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You enquire, in your kind Letter of the 19th. Whether, “every Member of Congress did, on the 4th of July 1776, in fact cordially approve of the declaration of Independence”? They who were then Members all Signed it, and as I could not See their hearts, it would be hard for me to Say that they did not approve it: but as far as I could penetrate, the intricate internal foldings of their Souls, I...
Two of your Letters, viz No 24. Dup: & 25. Origl came to hand on the 16th: inst: These are the latest dates of any received from you, although the vessel that brought them had an uncommonly long passage from Gottenburg. We are happy to hear of your health and that of your family, as we have done more frequently than we could reasonably have expected. My Letters to you, thought not much behind...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr M c Coy & his thanks for the poem he was so kind as to send him some time past the reciept of which he has not been able sooner to acknolege. too old now to catch the glow of poetry, he is illy qualified to become a judge of it’s merits, other than that of sentiment. in this respect there is much to commend in mr M c Coy’s little poem. the...
A Table. Containing the Altitudes of Mountains calculated from Barometrical Observation, by A Partridge Captain in the US. Corps of Engineers. Names of the Ranges Names of the different Peaks Altitudes in feet. Remarks. above their Bases above the Sea. White Mountains Mount Washington . 4885.— 6634— The White Mountains are situated in the northeast part of the State of New Hampshire
I have duly received your favor of the 7 th inclosing Mess rs Shoemaker & Son’s conditional dft on G. & J. for 200$.— As we have heard nothing of their flour, have never transacted business for them at all, and know nothing of them, except of their bad manageme n t at your mill, we of course cannot become responsible even for this small amount, until we have something actually in hand.— As...
I have this moment received your’s of 3d. instt., an answer to which has been anticipated by my two last letters. I am urging the Captain of the Peacock, and still hope that he will be ready to sail the day after to morrow. I almost envy you the happy time which you will spend this summer in Orange, and which will not, I hope, be disturbed by any untoward change in our affairs. I think that,...
I have for many Months made it a rule, to enclose to you a Newspaper, every week, and I have intended that it never should be without at least one Letter, from myself or some one of the family, to you or my Mother—I believe this intention has never entirely failed; but it has not always been possible for me to write, myself—The reasons of this are so well known to you, that I hope they will...
Your very obliging letter of the 25. Ult , has been received and I cannot but be grateful for the friendly interest you take for the success of my proposed Publication, as also for the advice afforded me towards applying for Some Vacancy under Government. Previous to entering on any other subject I beg leave to Say, that I exceedingly regret, the evident changes in your health as mentioned in...
Four of your fellow Citizens overwhelmed by the calamities of the times, with large families totally destitute of the means of Subsistence, are incarcerated by the government of their Country for—debt. Attached to the Republican Administration of that government by every tie which can direct & controul the affections of man, they have thro’ a series of misfortunes & sacrifices supported &...
I addressd. your excellency a few days ago on the rumourd. defeat and Surrender of Genl. Hull’s Army. Since which we have recd. the detail and it appears that the British have got possession of the important post of Detroit in the usual way. Can any faith be held with a Nation So lost to every principle of honor, and So degenerated as to employ no other weapons but bribery, corruption , and...
Albemarle county to wit An Inquisition for the Commonwealth , indented & taken on the lands between the town of Milton & the Rivanna river , parcel of those formerly the property of Bennet Henderson deceased, and since held by his widow in right of dower and his sons John , James L. and Charles , in the parish of S
On the 24. May I had the very great satisfaction of receiving your kind letter of 23d. February. I felt doubly obligated to you for it as I conscious it must have been written under the impression, arising from the existing relations between the U. States and Britain, that the probabilities were very much against my ever receiving it; and I regret to say that the political appearances are not...
Letter not found. 12 April 1810. Acknowledged in Smith to JM, 15 May 1810 . Requests information about Lafayette’s Louisiana lands.
2226 ⅔ D Know all men by these presents that I, David Higginbotham of the county of Albemarle and state of Virginia , am held and firmly bound unto William Short of the city of Philadelphia and state of Pensylvania in the sum of two thousand two hundred and twenty six Dollars & two thirds of the weight and fineness of those of the present standard of the United States , to be paid to the sd...
You will be surprized at recieving a letter from me from this place—I did not contemplate being here & still less being in Europe as late as this— My very great anxiety to be again in America to attend to some of my affairs which required something to be immediately done, as the friend with whom I left my power to represent me at Philadelphia , M r Breck , had died without naming a substitute—...
