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Two Days ago, I was favoured with your polite and elegant Letter of January 22. I have received so many of your Letters, within a few Months, containing such important Matter, in So masterly a style, that I am ashamed to confess I have answered but one of them, and that only with a few Lines. I beg you would not impute this omission to Inattention, Negligence, or Want of Regard, but to its...
The Marquiss, who loves Us, will deliver You this. He will tell You every thing. Arbuthnot, Rodney and Walsingham are to be pitted against de la Motte Piquet, Guichen and Ternay in the West Indies. So that I hope, You will be pretty quiet. Prepare however to co-operate and rout them out of the Continent if possible. Above all let me beg of You to encourage Privateering. The French will be...
Yours of June 23d. have received. I believe there is no Danger of an Invasion your Way, but the Designs of the Enemy are uncertain and their Motions a little misterious. Before this Letter is sealed, which will not be till Sunday next, I hope I shall be able to inform you better. I rejoice at your fine Season, and still more at my Brother Cranches Attention to Husbandry. Am very glad he bought...
41779. July 20. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
I was struck with these Words in a Letter from the President Jeannin to M. Bellegarde of 28 Jany. 1609 Si le Roy “est content de ma Conduite, et de la Diligence et Fidelitè, dont j’use pour executer ponctuellement ce qu’il m’a commandé c’est deja une Espece de recompense qui donne grande Satisfaction à un homme de bien; et quand il ne m’en aviendra rien de mieux, j’en accuserai plutot mon...
Saturday June the 3d 1775. Congress however ordered the Letter to lie under on the Table for farther Consideration. On Saturday June the 3d 1775. The Letter from the Convention of the Massachusetts Bay dated the 16th. of May, being again read, the Subject was again discussed, and then Resolved That a Committee of five Persons be chosen, to consider the same and report what in their Opinion is...
This is one of my fortunate days. The Post brought me, a Letter from you and another from my Friend and Brother. The particular Account you give me of the Condition of each of the Children is very obliging. I hope the next Post will inform me, that you are all, in a fine Way of Recovery. You say I must tell you of my Health and Situation. As to the latter, my Situation is as far removed from...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I never was more amuzed with political Speculations, than Since my Arrival in this country.— Every one has his Prophecy, and every Prophecy is a Paradox.— One Says America, will give France the Go By. Another that France and Spain, will abandon America. A Third that Spain will forsake France and America. A Fourth that America, has the Interest of all Europe...
This Letter will go by the Hand of the Honourable Samuel Hewes Esqr., one of the Delegates in Congress from North Carolina, from the Month of September 1774, untill 1777. I had the Honour to serve with him upon the naval Committee, who laid the first Foundations, the Corner Stone of an American navy, by fitting to Sea the Alfred, Columbus, Cabott, Andrew Doria, Providence, and several others....
I had, by yesterdays Post, the Honour of your Letter of the 15th. instant. I Should esteem it an Honour, and an Happiness, to discharge the friendly Trust of Executor to Mr. Quincys Will, (because I have a great Respect to his Memory and a great Regard for his Family,) if my Situation and Circumstances were such that I could possibly accomplish it, with Advantage to the Interest of the Family....
It is often Said in this Country, “We have nothing to gain by this War.” But who is to gain? If Holland has nothing to gain, it has much to loose, and the Question now is not what is to be gained, but was it to be Saved and defended. This Republick, may loose all her Possessions in the East and West Indies: she may loose her Navigation and Commerce: she may loose her Baltick Trade: her...
On Thursday October 26. 1775. The Subject again brought on the Carpet, and the same discussions repeated, for very little new was produced. After a long discussion in which Mr. John Rutledge, Mr. Ward, Mr. Lee, Mr. Sherman, Mr. Gadsden, Mr. Dyer, and some others had spoken on the same Side with me, Congress resolved that a Committee of five members be appointed to take into Consideration, the...
I have not received a Line, nor heard a Syllable from you Since my Arrival, but I know your incessant Application to things of the first Moment, and therefore presume you have good Reasons. Our Ennemies are Still in a Delirium: and are pleasing themselves with Hopes that Clinton will be more bloody than How. Nothing is so charming to their Imaginations as Blood and Fire. What an Heart must...
13Avril 15. Mecredi. (Adams Papers)
Went Yesterday to return the Visits, made me by American Gentlemen. Dined this Day, with Madam Helvetius, one Gentleman, one Lady, Dr. F., his G. Son and myself made the Company—an elegant Dinner. Mm. is a Widow—her Husband was a Man of Learning and wrote several Books. She has erected a Monument to her Husband, a Model of which she has. It is herself, weeping over his Tomb, with this...
14Tuesday May 6. (Adams Papers)
Dined at Mr. Jays. Lt. General Mellville, who is here to solicit for the Inhabitants of Tobago, the Continuance of their Assembly and Tryals by Jury, was there.
My Health has lasted much longer, than I expected but at last it fails. The Increasing Heat of the Weather added to incessant application to Business, without any Intermissions of Exercise, has relaxed me, to such a degree that a few Weeks more would totally incapacitate me for any Thing. I must therefore return home. There will be no difficulty, in finding Men Suitable to send here. For my...
This Express carries a new Plan of an Army. I hope the General Court without one Moments delay will Send Commissions to whole Corps of their Officers, either by Expresses or Committees to New York and Ticonderoga, that as many Men may be inlisted without delay as possible. It may be best to send a Committee with full Powers to each Place. There is no Time to be lost. I inclose you a sett of...
