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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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Amsterdam, 18 January 1781. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, III, f. 87–44. printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 4:235–238. Read by Congress on 19 Nov., this letter consisted of English translations of two placards or edicts of the States General dated 12...
Question 20. Has there not been different opinions in Congress, with Regard to this, (i.e. to Proposals appearing fair, which were not so) from whence Animosities have arisen? There has never been any Difference of Sentiment in Congress, Since the Declaration of Independancy, concerning any Proposals of Reconciliation. There has been no Proposals of Reconciliation made, Since the 4. of July...
I yesterday received yours of the 19 of October. Sometime Since I received the other of the 19th. of August. Both went to Paris and I being here, Mr. Dana and Mr. Thaxter forwarded, their Inclosures, according to my desire, but I am not able to say in what Vessel. In Consequence of Mr. Laurens’s Misfortune, I am ordered to reside in Holland for the present, and should be glad to be informed by...
Your first Letter to me is now before me. The true Cause why General Frie, has not received from me, any particular Intelligence, is that the Matter has been hitherto Suspended, and that I am under Such Engagements of Secrecy, that I could not in Honour acquaint him with any Thing that has pass’d in Congress. As Soon as I arrived in Philadelphia, I made it my Business to introduce General...
Mr. Archibald Buchannan, and Mr. Walter Tolley both of Maryland, and hearty Friends of America, introduced to me by my Friend Mr. Chace Chase , are bound to the Camp, and Mr. Chace requested a Letter from me. Chace is a Man of common sense. I received your Packett. I am obliged to you for opening the Letter from our Friend Mr. Adams, and if you had opened all the others, you should have been...
This day, I think, has been the most remarkable of all. Sullivan came here from Lord Howe, five days ago with a Message that his Lordship desired a half an Hours Conversation with some of the Members of Congress, in their private Capacities. We have spent three or four days in debating whether We should take any Notice of it. I have, to the Utmost of my Abilities during the whole Time, opposed...
I read in a great Writer, Montesquieu that “l’honneur, en imposant la loi de servir, veut en être l’arbitre; et, s’il se trouve choqué, il exige ou permet qu’on se retire chez Soi.” C’est une des Règles suprêmes de l’honneur, Que lorsque nous avons été une fois placés dans un rang, nous ne devons rien faire ni souffrir qui fasse voir que nous nous tenons inferieurs à ce rang même.” These being...
The Weather still continues cloudy and cool and the Wind Easterly. Howe’s Fleet and Army is still incognito. The Gentlemen from South Carolina, begin to tremble for Charlestown. If Howe is under a judicial Blindness, he may be gone there. But what will be the Fate of a scorbutic Army cooped up in a Fleet for Six, Seven or Eight Weeks in such intemperate Weather, as We have had. What will be...
Paris, 23 April 1780. LbC ( Adams Papers ). Although a note to the Letterbook copy of Adams’letter of 3 May to the president of Congress (No. 58, calendared, below) indicates that this letter was sent and the Journal of Congress shows it to have been received on 19 Feb. 1781 ( JCC Worthington C. Ford and others, eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 , Washington, 1904–1937; 34...
60January 21. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
Went to Versailles to pay my Respects to the King and Royal Family, upon the Event of Yesterday. Dined with the foreign Ambassadors at the C. de Vergennes’s. The King appeared in high Health and in gay Spirits: so did the Queen. M adam e Elizabeth is grown very fat. The C. D’Artois seems very well. Mr. Fitsherbert had his first Audience of the King and Royal Family and dined for the first time...
611779. April 15. Thursday. (Adams Papers)
Dined at home.
Yesterday noon, Mr William Vaughan of London, came to my House, with Mr Laurens, the son of the President, and brought me a Line from the latter, and told me, that the President was at Harlem, and desired to see me. I went out to Haerlem and found, my old Friend at the golden Lyon. He told me that he was come partly for his Health and the Pleasure of seeing me and partly, to converse with me...
63[April 1783] (Adams Papers)
Mr. Hartley met Mr. Franklin, Laurens, Jay and me, at my Lodgings, and shewed Us an Instruction under the Kings Privy Seal, and signed George Rex, in which his Majesty recites that he had appointed Mr. Hartley his Minister Plenipotentiary to treat with Us &c. The American Ministers unanimously required a Commission under the great Seal, and promising to ratify what he should do.—Mr. Hartley...
