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I thank you my dear Grandson for your very pretty Letter, as you cannot have any remembrance of your Grandparents. it is the more praiseworthy in you, to write to them, and then your hand writeing is so handsome, that it does you honour for your Age. The house which Your Father has taken in the Country, having a Garden full of fruit and vegetables, must be much pleasanter to you, and to your...
Your Letter of July 13th Should not have lain So long unanswerd but for the affliction of my Family. I could not write, my mind has been too much agitated, and distresst, by the Sickness and Death of my Dear and only daughter, Mrs Smith, whom you well knew. She came here, from the interiour of Nyork, where She has resided for the last Six years, in the Month of july, very Sick, as She had been...
“Oh that I too, could make a visit to my Father,” was your exclamation in your last Letter. more than a visit You may make, my dear Son, If the Newspapers may be credited, for they announce from South to North, that you are to be recall’d and to fill the department of State. this is repeated over and again, & appears to give universal satisfaction. this I learn from all quarters—I rejoice in...
I know not the date of your last Letter to me but this I know, that it is not so ancient, as the date of our Friendship, that commenced with our first knowledge of each other, “grew with our growth and strengthend with our strength.” it has continued undiminished through all the various vissisitudes of Life, which have checkerd our progress—from the juvenile days of Caliope and Diana, to the...
I Shall continue to write to you altho you may determine to leave St Petersburgh before my Letters can reach you. There may be family circumstances unknown to me at present, which may oblige you to a longer residence there than we at present Contemplate. Ladies are not always in a Situation to undertake a voyage of three, and four Months. do not make a calculation for less time, you may be...
I cannot let my Son pass through Plimouth without stoping to inquire after your Health, and that of Your Family! Nor of asking You who have lived many years, and where observations and experience, must have excited in your mind, Reflections which ought not to terminate with your days— what is your opinion of the great and important events which are taking place in the civilized world? will...
It is a very long time Since I have had the pleasure of hearing from you; but I have not been unmindfull of you or of yours. I have had much anxiety for the valuable Life of the Attorney General, and have now, many congratulations to offer you upon the prospect of his recovery. This is my first Subject, of congratulation— “Friends, Country first, and Then all Human Race” And what Nation, or...
I wrote to you on the 26 of August, and sent my Letter to N york to go in a dispatch vessel. I did not at the time know of the Humiliating and disgracefull Catastrophy which had befallen the city of Washington!! nor have I language to describe my feelings at the Torpor which blinded the Government to a sense of their danger, and their defenceless situation The Capitol is destroyed, but America...
I am much dispirited by the weather which prevented the intended visit of you and your Friends, I promised myself much pleasure in it and wished for a conversation with mr Lyman upon the News. I recollected his account of the Bourbons and the temper of the French Nation as it respected Napoleon, they found themselves humbled mortified deprest and saw no disposition in the Monarch raise them to...
Mr Adams call’d yesterday morning before six oclock, I rose before light in order to write to you, and waited only for the sun to give me light to do so; but the man came before, and I had only time while he waited to scratch of the hasty line I sent, or I should have told you, that the paper came safe the by mr d Greenleaf. Caroline’s Letter informs me that she was well the 7th. that John had...
I never know how to let a vessel go from Boston, without a Letter to Some of the Family. I have just written by the Mary, for Liverpool, but as a Gentleman calld yesterday to request Letters, I have given him one, for my Son, and one for mr Smith. this I have directed to be put in the Bag, as it incloses one from your Sister Hellen, which She Sent one for you— Mr Brooks has taken charge of the...
By mr. Tarbel, who left here the last of Nov’br I wrote to you, and to mrs Adams, introducing him to you, as the Grandson of our Ancient, and beloved Friend, dr. Tufts, who then enjoyed his faculties and was active in buisness—but upon the 8th of this month, closed a Life of virtuous usefullness. having finishd the works assignd him, he fell asleepe asleep—for his death was not preeceeded by...
Inclosed is a Letter which came under cover to the president. I take an early opportunity to forward it to you. I presume it is, from your son. At the same time I avail myself of the occasion, and write my sympathy, with that which I know you must feel, at the destination of our Children to a foreign Country. The appointment is no doubt an honorable one, and in a public light, I consider it,...
