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    • Adams, John
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It is a long Time Since I have rec d a Line from you, or written you. How go on Affairs on your Side the Water? Are the present Ministers like to hold their Places, or are We to expect more Changes of systems & Agents, before We finish? M r Hartleys disposition is very fair, and if he can follow his own Ideas, We shant be long in settling Accounts I hope. But the Delays the Indecision, the...
M r Storer, whom you know, will deliver you this, but whether he will find you at Brussells or else where, I knew not. I begin to grow impatient to See, the definitive Treaty Signed that I may take myself away, from this dull Place. I am just returned from Dinner, with the Sweedish Ambassador, who invited Us all, upon occasion of the Signature of the Treaty, between his Master and Congress,...
I last night received a Letter from a Member of Congress, which informs me, that Congress have resolved to redeem their Loan Office Certificates, according to the Value of Money at the Time of their being respectively issued. This compleats their Plan of the 18 of March, and makes the whole just as well as wise and politick. I Send you, the Report of the Committee as amended and adopted by the...
I have recd your favours of 14 and 26. I thank you for the Extract, and hope you will discover by whom and to whom it was written. I dont See the Virtue nor the Wisdom, nor the Honour of writing Such Things to the English. It would be Sufficient, one should think to write them to America. However, just as they please. As long as they pursue with tryumphant success, the System, which was urged...
Your Letter from Antwerp, of the 5th. which I received last night by Mr. Douglas, was very agreable. The News it contains is very good. But there must be Letters and Papers, with all the Particulars, by such a Number of Vessells. The arrival of all these Vessells is a great Event to the French and American Commerce, and I hope in Time will convince both Parties of the importance of it, and of...
I am happy to find by your favor of the 23 d. that You are safely arrived after a good Journey. It is best I believe that nothing should be said between You two about the Affair in which both have been perfectly innocent. If You go I wish You a good Journey, but cannot warrant You against fresh troubles—for neither the Innocence nor Virtue of Angels would be a Security against them in a World,...
Yours of June 2d., I have just now received that of 27. May I duely received and the other inclosing—the curious Mess from London I received—all safe, in time and untouched. I have never missed a Letter from you. They all come Safe—and the seals in good order. You may write freely I am persuaded. It was, haste, or Inattention that I did not acknowledge them in the one of 28 ultimo. I am...
I have taken my Pen, Simply, to thank you for Several excellent Letters, for the Pamphlets by Mr Myers and the Memoires by Mr Ridley, and to tell you that I am Sick. I Sometimes think I shall die a Martyr to the Dutch alliance, and I declare to you, if it had been the only action of my Life, I should have thought it a Life well Spent, Such are my Ideas of its Importance to the Cause of our...
I thank You for your favour of the 20th. of November. I am really weary of reading such Follies as Motions to address the King for Peace. They are only delusions to the People of England, the People of America, and all the other Nations of the Earth. The Case of Mr. Laurens, and those of Mr. Trumbull and Tyler, among Millions of other Incidents shew, with whom We have to do. The States General...
I have this day the Honour of yours of 5. It would be unwise in Congress, to neglect any Effort to induce other Powers of Europe to acknowledge our Independancy, and therefore I am fully of opinion that at least one Minister Should be sent to treat with the Maritime Powers, or rather the neutral Union. For these Powers will all acknowlege our Independance at once, and none of them will do it...
With great pleasure have I recieved yours of the 19th, with its Inclosures. I wish I could answer more at large, but in addition to a thousand other Objects crowding upon me at present, I have had to write my obscure Name nine and twenty thousand times to Obligations and Coupons, which I expect will give me before it is ended a great Name at least, if not a great deal of Money. I am...
I threatened you with a great deal of Egotism for the public good. I was chosen by my native Town into the Convention 2 or 3 days after my Arrival. I was by the Convention put upon the Committee—by the Committee upon the sub committee—and by the sub Committee appointed a Sub sub Committee—so that I had the honour to be principal Engineer. The Committee made some alterations, as I am informed...
Yours of June 6. is just arrived, with its Inclosure. From the first day of my acquaintance with Mr Laurens to this moment, I know not that I ever Said a disrespectfull or unkind Word concerning him, or entertained an unkind or disrespectfull Thought. I have ever found him and ever represented him as a Man of Honour, Candour, Integrity and abilities, of great publick and private Merit. This...