I inclose you a Versification of the Speech of Logan , which I have just published. The knowledge that it had your approbation would be more gratifying to me than to have the applauses of “the million.” RC ( MHi ); dateline adjacent to signature; addressed: “Hon. Mr. Jefferson, Montpelier, Virg a ”; franked; postmarked New York, 20 July; endorsed by TJ as received 31 July 1814 and so recorded...
I have this morning received the enclosed from General Gaines. I had before requested of Mjr. Winder Judge Advocate that Genl. Ripley may be examined as early as possible that he may take the command which Genl. Smith will leave to repair to New York as a witness. Genl. Smith & Captn. Shipp have been ordered and Genl. Jackson is advised of the measure by a copy of the letter to Genl. Smith....
When I had the pleasure of seeing you this morning you desired to know how we had succeeded in procuring horses for the Rifle corps. The answer which I gave you was founded on the progress that was made previous to my having left the Camp last night, to aid in detaching 300 men for Com. Rogers; also to select the artificers of the navy yard to report to Com. Tingy. This occupied me ’till late...
Last week I sent you a number of the Monthly Theological Repository, containing some Speculations of Mr Van der Kemp and Mr Jefferson—With this Letter I enclose to my Father the numbers just published of the Edinburgh and Quarterly Reviews—Presuming that you know the History and Character of those Publications from Cobbett, you will sufficiently understand them to be in the Nature of Lawyer’s...
your Letter of the 2 Ins t was rec d in due course, & this answer defered So as to meet you at poplar Forest . your Reasoning has produced no change in my opinion, as to your Right to call for the last payment of the Land—nor can I forbeare Remarking that your Letter Seems not to have been written in that Temper of which you are so charracteristick. I assir’d you that Scott had Sued both you &...
18 November 1812. “I transmit … copies of a communication from Mr. Russell to the Secretary of State. It is connected with the correspondence accompanying my Message of the 12th instant, but had not at that date been received.” RC and enclosure, two copies ( DNA : RG 233, President’s Messages, 12A-D1; DNA : RG 46, President’s Messages, 12A-E2). First RC 1 p.; in the hand of Edward Coles,...
I feel very sensibly the honor which you do me in offering me the charge of the War-department & am still more flattered by the expressions of personal regard contained in your letter. A preference however for the situation which I now fill (among other reasons because it allows me to apply a portion of the year to the care of my private affairs) will make me decline that which you have...
When my Son departed for Russia, I enjoined upon him to write nothing to me, which he was not willing Should be published in French and English Newspapers. He has very Scrupulously observed the rule. I have been equally reserved in my letters to him: but the Principle on both Sides has been to me a cruel privation, for his correspondence when Absent, and his Conversation when present has been...
I have recd. your letter of the 13th. inst: with the two letters inclosed in it. Those would of themselves be sufficient vouchers for the distinguished qualities which had previously made you known here. I hope Sir you will find some alleviations of your separation from your own Country, in the hospitality of this, which is in the habit of shewing it to strangers, and especially to such whose...
As an additional apology for detaining the Frigate as well as for believing that an answer somewhat satisfactory is to be given to my note of the 10th. Novr. I ought perhaps to state to you more fully than I have done in my official letter what past at the diplomatic audience to which I there alluded. It was on the 1st. of Decr. the anniversary of the Coronation. The court was uncommonly...
I Received yours of the 9 th nov. in which was inclose d Three pounds on acc t of money advance d for nails for you also your directions to have the cellars Clean d out &c by Phill. but as he is to go away at Ch r istmast he will not have the Chance to do it as M r
To the Senate of the United States. The considerations which led to the nomination of a Minister Plenipotentiary to Russia, being strengthened by evidence since received of the earnest desire of the Emperor to establish a diplomatic intercourse between the two Countries, and of a disposition in his Councils favorable to the extension of a commerce mutually advantageous; as will be seen by the...
Your favor of Aug. 19. came duly to hand, and I tender my thanks for it. I have very little to add in return for your acceptable observations, especially as the opportunity, happens to be reduced to a very few minutes. Mr. Smith will send you the communications to Congs. with whatever else is important. The career of Mr. Jackson, has been equally short & singular. His correspondence as far as...
I have the honour to enclose the Petition of Leonard Blanchard, praying for a commission in the army of the U. States. I know not the man, personally, but cannot doubt of his merit when certified by so respectable authority as the Honorable Mr. Woods, Speaker of the House of Representatives of the State of NewYork, and, His Excellency, Governor Tompkins. I have the honour to be Sir, with great...
It is not known that the British govt. has accepted the mediation of Russia; nothing has been receved from our ministers employed under it; and no intimation to that effect has been communicated to this govt., either from the Emperor of Russia, or from the British govt. Early accounts, after the appointment & departure of our Envoys, indicated the rejection of that friendly overture, & altho...