Feeling a little in the dumps, the why, or the wherefore I cannot tell, excepting a crick in my neck, & pain in my head, to cure all I take my pen to write you a few lines and inclose the , which Susan finished but has not had a conveyance for; so I send them by post and to make you laugh send you O an abominable wagish Letter I had almost said wicked, but then it made me laugh so, that I was...
This day compleats Eight weeks since you embarked for Russia. I would fain flatter myself that you have arrived at your destined port—the British Ship Squirel arrived at Halifax whilst mr Boylstone was there; who sailed for that place the Same day that you sailed for st petersburgh. the commander of that Ship informd him; that he had boarded the Horace upon the 21 of August, and that Mr Adams...
I received this day a Letter from your father dated 21 Sep’br. it was a Letter different from any which I have before received from him.—it communicated to me, and to you the sorrowfull intelligence of the Death of your dear and only Sister. She was taken Sick in August, and died the 15th of Seb’br with a nervous fever which brought on convulsions your parents are in great affliction as you...
How shall I address a Letter to you, how share and participate in your Grief without opening affresh the wound which time may in some measure have healed? distance excluded me from knowing Your distress, or shareing your Sorrows, at the time when you most needed consolation but neither time, or distance has banishd from my Bosom, that Sympathy which alltho, Billows rise; and oceans Roll...
I send you a Letter by mr Crufts this day received from Caroline. I had a few lines from her saying she was well, and longing to hear from us at Quincy. she had not then received my second Letter or Susans. I thank you for the papers & for the Nutmegs; I send by mrs Cruft the money for them. I hope for Letters by the J Adams and certainly shall have some, we must wait with patience for the...
God bless it— mr Jones was so obligeing as to come this morning to Quincy, to inform us that he was to Sail this week for st Petersburgh and that he should be happy to take Letters to you, that he proposes to pass the next winter there, This gentleman is the Son of mr J Th Jones Since he left Colledge he has been in France. he appears an intelligent well informed young Gentleman; he is not...
knowing what a punctilious young gentleman you are, I would not let your old Captain Bronson Sail again without a Letter to you by mr Charles Dexter You notice your Birth day, and Say you are twelve years old. I do assure you Sir it was celebrated here, not withstanding your absence as usual; with the ringing of Bells publick orations, military parade and social festivals, nor did we forget to...
I cannot refrain any longer from taking my pen and assureing mr van der kemp of the high gratification his visit to Quincy gave to his Ancient Friends there, the only regret attending it was, that it was so short, to his new acquaintance he communicated unexpected pleasure by the urbanity of his manners the politeness of his address by the exquisite tenderness & sensibility of his Heart, so...
I must write you a few lines to day from a Night of Rest, I derive Strength, all lost again by a night of wakefullness—If I do not get to Sleep as soon as I go to Bed, and that is early; it is all lost for the night yet I suffer no pain, except some times in my head. no fever, no cough, yet I was loose my flesh. my complaint seems to be an universal relaxation of the Solids. If I had lived in...
My good Husband has call’d upon me for Some Letters, written to me by my Son, when he was last in Paris, in 1815 in which he gives me a particular account of the Family of Count de Tracy and of the circumstances which introduced him to their acquaintance. Beleiving that it will give you pleasure to become acquainted with this happy Domestic Circle, I readily embrace this opportunity of...
I attempted to write to you, by Captain Bronson in Jan’ry but my strength failed me, and I have been ever since, in so low, and debilitated a state of Health, as to despair of ever recovering strength again, but for the last ten days, I have gained some, and my physician, encourages me, that I shall be benefitted by the returning Spring. I have not had any disease, such as fever, cough, or...
I this day received a Letter from my son dated october 21 from constradt—we had heard three weeks before of your arrival there by a vessel which came in to Salem, I rejoice that you are once more released from old ocean, and that you were so near the place of your destination. your voyage has been long and tedious. I hope you will experience Friendship and hospitality altho in so frozen a...