I have just received the Court Gazette with Clintons Proclamations. I would give any Thing I had time to write you, a whole sheet about Carolina. The Party of Horse, that galloped out—what did they meet with? By the Return of killed, and Prisoners, it must have been the most obstinate and desperate defence that ever was made, or a barbarous and diabolical Massacre—take which you will, and what...
Your two Letters containing the Anecdote and the Preliminaries have been recd., and You have seen the use of them. I have at length a friendly Letter from Mr. Jay, who tells me some good News, which I must not communicate. I have Letters too from Petersbourg with other News. Upon the whole they are consulting upon Preliminaries at Paris, and concerting Plans elsewhere for a Congress. If the...
What are We to infer from the Indecision of the present Ministers?— Do they expect to draw their Country out of her Embarrassments; to preserve her Credit,; to avoid a Bankruptcy; to Settle a Plan with Ireland; to pacify Scotland &c &c &c, by a Sour Countenance towards America? We desire nothing but our natural Advantages in Commerce? if these are refused can it be expected that our People...
In the 116 page of the inclosed Mercury, you will find the Strictures upon Lord G. Germaines nonsense. I dont see them in the English Papers. I suppose no Printer dares insert them. But I Swore they shall be seen, and therefore I beg you to get them inserted in the Leyden or Amsterdam or the Hague Gazette or all three. If it cant be done without pay let them be paid. I will repay in a moment....
I am honoured with yours of 5. You will honour and oblige me much sir, by your Thoughts upon the Subject of European Jealousy and Caprice, hinted at. You will see that the Empress has undertaken to mediate between E. and Holland, but she will not join the Emperors Mediation but on two Conditions Sine quibus non. These are 1. an Acknowledgment by England of American Independance. 2. An...
The Bearer of this Mr. Winslow Warren, is the Son of my Friend Major General Warren of the Massachusetts. He is, on all Sides of Families the most ancient and honourable and meritorious of that Part of America. And the Young Gentn. himself is amiable and has Merit. I should be vastly obliged to you, if you would shew him Brussels. Pray shall We have the Pleasure to see you here in a few days?...
Mr. Bowdoin, a gentleman of Virginia, is passing through Brussells in his Way to France. He is a young American of good Character here, and I have the honour to recommend him to your Notice. Pray what think you, of the Face of affairs? According to present Appearances a year or two more, will probably deliver our country from the Ennemies within it, tho it may not bring Peace. The K. of...
You have very much obliged me, by the Act and the Bill. It is to the last degree Astonishing to see, that perfect Ignorance, of the United States of America, which still prevails in old England. They willfully Shut their Eyes, that they may be Sure not to See. My Bowells of Compassion begin to be moved for this blind, debauched, devoted old Woman Britannia. Is there no possibility of reforming...
I am ashamed to acknowledge that I received your kind Letter, in due time, and have not answered it before: My apology is that I was on the Point of Setting out for Brest when I received it and have been travelling ever since. I am much obliged to you for the Letter and very happy to find that one Gentleman is to be found in France whose sentiments will give some Countenance to my own. I have...
I have only time at present, to beg the favour of you, to procure the inclosed, to be inserted in all the English newspapers. There is not a Circumstance exagerated, and the half is not told. RC with enclosure ( Adams Papers ); notation on back of enclosure: “printed in the English Papers.” For the possibility that JA wrote two letters to Jenings on 19 April, see Jenings’ letter of 24 April ,...
Yours of 31. Jan. is arrived. A Courier is arrived from Petersburg, who carried the Notice of Sir Yorkes leaving the Hague. All’s well in the north. The Courtiers in England, who indeed compose the nation, flatter themselves they shall raise the Devil in Holland. They may raise a Spirit but it will be a good one. The Symptems are very Strong. If popular Rage gets loose it will not dewitt, John...
I am very much obliged to you for your excellent Letter of the 14 of this Month. As The British Administration have made it their Business for 8 or 10 Years, to propagate in the Nation false News from America, and conceal the true, it is not Surprising that People are in Ignorance: But they must think seriously and inform themselves truly, now, or they will be the Loosers. I regret the Delays...