I received in Time, your Letter of the 29 of June, and should have answered it before, but upon Searching for the Lease, I found it has been mislayed in removing from Amsterdam, and my Secretary has been Sick and absent, So that I have not been able to find it. I consent that Messrs Willinks, Van Staphorsts and De la Lande and Fynje, Should pay you, the f491:12s, in Addition to the Arrears of...
65[Tuesday March 26, 1776.] (Adams Papers)
Tuesday March 26, 1776. Congress were informed of the Death of Governor Ward and on
The Postmaster at N. York, in a Panick, about a fortnight ago fled to Dobbs’s Ferry, about 30 Miles above N.Y. upon Hudsons River, which has thrown the Office into disorder, and interrupted the Communication so much that I have not received a Line of yours, since that dated the Second of September. Nor have I received a News Paper, or any other Letter from Boston since that date. The same...
Terms in this Article, equivocal and indefinite. Jefferson. The Limits of the Southern Colonies are fixed.... Moves an Amendment, that all Purchases of Lands, not within the Boundaries of any Colony shall be made by Congress, of the Indians in a great Council.— Sherman seconds the Motion.... Chase. The Intention of this Article is very obvious, and plain. The Article appears to me to be right,...
It is now no longer a Secret, where Mr. Hows Fleet is. We have authentic Intelligence that it is arrived, at the Head of Cheasopeak Bay, above the River Petapsco upon which the Town of Baltimore stands. I wish I could describe to you the Geography of this Country, so as to give you an Adequate Idea of the Situation of the two great Bays of Cheasopeak and Delaware, because it would enable you...
I have at last recieved Letters from Mr. Dana. Mr. Sayer arrived in town yesterday with Letters to me, and dispatches for Congress, which I shall transmit by the best opportunity. Three days before I had recieved a Letter which came by Sea, but had been almost four Months upon the passage. Mr. Dana appears to be in good Spirits. He has communicated himself to the Marquis de Verac, and has been...
This Letter is intended to go, by Monsieur Le Veillard, a Young Gentleman bound to America, with Design to travail with engage in the service of Mr. Holker or to lay the Foundations of a mercantile House either in France or America, as Circumstances may be. I have the Pleasure to know his Father and his Family and the young Gentleman very well: They are all worthy and amiable, and have on many...
Dr. Jackson, by whom this will go, is a Manager of the State Lottery, and is bound to the New England states, to forward the Sale of the Ticketts. He wishes to be recommended to proper Persons for the Purpose. If you can assist him with your Advise you will do a public service. I can give you no News—but the Skirmish at Spanktown. This State of Pensilvania, have at last compleated their...
I have an Account of the Politicks of the Town of Braintree; but it is an imperfect one. I wish you would write me, a clear, and distinct one. . . . I am told there was a Tie, between your Hon. Brigadier General and You, and that, in order to get a Decision in his Favour he was obliged to declare that he would leave the Board for the Sake of serving the Town. I should be glad to learn a little...
You have been so good, in sending me the Journals and above all in sending me very particular Intelligence of what has passed upon several occasions that I depend much upon the Continuance of your Favours. An early receipt of the Journals will be a great Advantage to me, and I shall not fail to make a good Use of them. Since I have been here, I have seen Mr. I. and mentioned to him, his famous...
741783 Feb. 24. Monday. (Adams Papers)
Dined in Company with Mr. Malesherbes, the famous first President of the Court of Aids, Uncle of the Chevalier de la Luzerne, and Son of the Chancellor de la Moignon. He is about half Way in Appearance, between Mr. Otis and Mr. A. Oliver. F ranklin this Morning mentioned to me the Voyage de la Fonte, who mentions a Captain Chapley, and a Seymour Gibbons. F. thinks it is translated from the...
I condole with you most affectionately and cordially in your fresh disappointment. It is to be hoped the Tide will turn. I have recd, Letters for You from Govr Reed, with a desire to open them in case of your being gone. You were gone, and I opened them and read them, with infinite Pleasure. They contain the best Account of American affairs that I have seen. The substance of them, is Advising...
