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1) Dr. Pierre Van Cortlandt Cr. £     1784 Feby To this sum due for the Clerkship of his son P. V. Cortlandt commenced 150     Dr. Jacob LeRoy & Sons Cr. 1784 To this sum due for the Clerkship of his son Jas. LeRoy commenced this day 150     this sum given up as Mr. LeRoy did not continue his Clerkship 150     May To opinion given in the case of Kelly & Lot 1.10.0 
I arrived My Dear Betsey at this place yesterday Evening not so much fatigued as I expected to have been but with my Cold somewhat increased. I am however better to day and hope to finish my business so as to return on Thursday. If a Vessel offers at the time and a fair wind I may take that mode of conveyance. I hope you have been attentive to your medicine. Remember Mrs. Powel on the...
The State of New York, To Alex. Hamilton, Dr. 1783 July 30 To my allowance as a delegate of Congress from the 25 of November 1782 to this day £496 at 5 dollars per day—248 days both days included. Days of travelling in going and coming, 14 days at ditto   28 524 Credit By an order from Col. Udney Hay on Mr. Comfort Sands 200. Also from Col. Hay part of an order for 200 in favour of Mr. Floyed...
Albany, August 30, 1783. Asks Canfield to sell a farm which belongs to John Carter and is located in Salisbury, Connecticut. ALS , Courtesy of the Sons of the Revolution, Headquarters, Fraunces Tavern, New York City. Canfield, a lawyer in Sharon, Connecticut, was a member of the state legislature. John B. Church.
[ New York, August 30, 1783. On the envelope of a letter which Soderstrom wrote to Hamilton on August 4, 1793 , Hamilton wrote: “Answered 30th by the post.” Letter not found. ]
Mrs. Hamilton has requested her sister who left this a few days since on her way to Philadelphia to purchase a few articles there for her, and if she found it necessary to apply to you for the money. I will be obliged to you to advance it on my account and I will in a short time repay it. We have accounts here that induce us to believe Carleton has received final orders for the evacuation of...
Albany, August 20, 1783. Requests information concerning 40,000 acres of land in Tryon County on which Abel James holds a mortgage. ALS , New-York Historical Society, New York City.
[ Albany, August 20, 1783. On August 20, 1783 , Hamilton wrote to Philip Van Rensselaer: “I send you a line to the Governor.” Letter not found. ]
I find on examination that the Cash I could spare is so trifling that it would be of little use to you. I send you a line to the Governor which is at your service. I imagine there may be about £50 due me. The letter accompanying this gives the Govr. an account of the time I was at Congress. He will calculate according to the allowance made by the state. If I can dispose of a bill on...
I arrived here two days ago. Being in company with Mrs. Schuyler I was induced, in complaisance to her, to pass through New York. But I was sorry not to find any satisfactory ground to believe that the suspicions entertained of the arrival of the definitive treaty were well founded; though Rivington when it is mentioned to him shrugs up his shoulders and looks significantly; and Sir Guy has...
Mrs. Schuyler having some business in this city obliged me to pass into it. I do not find that the definitive treaty is here, though I am inclined to believe that definitive orders have been received respecting the evacuation, and advice of the sailing of a fleet of transports for that purpose. A new embarkation of German troops is going on. But upon the whole I do not imagine the evacuation...
[ New York, August 3, 1783. Letter not found. ] “General Hamilton to Governor George Clinton,” Columbia University Libraries.
[ New York, August 2, 1783. On August 14, 1783 , Chaloner wrote to Hamilton: “Your favr of the 2nd. reached me the 12th Instant.” Letter not found. ]
Whereas in the opinion of this Congress the confederation of the United States is defective in the following essential points, to wit: First and generally in confining the power of the fœderal government within too narrow limits, withholding from it that efficacious authority and influence in all matters of general concern which are indispensable to the harmony and welfare of the...
However men actuated by private pique or party views may take pleasure in stigmatizing the conduct of Congress with or without reason, considerate and good men who are solicitous for the honor of their country will act upon very different principles. They will view with regret those instances in which the measures of that body may be really intitled to blame, will be cautious how they bestow...
A few days since I was honored with Your Excellency’s letter of the ; and was glad to find your ideas on the subject corresponded with mine. As I shall in a day or two take leave of Congress, I think it my duty to give my opinion to the legislature on a matter of importance to the state, which has been long depending and is still without a prospect of termination in the train in which it has...
Philadelphia, July 26, 1783. Receipt for papers relating to lands in the Otsego Patent which had formerly belonged to George Croghan and which were mortgaged to William Franklin. ADS , anonymous donor. James was a Philadelphia merchant and land speculator. This document concerns a complicated and protracted dispute over several large tracts of land located in the vicinity of Lake Otsego and...