This Moment I received yours of the 16 as it is dated, but I suppose was the 10. You cannot imagine how much I am obliged to you for this Letter and the other of the second, and the Parliamentary Remembrancer. I have read the 12 Letters and am charmed with their Spirit—hope the Author will continue, for his Abilities and Temper must be of great service to our Country. Ld. N. is probably, at...
If you think that any thing I sent you lately is improper for publication, I hope you will stop it, or alter and correct it, by your own discretion, or delay it, till you think the time, proper. A vessell has arrived at Bilbao, from Newbury Port, by which I wrote to Congress and to my friends from Corunna, she brings news that two Vessells which lay at Bilbao when I was there, have also...
I have received your Favour of the 11. The Inclosures I have packed with my Dispatches, and the Duplicate of Mr. Amorys, to go by the first opportunity. Sir Joseph will kick, and cuff and pinch this People untill he forces into them a little Spunk. They cry shame upon his last Memorial more than the former. However I believe he knows enough of the nature of them, to answer his End, which I...
I have recd, your Letter with other Slips for which I thank you and another Since. I take constantly the Morning Post, Morning Chronicle London Courant and have taken the Evening Post, but Shall change it Soon for the General Advertiser. The Couriers de L’Europe and du Bas Rhin, the French Gazettes of Hague Leyden and Amsterdam and all the Dutch Gazettes. Is this to be a News Monger? I take em...
I am much obliged to you for your Favour of 21. and its Inclosures. I do not think myself at Liberty to write my private Sentiments about the Regulations of Trade between G. Britain and America, without consulting my Colleagues.— The British should have a Minister here to treat with Us upon this Matter.— all I can Say is that no commercial Regulations which Parliament can make will materially...
Last night I recd yours of March 31. inclosing a Receipt from some American Prisoners for Money advanced them. Let me beg of you sir to Point out, in what Way, I may remit this Money. I am ready to pay a Bill upon Sight, or to purchase a Bill here and transmit it, whichever is most agreable. The new British Ministry will only, plunge their Country into deeper Misfortunes if they Spend time to...
I have never answered your favor of August 22d. As to the Letters inclosed, I can say nothing. I cannot advise your Friend to take much Trouble about the Affair, because I think Congress will not be able to attend much to such things until the War is over. It is wholly out of my department, and I can do nothing in it, unless it be to inclose these or any other proposals to my Constituents. I...
Just a Line, by our venerable Friend, President Laurens, with whom your Communions will be sweet. Pray let me know if Mr Jay is coming to Paris, or come. The last Victory of Rodney, to whom Heaven grants them to shew that it dispizes them, has restored the national Delirium, in all its Effervescence. We shall have no Peace I suppose, in Consequence. War then! War? Yet I sigh for Peace as much,...
Last night I received your favour of 28 Novr.—and shall take the proper Care of the Papers enclosed. I must beg your Pardon for not having regularly answered your Correspondence, lately as I ought, but I have had too little Health, and too many other affaires, to be punctual to pay my debts to my friends. I thank you, Sir, for your Humanity, Patriotism and Friendship in advancing 100£ for the...
Your Favour with the Anecdote and that with the Preliminaries, I have recd. Be So good as to Send me every Thing of this Sort, which I will not fail to make a good Use of. The Imprudence of Ld shelburne in keeping open the question of American Independence, appears, every day more glaring to me and I find it is Seen in the Same light generally in Europe. The Kings Mulish Stubbornness, may cost...
Will you be so good as to inclose the inclosed to your Friend B and tell him that your humble servant is not the ill natured Mortal that Anonimous Gentry represent him. Pray what is the News about Peace? You know I presume the whole History of it. I know nothing. Is Mr Jay arrived at Paris? Is, the U. S. of America a belligerent Power? Where is the combined Fleet? Is Gibraltar to be relieved?...
I thank you, for yours of 30 Nov. I return the two Letters from Mr. L. I had the Honour of one, from him, by each of those opportunities, nearly to the Same Purpose. Your kind concern for our Health is very obliging. I shall cover me with Flannels and Furs, like a Dutchman. A Mans Feelings, Soon remove all the Ridicule of it. The “Pensees” will Serve to excite a Curiosity after the Memorial....
I was favoured, in due time with yours of 17. Septr, but have not been able to acknowledge it, till now. The late Transaction you allude to is this, a new Commission for Peace. J. Adams, B. Franklin, H. Laurens, J. Jay, and T. Jefferson are the Ministers. I dont See that this is any Tryal at all of Spirit and Fortitude,—it is more honourable than before and, much more easy. I assure you it has...