76[July 7. 1778.] (Adams Papers)
July 7. 1778. Dined at St. Lu, with the Farmer General De Chaillut. The aged Marshall Duke Richelieu, and many others Marquisses, Counts and Abbys were there.
771778. 14. Feb. Saturday. (Adams Papers)
A very fine Morning, the Wind at Northwest. At Daybreak orders were given for the Ship to unmoor. My Lodging was a Cott, with a double Mattress, a good Bolster, my own Sheets, and Blanketts enough. My little Son, with me—We lay very comfortably, and slept well. A violent Gale of Wind in the Night.
AL : Harvard University Library Mr. Adams has recd. from the Count De Vergennes a Letter containing Information that his Majesty will see Mr. A. on Fryday, and an Invitation from the Count to Messrs. Franklin Lee and Adams to dine with him on that Day. The Letter is addressed to Messrs Franklin Lee and Adams. Notation: 5 May 78 Elicited by Vergennes’ note to the commissioners the day before....
Your two last Letters had very different Effects. The long one gave me vast Satisfaction. It was full of usefull Information, and of excellent Sentiments. The other relating to the ill Usage you have received from Hayden gave me great Pain and the utmost Indignation. Your generous Solicitude for our unfortunate Friends from Boston, is very amiable and commendable, and you may depend upon my...
Your obliging Favour of 17 June is now before me. It contains an elegant and masterly Narration of the late Expedition against the British Men of War, in Nantaskett Road, and its happy and glorious Event. I am a little mortified however that my good Friends and Neighbours the Militia of Braintree, Weymouth and Hingham, did not execute their Part with So much Activity, as they ought. But the...
Your Letter of March 11th, which I recieved last night, is totally incomprehensible to me. My Account was to be made up for two Years Salary ending the 13th. day of last November, amounting to five thousand pounds sterling. Every farthing of Money I have recieved, including my last Receipt for 400 £ amounts to but about that Sum. I transmitted You the account between Us stated with all...
Paris, 8 April 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC , No. 84, I, f. 433–435). printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 3:602. In this letter, received by Congress on 19 Feb. 1781, John Adams provided a list of forty-six British naval vessels lost for a variety of reasons...
I am desirous of conveying to you, in a manner that will not probably fail of success, and therefore have written the same Thing by many Vessells. I have ordered some Things to be shipped to you by two Opportunities. But least these should not arrive, or whether they do or not, I beg of you to draw upon me, for one hundred Pounds sterling which shall be paid at sight. Any Person who has...
I have received your Letter, giving an Account of your Studies for a day. You should have dated your Letter. Making Latin, construing Cicero, Erasmus, the Appendix de Diis et Heroibus ethnicis, and Phaedrus, are all Exercises proper for the Acquisition of the Latin Tongue; you are constantly employed in learning the Meaning of Latin Words, and the Grammar, the Rhetorick and Criticism of the...
Duplicate The Memoire of the Prince Gallitzin, Envoy Extraordinary of all the Russias to the States General, presented the third of this Month, is of too much Importance to the United States of America, and their Allies, to be omitted to be sent to Congress. It is of the following Tenor. High and Mighty Lords., “The Undersigned, Envoy Extraordinary of her Majesty the Empress of all the...
I have received your Favour, written after your Return from Spa and am very glad you had so pleasant a Tour and found So agreable a Reception. I find that my Friend in Philadelphia, reprinted the Letters on the Spirit and Resources of Great Britain: after which they were again printed in Boston, and much admired. A Gentleman from Boston, tells me, he heard there, that they were written by one...
The Writer on the Consequences of American Independence, Subjoins a Comparison between the United States, and the West Indies. He says the Exports from England was in 1771 £ s d To North America 4,586,882: 15: 5   £ To Dominica 170,623: 19: 3 To St Vincents 36,839: 10: 7 To Grenada 123,919:
I can never Sufficiently regret, that this Congress have acted So much out of Character, as to leave the Appointment of the Quarter Master General, Commissary of Musters and Commissary of Artillery to the General; As these officers, are Checks upon the General, and he a Check upon them: there ought not to be too much Connection between them. They ought not to be under any dependance upon him,...