I Sit down to write to my dear daughter, almost without a hope, or wish that She Should receive it at St. Petersburgh. for as Letters are usually, more than three Months reaching the place of their destination—I hope you will have Embarked for America, before that period. it admits however of a possibility, that you may not, and in that case, a Letter will be welcome which communicates to you,...
My good Husband has call’d upon me for Some Letters, written to me by my Son , when he was last in paris , in 1815 in which he gives me a particular account of the Family of Count de Tracy and of the circumstances which introduced him to their acquaintance. Beleiving that it will give you pleasure to become acquainted with this happy Domestic circle , I readily embrace this opportunity of...
Altho I sent Letters yesterday to go by our Ministers from N York, yet a new opportunity offering I readily embrace it. mr Tuckerman has kindly sent us word that he is permitted to go in a vessel from Norfolk to Gottenburgh, and will take any Letters we may have, as his Brother the Rev’d mr Tuckerman came in his behalf, and will wait untill I write you a few lines my Letter must be short. I...
Your Letter my dear mrs Smith of Sepbr 23d I received while Caroline de Wint & her Babe were with me. It gave us both great pleasure to learn that you were well. mr & mrs de wint & miss Catharine Smaltys left us on the 12th for N York yesterday I received a few lines from Caroline Saying they reachd Providence the day they left us, & intended taking the packet the next day—I wish to hear of...
Your neat, pretty letter, looking small, but containing much, reached me this day. I have a good mind to give you the journal of the day. Six o’clock. Rose, and, in imitation of his Britannic Majesty, kindled my own fire. Went to the stairs, as usual, to summon George and Charles. Returned to my chamber, dressed myself. No one stirred. Called a second time, with voice a little raised. Seven...
keep yourself quiet. caroline will come Shortly, and then be sure you shall have a carrier after you, but I do not look for her, untill I learn that She is come to Nyork—I return your Letter and request that you would come up Say thursday or fryday and bring mr Hinkly with you to eat some Strawberries fresh from the vines. my best Love to Your good Mother and pray her to take a kind...
At last it is decided—it is as I conjectured in my last Letter to you, the Situation of Mrs Adams prevents their return to America this Season, and obliges mr Adams to decline his Appointment as Judge. I have received from him Several Letters of an old date Since I last wrote to you, but it was not untill yesterday that I received a Letter from my Grandson William Smith, of June 25th in which...
It was with great pleasure that I received and read your Letter of August 6th from Ealing, and it communicated to me a double portion of delight, as it appeard to be the emanation of a mind more at ease, than you experienced in that cold dark region of Russia—Altho the climate of G Britain is much more humid than that of America, and you can never as the proverb, says praise a fair day, untill...
I received your letter this day, written from Springfield; this has been a relief to us to hear that you were well, and that your dear mother bore her journey so well. After you left me I felt no restraint upon me, and could give way to all I felt and all I had suppressed; my harp was upon the willow, and my spirits at a very low ebb; I have in some measure recovered them, and follow you daily...
A ; I opend my Letters this morning and found a Number—dated last Novbr and December, the first which John Smith wrote on Board Ship, which in his second he refered to, one from mr A. which I inclose for you only. I am much obliged by the paper you sent containing an account of the Lord Mayor feast. I approve the Toast given by the American Minister. it was liberal patriotic, and concilitary...
It is better to go to the House of mourning than to the House of Feasting, or dancing, for the living lay it to heart. you my dear Children are now calld to the House of mourning and Sorrow, by the death of your dear Aunt Smith and the only daughter of your Grandparents, the only Sister of your Father. your Aunt died last night, to the deep affliction of the whole Family—her pure Spirit I...
It is more than a Month, Since a half finishd Letter has lain by, designd for you, and now it is like an old Almanac out of date, and lost its original value. I Shall therefore commit it to the flames, and begin a new Score. but Susan keeps you so constantly informd of all the events and transactions which transpire, and that in her own sprightly way, that She leaves me nothing to amuse you...
