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    • Adams, John
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    • Cooper, Samuel
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    • Revolutionary War
    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Cooper, Samuel" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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Yours of the 20th. was handed me by the last Post. I congratulate you upon the first modern Election, on the last Wednesday in May of Councellors as at the first. I could not avoid indulging myself Yesterday, in Imagination with my Friends in Boston, upon an Occasion So joyfull. I presume you must have had a very solemn and ceremonious Election, and wish that no Interruption may ever hereafter...
Yours of 27. May, received yesterday. I did not expect that our Army would have raised the Siege of Quebec, So soon, much less So unskillfully and So timorously. I cannot forbear, these Epithets. But raising a siege in open day, and in the Face of an Enemy, was a Step, that nothing could justify, that I can think of. The Small Pox is a terrible Enemy, but why could not this have been kept out...
Your obliging Favour of 17 June is now before me. It contains an elegant and masterly Narration of the late Expedition against the British Men of War, in Nantaskett Road, and its happy and glorious Event. I am a little mortified however that my good Friends and Neighbours the Militia of Braintree, Weymouth and Hingham, did not execute their Part with So much Activity, as they ought. But the...
Your last Letter relates to a Subject of the last Importance, to America. The Continental Currency, is the great Pillar, which Supports our Cause, and if that Suffers in its Credit, the Cause must Suffer: if that fails the Cause must fail. The Subjects of Coin and Commerce, are the most nice, and intricate of any within the compass of political Knowledge, and I am very apprehensive We Shall...
Mr. Hare, a Brother of Mr Robert Hare, the Porter Brewer in this City is bound to Boston. He has boarded, Sometime in the Same House with me, and is very desirous of seeing the Town of Boston. He is travelling to Boston merely from the Curiosity of a Traveller, and meddles not with Politicks. He has an Inclination to see the public Buildings, your Church and the Chappell particularly. I Should...
This Evening I was favoured with yours of 24 March, by Major Ward. I thank you, sir for your kind Attention to me, and for affording me an opportunity, of renewing a Correspondence which has been interrupted on my Part, by an incessant Application to Business, and by some little Diffidence in the Post, depend upon it, by no Diminution of Friendship or affection. Our Country sir, is in an high...
Your kind favour of July 1st. is before me, and I feel myself much obliged to you for it, as well as for your generous Endeavours, to console my dear Mrs. Adams under her anxiety. Our Ennemies discover the Meanness of their Souls in nothing more than in the low Lyes they make and propagate merely to distress, private Families. A very great Number, have been fabricated, Simply to afflict that...
Your Letter by the Marquis de la Fayette I have received and it contained So handsome a Testimony to the Merit of that gallant young Nobleman, as well as so many judicious observations on other subjects that I have ventured to permit it to be translated and published. The Complaint against the Family of Lee’s, is a very extraordinary Thing indeed. I am no Idolater of that Family or any other:...
This Moment I recieved your kind favor of this day’s date. Coll. Johonnot and my young Friend, Sammy Cooper, are well on Board. This young Gentleman, Sir, shall have the best Care taken of him, in my power, and the same with my own. Your kind Assurances that you will inform Me of what passes, give me great pleasure, and will be of great use to Me. I shall write You as often as possible. My...
I knew not when I undertook so readily to take the Care of your Grandson what I was about, little foreseeing a Journey of near four hundred Leagues by Land, in the Extremity of Winter, over the worst Roads and the vilest Accommodations and at the same time the most expensive of all Europe. I think myself very happy however to have at length reached Paris, without any essential Injury to the...