891778 Octr. 22. Thursday. (Adams Papers)
William Whitmarsh Jur., born in Braintree, maried and living in Marblehead, was taken Prisoner on board the Yankee Privateer, Captain Johnson. After having taken two Ships, the Prisonors rose upon them, and carried them to England. Carried to Chatham and put on board the Ardent 64 Gun Ship, Captn. Middleton. Next put on board the Mars 74, from thence on board the Vultur sloop for Spithead. At...
As you seem so inquisitive about Politicks, I will indulge you so far (indulge, I say, observe that Word indulge! I suppose you will say it ought to have been oblige) as to send you a little more News from abroad. As foreign Affairs are now become more interesting to Us than ever, I dare say your political Curiosity has extended itself e’er this all over Europe. The Agent of the King of...
Paris, 8 March 1780.. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC , No. 84, I, f. 311). LbC ( Adams Papers ); notation in Thaxter’s hand: “March 10th. Delivered the above to Mr Brown of Charlestown S. Carolina.” printed : Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 3:539. In this letter, read by...
92Dec. 26. Thursday. (Adams Papers)
Mr. Brantzen call’d upon me, at one. He says that Mr. Fitzherbert and he are yet a great Way asunder. The first Point of the Freedom of Navigation sticks. The other Points they have agreed on, or may agree on, not being far off. Mr. F. has no Answer from London to the Dutch Propositions. I told him he might make himself very easy about the Freedom of navigation, for that the English must come...
I have not received my Letters of Recall from Holland and therefore must disappoint you and my self. I have requested them anew and Suppose I shall receive them about Christmas, but whether I do or not, I shall come home, at latest in the first Spring ships, unless I should receive Some new Commission in Europe, which is not likely. I am unalterably determined not to stay in Holland where I...
94[May 4.] (Adams Papers)
May 4. Dined at Mr. Chaumonts with his Family, and other Company.
I had yesterday the honour of your letter of July the eleventh, and I feel myself much obliged, by your kind attention to me and my family, but much more by your care of the public safety, and the judicious and important observations you have made. Your letters Sir, so far from being “a burden,” I consider as an honour to me, besides the pleasure and instruction they afford me. Believe me,...
Wednesday July 31. 1776. The Board of War brought in a report, which was taken into Consideration: whereupon Resolved as in the Journal. A Committee of the whole on the Articles of Confederation Mr. Morton in the Chair. JCC Worthington C. Ford and others, eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789, Washington, 1904–1937; 34 vols. , 5:623. Concerning “musquet powder” for Washington’s...
I am So little acquainted with the Language and Usages of this Country that I am under a Necessity of troubling some Gentleman so much as to ask the favour of his Advice and Assistance, in order to pass through the Kingdom of Spain, in my Way to Paris. I therefore beg the favour of you to inform me, whether I can have Carriages, Horses Mules &c. in this Place, to carry me to Bayonne, Bilboa,...
Yours of 26 March came by this days Post. Am happy to hear you have received so many Letters from me. You need not fear Writing in your cautious Way by the Post, which is now well regulated. But if your Letters should be intercepted, they would do no Harm. The F armer turns out to be the Man, that I have seen him to be, these two Years. He is in total Neglect and Disgrace here. I am sorry for...
99[February 1778] (Adams Papers)
Captain Samuel Tucker, Commander of the Frigate Boston, met me, at Mr. Norton Quincy’s, where We dined, and after Dinner I sent my Baggage, and walked myself with Captain Tucker, Mr. Griffin a Midshipman, and my eldest Son, John Quincy Adams, between 10 and 11. Years of Age, down to the Moon Head, where lay the Bostons Barge. The Wind was very high, and the Sea very rough, but by Means of a...
100[May 9. Saturday. 1778.] (Adams Papers)
May 9. Saturday. 1778. This morning Mr. Joy, Mr. Johonnot, and Mr. Green Son of Mr. Rufus Green came to visit me. The American Ministers dined with Madam Bertin, at Passi. This Lady is married to a Nephew of Mr. Bertin the Minister, and he holds some lucrative office under the Crown. She has a fine Person and an excellent Understanding. Her Husband is however said to be a great Libertine worn...