After spending the day very happily with a Number of our Countrymen in Commemoration of our glorious Anniversary, I cannot close the Evening more agreably than by conversing with You. I have three Letters of yours before me—10th—18th—29th—June. The Letter from Clinton was indeed as I am told by some Americans lately arrived, a mere Sport of Wit. I am told it was written by a General Howe, of...
The next morning after the Rect of your Letter, I went to Mr De Neufville and paid him the Eight Ducats as you desired, for which I inclose his Receipt. I want to know whether Mr Laurens is exchanged for General Burgoine whether he knows that he is in the Commission—of the Peace, or not, whether and when he intends to come over to the Continent. Pray invite him for me, I dare not do it myself...
Englishmen surely are possessed too much of the Spirit of Commerce, & are too perfect Masters of its maxims, to be informed that it goes all over the world, by land & Sea, in quest of proffit.— Every Cask of Rice or Indigo, of Tobacco or Flax-seed, of Wheat or Flour & every Cargo of naval Stores, which goes to Europe fm. America, will have written on it, “Detur digniori,” i:e: This Cask or...
I have received your Favour, written after your Return from Spa and am very glad you had so pleasant a Tour and found So agreable a Reception. I find that my Friend in Philadelphia, reprinted the Letters on the Spirit and Resources of Great Britain: after which they were again printed in Boston, and much admired. A Gentleman from Boston, tells me, he heard there, that they were written by one...
Yours of 25: is just come to hand. The Letters inclosed shall be sent, with mine. As to publishing the Letters in a Pamphlet, I have no Objection provided no Name is mentioned. But there is one Alteration necessary which runs throughout. They are now printed as if written by and Englishman. So that, England, Englishmen Britain Britons &c ought to be substituted instead of “We,” “Us,” &c. As...
Your favour of the 24, is just come to Hand. Your Congratulations on the publick acknowledgment of the United States do me great Honour. I received in its Time, your favour of 18. The Compliments you make me upon this occasion, are greater than I deserve, though they are not greater than were made me last Week, by one of the most respectable foreign Ministers at the Hague. “Vous avez, frappé,...
I am honoured with yours of the 14. You might well Smile at the Supposition that I know nothing about the Negotiations for Peace. I have no direct Information about it, Since the 2 of June, but I presume the Reason is, there is nothing to communicate. I am indirectly informed, that Greenville, after a long time recd a Commission to treat with all the belligerent Powers. But as our Ennemy dont...
I have to acknowledge the Receipt of three excellent Letters—one of the first, the other of the fifth and the third of the eighth of March. Thank You for the Copy of your Letter to the Pensioner and for your dialogue between York and Chatham. It is undoubtedly the Duty of every Commercial Nation, to make their Flag to be respected in all the Seas and by all the Nations, not by insulting and...
I am almost ashamed to acknowledge, after ten days, the receipt of your favor of the 18th, and to thank You for the pains You have taken in searching the Treaties for Examples of Subsidies. I had understood that the House of Austria, altho’ one of the most powerful in Europe, and the constant Rival of that of Bourbon, not being a maritime and commercial Power, had always occasion for Money, to...
Your’s of the 22d have just recieved. I wrote You a Line the 22d. Am happy to find that We agree so well in Opinion concerning the Equity of the Russian Negotiation. If that Court had gone farther, and endeavoured to abolish the whole doctrine of Contraband, excepting in Case of Siege, I should have thought it a beneficial Improvement in the Law of Nations. I can’t see, that because two...
I have recieved yours of the first. Will You be so good as to explain to me, what is meant by “Instructions to endeavour to inspire American Agents at Madrid, with Distrust and Jealousy of one another, at present employed in Europe?” What the armed Neutrality will come to, I know not. I believe it would have been much easier to have negotiated all the Maritime Powers of Europe into an...
Have just received yours of the 9th and I thank you. Waynes Agreement is thus explained. Gen. Arnold—Com. Jones, and many other officers of the American Army and Navy, have all along made it a maxim that the whiggish young Gentlemen ought to convert the Tory young Ladies. Accordingly the genteelest Part of the officers of Boston and Philadelphia used to keep up an Acquaintance with several...