Though I have not performed my promise of writing to you, which I made you when you left this country, yet I have not the less interested myself in your welfare and success. I have been witness with pleasure to every event which has had a tendency to advance you in the esteem of your country; and I may assure you with sincerity, that it is as high as you could possibly wish. All have united in...
It happens My Dear Sir that both Mr. Maddison and myself are here. We have talked over the subject of your letter to him, and need not assure you how happy we should both be to promote your wish; but the representation continues so thin, that we should have little hope that any thing which is out of the ordinary course and has somewhat of novelty in it could go through. We therefore have...
The Committee on the letter from the Secretary at War respecting Lt Col Ternant submit the following [r]esolution: That Lt Col Ternant be informed that Congress in continuing General Armand in the command of his corps at the time of his promotion to his present rank had reasons of a peculiar nature without any intention derogatory to the merit of Lt. Col Ternant of whose useful and...
I wrote you my beloved Betsey by the last post, which I hope will not meet with the fate that many others of my letters must have met with. I count upon setting out to see you in four days; but I have been so frequently disappointed by unforeseen events, that I shall not be without apprehensions of being detained, ’till I have begun my journey. The members of Congress are very pressing with me...
That it be recommended to the several states to liquidate & settle the accounts of the depreciation of the officers employed in the Mustering department on the same principles as have been observed in liquidating & settling those of other officers of the army. AD , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives; copy, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. The...
On my arrival in this city I am more convinced than I was before of the necessity of giving a just state of facts to the public. The current runs strongly against Congress and in a great measure for want of information. When facts are explained they make an impression and incline to conclusions more favourable to us. I have no copy of the reports in my possession, which puts it out of my power...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in Hamilton’s hand. Cover missing. Docketed by JM, “Alex. Hamilton Philadelphia July 6h. 1783.” On my arrival in this city I am more convinced than I was before of the necessity of giving a just state of facts to the public. The current runs strongly against Congress and in a great measure for want of information. When facts are explained they make an...
Whereas by the Confederation the assent of nine states is requisite to the determination of matters of principal importance to the United States and the representation in Congress has for some time past generally consisted of less than that number of states in consequence whereof the public business at an interesting juncture has suffered and continues to suffer great delay and embarrassment:...
[ Princeton, New Jersey ] July 2, 1783 . On this date, John Francis Mercer moved that Congress adjourn and return to Philadelphia. This motion was written and seconded by Hamilton. AD , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
That Major General Howe be directed to march such part of the force under his command as he shall judge necessary to the state of Pensylvania; in order that immediate measures may be taken to confine and bring to trial all such persons belonging to the army, as have been principally active in the late mutiny, to disarm the remainder and to examine fully into all the circumstances relating...
That Major General Howe be directed to march such part of the force under his command as he shall judge necessary to the State of Pensylvania; and that the Commanding Officer in the said state be instructed to apprehend and confine all such persons, belonging to the army, as there is reason to believe instigated the late mutiny; to disarm the remainder; to take, in conjunction with the civil...
It is proper I should inform Your Excellency that Congress have lately removed to this place. I cannot enter into a detail of the causes; but I imagine they will shortly be published for the information of the United States. You will have heared of a mutiny among the soldiers stationed in the barracks of Philadelphia, and of their having surrounded the state house where Congress was sitting....
I am informed that among other disagreeable things said about the removal of Congress from Philadelphia it is insinuated that it was a contrivance of some members to get them out of the state of Pensylvania into one of those to which they belonged and I am told that this insinuation has been pointed at me in particular. Though I am persuaded that all distinterested persons will justify...
FC ( LC : Hamilton Papers). Lacks salutation and the signature has been excised. Dated by Hamilton, “Princeton June 29. 178[3],” and docketed by him, “1783 29 June—To Mr Madison abt. the removal of Congress.” 29 June 1783. Several circumstances appear to warrant the belief that Hamilton did not post this letter: (1) the RC is not among the Madison Papers in the Library of Congress; (2) in his...
The Committee appointed to confer with the Supreme Executive Council of Pensylvania on the practicability of taking effectual measures to support the public authority, in consequence of the disorderly and menacing appearance of a body of armed soldiers surrounding the place where Congress were assembled on Saturday the 21st instant beg leave to report: That they had a conference the morning...
Whereas a body of armed soldiers in the service of the United States quartered in the barracks of this city having mutinously renounced their obedience to their officers did on Saturday the twenty first instant proceed under the command of their sergeants in a hostile and threatening manner to the place in which Congress were assembled and did surround the same with guards, and Whereas...
The Committee appointed to confer with the Supreme Executive Council of this state, respecting the practicability of taking effectual measures for supporting the public authority, violated by the mutinous behaviour of a body of armed soldiers, who surrounded the place where Congress and the Executive Council of this state were assembled on saturday last in a hostile and menacing manner—not...