I realy ought to have written to you and have inclosed the few Lines to Cousin Abbe which were Sent me from Boston for her. now what excuse shall I make? why really I have not any. Yet I believe I will hunt up one. I remember that I could not agree with you in your politic’s you seem to have imbibed an undue prejudice against the chief Majistrate from the papers Stiled Federal. now I will tell...
I was never more at a loss what to Say to you than at the present moment. to accuse you of neglect, I cannot I will not, for I do not beleive it possible! Yet so unfortunate have I been, that not a line has reachd me from you, of a later date than the 1st of May. Two packets have since been received, containing Letters for your Father, your Brother, and for your Sons, but not a solitary Line...
This Letter will derive some merit from its being the latest date, and I hope will reach you soon. it comes to inform you that mr Tarbel has Letters for you—your Father has given you his opinion respecting the publication of the extract of his Letter to dr price by mr Morgan. I send you the copy from the original and am ready to ask mr Morgan, in the words of the play. “who was the dupe? with...
I should not so long have delayd to thank you for the freedom of your communications made to me in your Letter of Sep’br which were was an agreable proof of your Friendship, and a testimony that you considerd me what I really am your interested Friend, interested in all that communicates pleasure and happiness to the Bosom Friend & companion of him whose memory we cherish and whom we can never...
It is sometime since I have written to you and I feel that I owe you a Letter; you do not like our state movement any better than I do the long and and numerous Speeches of your wordy Fraternity. yet I like to read them, and when the character of the Gentleman is preserved, and due respect paid to constituted Authorities, I listen to the opposite Parties with pleasure, but I must say too many...
I mentiond to mr D. Greenleaf the money which was to have been Sent to the Young Cranchs for their use. he Said he had found a minut of it in mr Cranch’s Books and that he had written to Judge Cranch respecting it, and that he waited for his direction, respecting which he expected soon to receive— My Love to cousin Abbe. tell her the more She writes, the better She will love it—and that She...
I had got comfortably through the cold of the winter, but the chilling winds of March have laid me up in April. I was threatend with a Setled fever last week, which has reduced me in a few days quite low. the dr gives me hopes that he has broken it up with opium & calomil pills—and saline . I feel relieved both in my head and Limbs—and am now able to write, which I was not last week. I did...
I received this morning your Note of Sunday and Monday, and am the better for hearing of that your Family are Some of them so; I hope mrs Baileys emetic will not prove so trying to her, as mine was to me. tho only Simple Indian Root, I have Scarcly recoverd the Strength I lost. the very cold night of Sunday and yesterday tried my weak frame, and Shut up my pores so that yesterday I was very...
I received a few lines from you to night by mrs Adams; and rejoice in the returning health of your family. as you requested I wrote to you by wednesday post, & inclosed you J A Smiths Letter, and Several others, which I thought you would like to read,—but I find you had not got the Letter when you wrote—William wrote to me, that on the 17 March, (St Patricks day a dear pady) mrs Smith got to...
your Letter from St petersburgh of october 28th I received the last week, four Months after the date; it was quite as soon as I expected to hear considering the season of the year. I rejoiced to learn that you were safe from the dangers of the Sea, and had reached the City of your residence in health, after the fatigues, and dangers of so long a voyage. difficulties you will no doubt encounter...
Altho I have not the pleasure to acknowledg any Letter from you of a more recent date, than one by mr Forbes of Sep’ber last, which I only received a few days since, I will thank you for that, and am happy that I can congratulate you, upon a change in the aspect of our National affairs since that date, when they appeard to us in America; in not much less of a gloomy cast than to you in St...
you have e’er this, received intellegence most afflictive to the heart of an affectionate Child,. The Sudden Death of a Dear Parent. If the tender Sympathy of mourning Relatives, could assuage the Anguish of your own Bosom, how freely would it be administerd to yours, from the Bosom of your afflicted Aunt. I loved your Mother from Childhood, next to my own Children. in early Life, She and my...
For three weeks past there have been many & various reports in circulation respecting the Mediation to Russia & there has been much Said and written respecting the persons to be appointed. It was not untill yesterday that your Father & I was officially notified that mr Gallatin and Bayard were associated with you in a commission to Negotiate a Peace between Great Britain and the united States,...