Thomas Jefferson Papers
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Thomas Jefferson to William C. C. Claiborne, 11 June 1810

To William C. C. Claiborne

Monticello June 11. 10.

Dear Sir

I had heard of your arrival in the Atlantic states some time since, and yesterday recieved your favor from N. Orleans of May 4. announcing your intended voyage, and that I should have the pleasure of seeing you at Monticello. this would at all times be highly welcome to me, but during this season will be peculiarly so, on account of the proceedings which are the subject of your letter. I have no doubt that some verbal communications between us will be useful to myself, & to our fellow citizens under your charge. for be assured that whatever personal gratification may result to the friends & advisers of the plaintiff1 from this persecution of me, it is not the principal aim of the plaintiff. his object is to fortify his claim by an indirect decision in favor of it by a judge on whose favor he counts. it is material therefore for the Orleanois that every thing material in fact, or in law, should be well understood. in the latter we are all ignorant, except so far as instructed by the counsel of that place who have written on the case. but there are some material questions not yet touched on by them: particularly the existing laws of Louisiana which would have authorised their former governors to remove E.L. at short hand as we have done, had this occurrence taken place in their time. this is wanting that we may not solely rely on the act of Congress of Mar. 1807. I should mention that I am obliged to go about the middle of July to a possession of mine in Bedford & shall be absent a month. I should be mortified were this to defeat me of the pleasure of seeing you here. I salute you with friendship & respect

Th: Jefferson

PoC (DLC); at foot of text: “Govr Claiborne”; endorsed by TJ.

The letter from n. orleans of may 4. was actually dated 4 June 1810. Claiborne confused TJ by misaddressing the letter as coming from that city rather than Washington, D.C. John Marshall was the judge on whose favor TJ thought that Edward Livingston (e.l.) counted.

1Preceding three words interlined.

Index Entries

  • An Act to prevent settlements being made on lands ceded to the United States until authorized by law (1807); and batture controversy search
  • Claiborne, William Charles Coles; consults with TJ on batture case search
  • Claiborne, William Charles Coles; letters to search
  • Claiborne, William Charles Coles; visits Monticello search
  • Louisiana (Spanish and French colony); laws governing search
  • Marshall, John; and batture controversy search
  • Monticello (TJ’s estate); Visitors to; Claiborne, William C. C. search
  • Poplar Forest (TJ’s Bedford Co. estate); TJ visits search