We have the honor to inclose for Your Excellency and the Council a copy of the resolutions communicated in our conference yesterday. Having then fully entered into all the explanations which were necessary on the subject, we shall not trouble your Excellency with a recapitulation. But as the object is of a delicate and important nature, we think it our duty to request the determination of the...
Resolved that the President and Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania be informed that the authority of the United States having been this day grossly insulted by the disorderly and menacing appearance of a body of armed soldiers about the place within which Congress were assembled, and the peace of this City being endangered by the mutinous disposition of the said troops now in the...
The Committee to whom you were referred the letters & papers communicated to Congress by the Executive council of Pensylvania, through their delegates report. That they had a conference yesterday as directed with the Supreme Executive Council, in which in the first instance the propriety of calling out a detachment of Militia to intercept the mutineers on their march from Lancaster was...
Information having been received, that a detachment of about Eighty mutineers are on their way from Lancaster to this place, you will please to proceed to meet them and to endeavour by every prudent method to engage them to return to the post they have left. You will inform them of the orders that have been given permitting them to remain in service ’till their accounts shall have been...
The Committee on the letter from General Washington report: Resolved that copies of the letter from the Commander in Chief of the 7th. instant with its inclosures be transmitted to the several states for their information and that their attention be recalled to the resolutions of the 2d of May last to facilitate the punctual payment of the notes issued to the army on account of their pay. That...
The Committee observe with respect to a military peace establishment, that before any plan can with propriety be adopted, it is necessary to inquire what powers exist for that purpose in the confederation. By the 4th. clause of the 6th article it is declared that “no vessels of war shall be kept up by any state in time of peace, except such number only as shall be deemed necessary by the...
Resolved that the Ministers Plenipotentia[r]y be instructed in case they should comprise in the definitive treaty any stipulations amounting to a recognition of the rights of neutral nations, to avoid accompanying them by any engagements which shall oblige the contracting parties to support those stipulations by arms. AD , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. This resolution...
In two or three letters, which I have had the honor of writing to Your Excellency lately, I mentioned the necessity of a representation of the state here and at the same time of my returning to my private occupations. I am obliged to inform Your Excellency that I cannot remain here above ten days longer. I have the honor to be Yr. Excellency’s Most Obed ser ALS , Blumhaven Library and Gallery,...
The inclosed letter is for Mr. Bowman who married Mrs. Cattle. I am told he is at Alexandria which make me trouble you with the letter. Should he have left that place for South Carolina, I will thank you to forward it to him. No definitive treaty yet arrived nor any thing else of importance new. I write in Congress & have only time to add that I am   Yr. sincere & affectionate friend ALS ,...
I inclose you a couple of letters from Mr. Carter one for yourself, the other for Mr. Kenlock. There is nothing for me to add, except that I wish you when the business shall be transacted to transmit the bond to me under cover to General Schuyler at Albany. I expect to leave this shortly for that place and to remain there ’till New York is evacuated; on which event I shall set down there...
The Committee appointed to consider of the best manner of carrying into execution the engagements of the United States for certain allowances of land to the army at the conclusion of the war submit the following resolution: Congress having by their resolution of the promised certain allowances of land to all officers, and to such soldiers of the United States engaged to serve during the war,...
Mr. Livingston having signified to Congress his desire of relinquishing the exercise of the office of foreign affairs and his intention of returning to the state of New York: Resolved that the secretary of Congress be directed to receive the papers of the said office into his care, ’till a successor to Mr. Livingston can be appointed and that next Wednesday be assigned for the election of a...
In my last letter to Your Excellency I took occasion to mention that it was of great importance to the state, at this time to have a representation here as points in which by its present situation it is particularly interested are dayly and will be dayly agitated. It is also of importance at this moment to the United States (not only from general considerations but) because we have a very thin...
[ Philadelphia ] May 30, 1783 . On this date a committee, consisting of Hamilton, Oliver Ellsworth, Ralph Izard, James Madison, and Benjamin Hawkins, reported on “what further steps are proper to be taken … for carrying into effect the stipulations contained in the articles between the United States and Great Britain.” The committee recommended that the states execute the articles of the...
That a Committee be appointed to consider of the best manner of carrying into execution the engagements of the United States for certain allowances of land to the army at the conclusion of the war. AD , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. In September, 1776, Congress, to encourage enlistments in the Continental Army, had offered bounties of land to all officers and soldiers...
Resolved that General Washington be informed in answer to his letter of the that it is the desire of Congress the evacuation of New York and its dependencies may not be retarded by a preference to that of any other place. AD , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. Space left blank in MS. On May 14, 1783, Washington wrote to the President of Congress: “I shall wait the...