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Th: Jefferson asks the favor of mr Smith to print for him 100. copies of the within letter each on a separate sheet of 4 to letter paper. he would be glad to have them by Thursday evening if practicable. he salutes him with esteem & respect. RC ( DLC : Henley Smith Papers); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by Smith. Not recorded in SJL . Samuel Harrison Smith (1772–1845) was born in...
THE friendship which has long subsisted between the President of the United States and myself gave me reason to expect, on my retirement from office, that I might often receive applications to interpose with him on behalf of persons desiring appointments. Such an abuse of his dispositions towards me would necessarily lead to the loss of them, and to the transforming me from the character of a...
We have at length got through the argument on the Cause for which I came here. It was finished yesterday after having taken up nearly four days—The opinion of the Court will probably be given in the course of the week, and my intention is to leave this place, to-morrow week, which will be the 13th:—I depend therefore upon the pleasure of seeing you again at latest in three weeks from this day....
I send you a march which I composed in your honor, I take the liberty to offer it to you as the tribute of a Stranger to your eminent talents and patriotism which brought you to the first seat of these united States. It is only a march, but in the scale of society, who pay his Share of talents and usefulness to the common good, has done his duty; as the head of this Enlightened Republic, I...
Yr. speech which reached here last night is so far as my information reaches much approved, for its modesty & generality & reserve of promises. A few think you might have well avoided that positive decleration about impartiality of the late admn. to foreign nations, as the public mind is divided on that question & the published state documents authorize a great deal to be said in contradiction...
Farewell my dear Sister & say good bye for me to my beloved friend Madison. He carries with him into the Presidency the most affectionate good wishes of my heart: produced by an intimate acquaintance with his public & private virtues for nine years past; & I can say with great truth that not one single act of his life during the period I speak of has excited a momentary doubt as to its...
I recieved last night your favor of the 3 d and am very sensible of the kind wishes of my friends at Fredericksbg that I should pass a day with them on my return home. at any other season I should have done this with great pleasure; but we have such terrible information of the impassable state of the roads that I dare not attempt it. the route I go is by cross roads altogether, not cut by...
Your liberality and goodness will pardon the liberty I take in addressing this note to you. Believing that if you can be satisfied of my reputation and real character as a moral and honest young man, and of my competency to fill the situation of a clerk in one of the departments, you will be kind enough to interest yourself in my favor, I beg leave to solicit your patronage, in procuring a...
I was favored with your’s accompanying the wool , on the 21 st ult ; and have delayed answering untill I could make my-self sufficiently acquainted with the subject and communicate such facts as would enable you to form some oppinion on it yourself— I find non of the wool you alude as sold so high in N York , has been employed by our hatters;— and M r Tybout says when wool is much disposed to...
I have yours of Feb. 20 and 23. The inclosed five sheets are the rough draught, which I have requested and you have promised to return. I shall burn it because I have made another Copy more correct in which I have left out the Name and much of the trumpery. In strictness, we have nothing to do with the question whether impressments of seamen are legal or illegal in England. Whatever Iniquity...
If I could dream as much Wit as you, I think I should wish to go to Sleep for the rest of my Life, retaining however one of Swifts Flappers to awake me once in 24 hours to dinner, for you know without a dinner one can neither dream nor Sleep. Your Dreams descend from Jove, according to Homer. Though I enjoy your Sleeping Wit and acknowledge your unequalled Ingenuity in your dreams, I cannot...
Your letter of the 21st arrived from Quincy this Morning and I can only assure you in answer that your Mother is much better and that Charles is very well. you may therefore spare yourself any farther anxiety and hope to meet us soon in perfect health I merely write a few lines to satisfy your doubts concerning them and to express my regret at your cause not having come on when you expected...
It is with extreme Satisfaction that I do my self the honour to address you as President of these United States; to see Merit, Virtue & Benevolence thus rewarded, my gratefull heart cannot help to rejoice at; your indulgence & friendly Offices have saved me from ruin & my Duty & Inclination prompts me to pray to God Almighty that your health be adequate to the arduous task Providence has...
Mr Troups complts to Mr Madison—incloses a paper to which the names of several respectable gentlemen are subscribed—Mr T feels himself obliged to state to Mr M that he has taken this liberty with Dr Kirkpatrick without his knowledge & without the knowledge of any other with one exception than those whose signatures appear on it. Our friend Doctor Kirkpatrick retires from Congress under...
Unwilling to depart from examples, of the most revered authority, I avail myself of the occasion now presented, to express the profound impression made on me, by the call of my Country to the station, to the duties of which I am about to pledge myself, by the most solemn of sanctions. So distinguished a mark of confidence, proceeding from the deliberate and tranquil suffrage of a free and...
4 March 1809, New Boston, New Hampshire. Has invented a system of medicine that will cure soldiers and sailors “of all camp sicknesses” and seeks a government subsidy to manufacture and bottle his medicines. “I hope if I have done no other good by writing this letter it will be pleasing to your phylanthropick mind to be informed of the thriving of us[e]ful arts in our land so as to prevent the...
4 March 1809, Newark. Congratulates JM on becoming president and anticipates “the same moderate, prudent, & pacific course” as that pursued by Jefferson. Expresses regret that the times are “fraught with great peril” brought on by “the folly and arrogance of one belligerent, & the commercial cupidity of the other.” If the choice comes to “honorable war or tame submission, we hesitate not, to...
4 March 1809. With Dr. John Thomas presiding and Cornelius Comegys serving as secretary the citizens offer JM congratulations upon his taking “the presidential chair” and hail the continuance of republicanism as it was practiced under President Jefferson. “Although a wise and just policy has thus preserved us from the political vortex of Europe,” the war now waging there constitutes a threat...
Document not found. 4 March 1809, Lancaster, Kentucky. Acknowledged in JM to the chairman of the meeting, 29 Apr. 1809 . A set of resolutions lauding JM on his inauguration and expressing a willingness to support the administration against foes at home and abroad.
As you now retire from the great theatre of political action, after having spent a number of years in the immediate service of your country—Permit us to hail your retreat from the important office you so lately filled with honor and dignity—to the calm retreats of domestic life. With hearts abounding with gratitude to you as an instrument in the hand of divine Providence, in promoting the...
On the morning of Mr Madison ’s inauguration, he asked Mr Jefferson to ride in his carriage with him to the Capitol , but this he declined, & in answer to a friend one who enquired of him why he had not accompanied his friend—he smiled & replied, “I wished not to divide with him the honors of the day—it pleased me better to see them all bestowed on him.” A large procession of citizens, some in...
The Citizens of Washington cannot forego the last opportunity, which may, perhaps ever occur, to bid you a respectful and affectionate farewell. As members of the great and flourishing nation, over which you have so illustriously presided, your virtues, talents, and services command their esteem, admiration and gratitude. Embarked in the fate of this solitary republic of the world, they have...
I recieve with peculiar gratification the affectionate address of the citizens of Washington , and in the patriotic sentiments it expresses, I see the true character of the National Metropolis . the station which we occupy among the nations of the earth is honourable, but awful. trusted with the destinies of this solitary republic of the world, the only monument of human rights, & the sole...