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In the middle of a Letter to Petersbourg this Morning Mrs Adams came in and invited me to take a ride, in the beautiful Sleighing We have at this moment, to last perhaps two days like two Such Opportunities as We have had before this Winter and then be melted away; We took the Post office in our Course, and there I found your beautiful Letter of the 4th of this month, on my return I continued...
I have read, my dear Sir, with great pleasure your elegant Eulogium, in your favour of the 27th of January on the Lectures and Character of our Minister in Russia. The Reviewers in our Boston Anthology and in the Portfolio of Philadelphia, wanting your Partiality in favour of the Man and his political Principles, have been more avaricious of their Praise, and more liberal in minute Criticisms....
Though your Letters give me great Pleasure, I Should regret the Receipt even of your favour of the 8th of this month if I could think it had diverted your Attention a moment from the Duties of your office or even from the practice and profits of your Profession. Your Office, is one of the most necessary and important in Society. A public Accuser is the Guardian of the Morals as well as...
I have received your kind Letter of the 18th of this month with your Oration on the 4th. Your Oration was first read to me, by the oldest Colonel in the continental Army now living; who has commanded Wilkinson and Brooks, whose blood flowed in the revolutionary War, and whose crippled Limb tho not lost may be compared to Uncle Toby’s. The Veteran exclaimed “This young Gentleman, makes my old...
In what terms can I address you? There are none that can express my Sympathy with you and your Family, or my own personal Feelings on this loss of your excellent Father. There is not another Person, out of my own Family, who can die, in whom my personal Happiness can be so deeply affected. The World would pronounce me extravagant and no Man would apologize for me if I should Say that in the...
Your kind Letter of the 6th has interested me more than any one I have received Since my last from your Father both by the important information, in it and especially by exciting the tender recollection of that great and good Man, and reviving all my Sensibility of his loss. I miss him every day and almost every hour. It is even a consolation to me that I cannot miss him long. But I must...
Your favour of June 29th has given me feelings, like those I always enjoyed when writing to your Father The distinction between a War and a peace party, is a Sophism. There is a Sense in which all Parties and all Men, wish for peace, except perhaps a few military Geniuses, who like Luxembourg have an aversion to planting Cabbages. It is a doubt whether there ever was a popular War. Some of the...
Thanks for your favour of the 2d. The “Portion of time that you can command every day” affords me very pleasing hopes. Reading Machiavel, is like conversing with a professed Actor on the Theatre: you can never know when he is in Jest, or when in earnest: whether he lies or Says the Truth. In his Art of War he inculcates a different doctrine, from that which you quote: namely that Princes, and...
“When I had an army to create, I would have called for the list of Revolutionary officers and would have nominated every Survivor according to the rank he held at the conclusion of the war—Yates, Schuyler, Lincoln, Knox, Clintons, Pinckneys, Sumters, Muhlenbergs; who you will. But not one of my Ministers, not one Senator, not one Representative, and what was more than all, Washington who was...
You must live to be 77 years and 9 months old, before you can know how much I am obliged to you for your favour of the 5th. Pray tell me Something of the Biography of Mr St. George Tucker of Virginia. I cannot Speak of the political morsell of his, without extravagance. I know not which to admire most, its Simplicity, its Beauty its Pathos, its Philosophy, its Morality, its Religion, or its...
If G. B. did not mean to acceed to the Russian mediation G. B. has acted the part of a Jocky, or a Gypsy, or a Jilt: for She must have received the proposition from the Russian Ambassador long before, our President received it from Mr Dashkoff, and She ought to have made her refusal known, instead of giving Passports to Mr Gallatin and Mr Bayard. I am not apprehensive of a disgraceful peace,...
I know not, whether Perry’s Victory is not the greatest Action in naval History. His Age, the horrible Slaughter, and total Disability of his own Ship, his presence of mind, his cool and prompt transition to another Vessel, his masterly and daring Attack on the Center of the Enemies Line, his Modesty, his humanity are traits of a great Commander, who God willing, will wear well. The...
Hendrick William Gordon Esquire I understand has been recommended to be Collector of direct taxes for the County of Middlesex. My acquaintance with this gentleman, commenced with the departure of my Son for St. Petersburg. He has been invariably obliging to me and my family in transmitting our letters and all intelligence to and from that mission. These personal and family obligations alone...
My most reverend Dearling presents her compliments. She highly applauds and greatly admires a complaisant Husband. Quare! Entre nous, can you divine whether this is more a civillity to you, or a Satyrick touch at me? For my part I See nothing very wonderful, that a Lady of whose fascinating attractions I have had Such ample information from the very best authority, Should take her Lover away,...
You have most unexpectedly procured for me a very high gratification, by making me acquainted with so many anecdotes of one of the most sentimental and accomplished families our Country can boast. I feel myself more nearly attached to Judge Tucker since I learned that he had his legal education under my friend Mr Wythe one of the most learned and amiable men I have known. I have read the...
