard to deliver all horses to the quartermaster general and “all the Cattle unfit for immediate use to the Contractor of the Country.” Df , in writing of Richard Kidder Meade, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Signature in Meade’s writing is “AH, ADC.” When this letter was written, Heard was in Pompton, New Jersey.
His Excellency commands me to acknowlege the receipt of your letter of this day with two prisoners. He says he spoke to you to day on the points mentioned in your letter which probably was written antecedent to your interview. Lt Col Loring is to be tried by a Court Martial of the line. Capt Forrest, under the peculiar circumstances represented by Col Putnam, to be indulged with a furlough. I...
[ New Windsor, New York, June 27, 1779. ] Acknowledges receiving two letters from Heath addressed to George Washington. ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. Letters not found.
[ West Point, July 26, 1779. ] Requests Heath to attend “a Council to be held at Head Quarters this afternoon.” ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. On the same day, H wrote a similar, but slightly differently worded, letter to Brigadier General Anthony Wayne ( ALS , Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia).
I am commanded by The General to inform you that Lt. Col Gouvion and Capt Rochefontaine will march with the detachment under the Marquis De la Fayette. Major Villefranche will shortly return to the post of West Point. I have the honor to be Sir Yr. most Obed ser ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. Heath was in command at West Point. Etienne Nicolas Marie Béchet, Chevalier de...
His Excellency orders me to acknowlege the receipt of your two letters per bearer. The intended march of your division tomorrow morning prevents a particular reply to the points mentioned in one of them. I have the honor to be   Very Respectfully   Sir   Your most Obedt servant ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. On July 5–11, 1779, the British made a maritime raid on the...
I take the liberty to trouble you with a letter for Mr. Dana, which I have left open for your perusal; and I request it as a favour which I hope I may claim from your friendship to deliver it to him and press for a speedy answer. I think you sufficiently know my character and way of thinking to be convinced I could never have expressed sentiments of the kind imputed to me; and you will...
The bearer Abby Mot is a soldiers widow in great distress who wants to go to her friends in the Jerseys but has not the means. If you could find her a place in some public waggon going that way, you would do an act of charity. I am Sir Yr. Obed ser. ALS , Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, Buffalo, New York. Hodgdon was commissary general of military stores. In 1789 H paid Abby Mott’s...