17May 5. Tuesday. (Adams Papers)
Am to dine at home—a great Rarity and a great Blessing! At Dinner, alone, my Servant brought me a Letter, A Messieurs, Messieurs, Franklin, Lée, et Adams, Deputés des Etats unies de l’Amerique a Passy. De Vergennes.—I opened, and found it in these Words J’ai pris les ordres du Roy, Messieurs, au Sujet de la presentation de M. Adams votre nouveau Collegue, et Sa Majesté le verra vendredi...
Versailles, 20 January 1783. MS of declarations in French; English translation by John Pintard ( PCC , No. 84, IV, f. 323–330). FC ’s of declarations and Arts. 1 and 22 of the Anglo-French preliminary peace treaty in French ( Adams Papers ). LbC ’s of declarations in French and Arts. 1 and 22 of the Anglo-French preliminary peace treaty in French ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 109. LbC-Tr ’s of...
I have the honor to inclose Copies of some Papers which passed between the Comte de Vergennes and me, lately at Paris. The Conjecture, that the British Court would insist upon their two Preliminaries, is become more probable by the publication of the King’s Speech at the Prorogation of Parliament. “The Zeal and Ardor which You have shewn for the Honor of my Crown,” says the King; “your firm...
Paris, 20 March 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand ( PCC , No. 84, I, f. 337–338). LbC ( Adams Papers ); notation: “No. 22 delivered Mr. Izard.” printed: Wharton, ed., Dipl. Corr. Amer. Rev. Francis Wharton, ed., The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States , Washington, 1889; 6 vols. , 3:561. With this letter, read in Congress on 1 Aug., John Adams sent copies of the London...
Yours of 7 June by Captain Barnes fortunately reached me, Yesterday. I was much Surprised, you may well imagine at its Contents. But I Suppose, the Cause of their not electing you to the Council, must have been your Engagements in the Navy Board. I am unhappy to learn by the Newspapers, that our Constitution is likely to occasion much Altercation in the State, but notwithstanding all our...
It is a long Time Since I have rec d a Line from you, or written you. How go on Affairs on your Side the Water? Are the present Ministers like to hold their Places, or are We to expect more Changes of systems & Agents, before We finish? M r Hartleys disposition is very fair, and if he can follow his own Ideas, We shant be long in settling Accounts I hope. But the Delays the Indecision, the...
I never had the Pleasure of a Correspondence or any particular Acquaintance with you, which can justify the Freedom I have taken of giving you this Trouble: But as the good of our Country, which I know is your first Consideration, is my Motive, I presume you will think it a Sufficient Apology. In the present State of America, which is so novel and unexpected, and indeed unthought of by Numbers...
Dr. £ s d 1777 To Cash Spent from my leaving Home the 9. Jany. 1777 to my Return 27. Novr 1777 exclusive of every Article of Cloathing and exclusive of a Bll flour sent to my family from Baltimore. 312: 14: 0 To Cash paid my servant for Wages and Expences, by Mrs. Adams 7: 16: 8 To Cash due to Mr. Sprout for Board one Week at £4 Pen. currency 3: 4: 0 To Cash due to Mr. Smith for his Account 1: 12:
25Oct. 7. Monday. (Adams Papers)
Mr. D umas has been out, upon the Discovery.—Neither Mr. V. nor Mr. G. could guess the Reason, why their H igh M ightinesses had sent their Agent De Spieringshoek to desire me to postpone the Signature of the Treaty untill tomorrow. Mr. B. whom he met in the Street explained it. He says the Prince had sent Word to their High M. that he desired a Conference with them to day, and as the...
Tuesday. September 17th. 1776. The Committee appointed to confer with Lord Howe, agreable to the order of Congress, brought in a report in Writing, which was read as follows: In Obedience to the orders of Congress, We have had a meeting with Lord Howe. It was on Wednesday last upon Staten Island, opposite to Amboy, where his Lordship received and entertained Us, with the Utmost politeness. His...
I shall address this to you as Speaker, but you may be Councillor, or Governor, or Judge, or any other Thing, or nothing but a good Man, for what I know. Such is the Mutability of this World. Upon my Word I think you Use the World very ill, to publish and send abroad a Newspaper, since the 29 May without telling Us one Word about the Election, where it was held, who preached the sermon, or &c....
Gen. Warren writes me, that my Farm never looked better, than when he last saw it, and that Mrs. —— was like to outshine all the Farmers. —I wish I could see it.—But I can make Allowances. He knows the Weakness of his Friends Heart and that nothing flatters it more than praises bestowed upon a certain Lady. I am suffering every day for Want of my farm to ramble in.—I have been now for near Ten...
The Sovereign of Britain and his Council have determined to instruct their Commissioners to offer you Independance, provided you will disconnect yourselves from France. The Question arises how came the King and Council, by Authority to offer this? It is certain that they have it not. In the next Place, is the Treaty of Alliance between Us and France, now binding Upon Us? I think there is not...
301777 Feb. 16. (Adams Papers)
Last Evening I supped with my Friends Dr. Rush and Mr. Sergeant at Mrs. Page’s over the Bridge. The two Coll. Lees, Dr. Witherspoon, Mr. Adams, Mr. Gerry, Dr. Brownson, made the Company. They have a Fashion in this Town of reversing the Picture of King G. 3d, in such Families as have it. One of these Topsy Turvy Kings was hung up in the Room, where we supped, and under it were written these...