I have nothing to Say at present to that enchanting Lady who So easily drew my Correspondent from his Letter: but that if I Should ever See her, I Shall not be contented with the Vandallik Custom So fashionable in these degenerate days, of Shaking Hands, but Shall claim the Priviledge granted by the civilized Ladies of France, 30 Years ago, to 70 Years. And I hereby Solemnly invite her to come...
A thousand thanks for your favour of 25 and 31. Ult. The Times are too serious to write. I expect De Troit and all Michigan, and all Perry’s Fleet will go. I know not whait is to prevent Washington City, The Treasury Office, the Presidents Pallace and the proud Capitol, from becoming The Head Quarters of British Principles. Admiral Warren might have done it long ago. Prejudice, Partiality,...
If I may judge of others by myself, Mr Hay had no cause of Apprehension that he Should be tedious: for when I had read the first page I could not lay aside the book till I had read the last. I know not when I have Seen a discussion of any legal or political question pursued with So dispassionate a temper, or written with more perspicuity, Accuracy or luminous Arrangement. The Author is Master...
When I meet The beattified Spirit I Shall Say to him, with our mutual frankness, “Sir you ought to have added two Chapters to your last Work; one upon Possessions, and another upon Dreams.” In the first, You you should have examined all that has been written by the great Mr Mead, by the little Doctor Mead, and by the learned Hugh Farmer, about Dæmons, Dæmoniacs, and Dæmoniacal Possessions: and...
I perceive by your Letter of the 7th. that Mr Hay is married to a beautiful little girl, that I once Saw in Philadelphia, at her Fathers Apartments when She was not more than three or four years old. Before I proceed farther I must congratulate you on your transmigration. The Office of Att. Gen. must be more congenial, less confined and more liberal than that of Controuler. But your...
As I have been, in the course of my life, 200 or 300 times in an “Agony of Embarrassment” I understand very well what the expression means. Mr Dexter too is not ignorant of it. When in Senate without the smallest expectation, or suspicion, or hope, or wish, or thought, of such a thing, he heard, Samuel Dexter nominated as Secretary of War, he was in amazement, and after a pause exclaimed “I am...
While I am reading a Letter from you, I almost forget that I have lost my delightfull Corrispondent of forty Years—I thank you for information, upon many points. On the subject of J. Q. A, I cannot write, or Speak. My heart is too full. I see his Destiny. He is to be depressed and oppressed by an immense load of Jealousy, Envy, Malice and Revenge, as your Father and his Father have been before...
Your favour of the 20th has given me great pleasure; because it informs me that you are happy. Your Visit to Philadelphia must have been delightful; and the Company of your excellent Surviving Parent on your return, and her domestication with you, and the fair Enchantress must be more So. This family Intercourse cannot be less pleasing to your Mother. It will preserve her health and prolong...
I long to See the narrative of Dr Rush’s Life. I hope it will be printed. The Anecdote relative to me, in 1774, and the Toast ascribed to me, at Mifflins Supper, is so exactly like me at that time, that I dare take my Bible Oath, that it is literally true. My toast then was, as you Say and I believe, “Cash and Powder to the Yankees.” You ask me what would be my Toast now? I assure you, it...
I can write you little, but the history of my diseases and their Symptoms. Your kind favour of the 17th found me ill in my bed in which I have passed the greatest part of my time for fifteen days. Our cruel North, and North East Winds have given me a cold and fever So distressing that I could neither read write, Speak or think Stand go, Sit or lye. What must have become of me? What and where...
There is an height, beyond which the proudest Wave cannot ascend: there is a depth, at least a bottom, from which no Waters are left to rise or retire. There is a tide in the Affairs of Men. It is a trite observation of Historians, that there is in human Affairs, an ultimate point of depression, from whence, Things naturally but gradually rise and return to their Level. Our american Affairs...
There are two Men in this World, who shall know and Esteem each other, if I can bring them together. To this end permit me to introduce and recommend to you The Rev’d Mr Edward Everett Minister of the most respectable Congregation in Boston and one of the first litterary Characters, at an Age when others are signalised by nothing but a degree at Colledge— When Genius falls in love with Study...
After this Letter was written and erroneously inclosed I recd yours of 23d which is merry and instructive beyond all Example PHi : H. D. Gilpin Papers.
Your Letter of the 23 has given me as much gaiety as all the fine Weather of the month Mr Dallase’s Anecdotes, as you repeat them, have Sense and points, Characteristic of Personages on whom the fortunes of Mankind depend: and not only merit Attention at present, but will be remarked by posterity. It gives me great pleasure, that Mr Dallas Speaks kindly of John Quincy; who however, I hope has...
“Alexander a Republican”! Was not Napoleon a Republican? A Republican Signifies, “any thing, every Thing and nothing.” The Romans were Republicans. Obscuro loco natus” was a Plebeian, i.e. nothing. The Virginia Gentlemen are all Republicans pro moro romano. Not one of their Posterity is to be “obscuro loco natus.” Mr John Taylor lives in “ Hazelwood, ” Mr Madison lives in Montpelier , Mr...