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Th: Jefferson acknoleges the reciept from mr Richard Rush of the originals of his letters of Apr. 21. and 23. 1803. and of Jan. 16. 1811. to his father , and begs him to recieve his sincere thanks and to convey the same with his friendly respects to mrs Rush & the family for this mark of attention to his feelings. he knew they would be safe while kept with the family; and was satisfied...
In what terms can I address you? There are none that can express my Sympathy with you and your Family, or my own personal Feelings on this loss of your excellent Father. There is not another Person, out of my own Family, who can die, in whom my personal Happiness can be so deeply affected. The World would pronounce me extravagant and no Man would apologize for me if I should Say that in the...
Your favor of the 12 th came to hand yesterday and I thank you for the kind attention you are so good as to pay to it. the subject of my letters. my entire confidence in the family will render satisfactory to me your addressing any member of it you think proper on the subject of those letters. an occurrence since my letter to you has justified my anxiety to prevent their getting into...
There are two Men in this World, who shall know and Esteem each other, if I can bring them together. To this end permit me to introduce and recommend to you The Rev’d Mr Edward Everett Minister of the most respectable Congregation in Boston and one of the first litterary Characters, at an Age when others are signalised by nothing but a degree at Colledge— When Genius falls in love with Study...
The Convention with G. B. the original of which Mr. Brent will shew you, raises the question whether a call of Congs. before the 1st. Monday in Decr. be expedient. The shortness of the period of difference, and the season of the year it embraces, seem to render the measure of so little practical moment as to dissuade from the inconvenience & expence of it. As the question however involves...
On my return after an absence of 7. weeks, I find here your favor of Nov. 13. and have examined the file of D r Rushes letters to me, of which I send you the whole except two or three. these were merely medical on the subject of a visceral complaint which attacked me when I first went to live at Washington . the letters of advice which he wrote me as a friend & physician on that subject, I...
Your former kindness, and your known benevolence encourages me to again solicit your aid Mr Clark, to whom I gave a Letter of introduction to you, not long since, and for whom you once before interested yourself, is very desirious of engageing in some active employ more congenial to his feelings, than doing Duty on Board a ship in port. With the consent of Commodore Bainbridge, he last week...
I can write you little, but the history of my diseases and their Symptoms. Your kind favour of the 17th found me ill in my bed in which I have passed the greatest part of my time for fifteen days. Our cruel North, and North East Winds have given me a cold and fever So distressing that I could neither read write, Speak or think Stand go, Sit or lye. What must have become of me? What and where...
As I have been, in the course of my life, 200 or 300 times in an “Agony of Embarrassment” I understand very well what the expression means. Mr Dexter too is not ignorant of it. When in Senate without the smallest expectation, or suspicion, or hope, or wish, or thought, of such a thing, he heard, Samuel Dexter nominated as Secretary of War, he was in amazement, and after a pause exclaimed “I am...
After this Letter was written and erroneously inclosed I recd yours of 23d which is merry and instructive beyond all Example PHi : H. D. Gilpin Papers.
I return you the note of your conversation in the year with Miranda. It presents him in a favorable and interesting point of view, and it can scarcely be doubted that he possessed a mind of more than an ordinary stature, improved by diversified acquirements. I suspect however that his greatest talent lay in giving them a bold relief, by a colloquial eloquence. In the single conversation I had...
The Attorney Genl. will be so good as to give his attention to the inclosed case, and to receive the verbal explanations which the Bearer has to make. NjP : Papers of Richard Rush.
Your favor of the 29. Ult: with the remarks on Mr. Wirt’s letter came duly to hand. The latter were communicated to Mr. W. with an intimation, that if he had any further observations to make on the subject, they might go in the first instance to the Treasury Dept. It is more than probable that your view of the subject will be satisfactory. I inclose for your perusal a letter from Judge Tucker....
Your Letter of the 23 has given me as much gaiety as all the fine Weather of the month Mr Dallase’s Anecdotes, as you repeat them, have Sense and points, Characteristic of Personages on whom the fortunes of Mankind depend: and not only merit Attention at present, but will be remarked by posterity. It gives me great pleasure, that Mr Dallas Speaks kindly of John Quincy; who however, I hope has...
When I meet The beattified Spirit I Shall Say to him, with our mutual frankness, “Sir you ought to have added two Chapters to your last Work; one upon Possessions, and another upon Dreams.” In the first, You you should have examined all that has been written by the great Mr Mead, by the little Doctor Mead, and by the learned Hugh Farmer, about Dæmons, Dæmoniacs, and Dæmoniacal Possessions: and...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Rush and his thanks for the pamphlet he has been so kind as to send him . he takes it with him on a journey on which he is setting out, and has no doubt of finding it an amusing and instructive companion. he salutes mr Rush with great esteem & respect. PoC ( MHi ); on verso of reused address cover of Henry Dearborn to TJ, 26 Sept. 1815 ; dateline at...
My Grandson William Stuben Smith, having returnd from Russia, where he has resided with his uncle as Secretary of Legation to that Mission, and as I have been informd the President intended him, the offer of continuing in that Character, to the Embassy to England, which honour he has declined, the Sallery allowd being insufficient for the Support of a Family, which he now has. his Brother John...
I have nothing to Say at present to that enchanting Lady who So easily drew my Correspondent from his Letter: but that if I Should ever See her, I Shall not be contented with the Vandallik Custom So fashionable in these degenerate days, of Shaking Hands, but Shall claim the Priviledge granted by the civilized Ladies of France, 30 Years ago, to 70 Years. And I hereby Solemnly invite her to come...
I am informed thro’ confidential channels, that Joseph Bonaparte is arrived at N. Y. under an assumed name, that he considers it proper to report himself to this Govt--that he would set out from N. Y. on tomorrow (tuesday) accompanied by Commodore Lewis, for that purpose; and be in Washington on thursday or friday on his way to Montpelier, under cover always of an assumed name. The motive to...
While I acknowledge the receipt of your favour of Nov’br 11th, accept my thanks for the kind interest you have taken in favour of mr Clark. May I presume, still further upon your Friendship; by requesting you to introduce him to your Lady and Family, whom he had not had the pleasure of Seeing, when he calld upon you before. Mr Clark has received orders from the Secretary of the Navy, to repair...
Col: Lane informs me that Mr. Hassler has selected for the scite of an Observatory which will have relation to the survey of the Coasts, the square North of the Capitol, which includes the spot on which the House formerly Gen. Washington’s stood; and that Mr. H. considers it necessary that the entire square should be exclusively appropriated to the object. I can have no doubt of the intrinsic...
I have received your kind Letter of the 18th of this month with your Oration on the 4th. Your Oration was first read to me, by the oldest Colonel in the continental Army now living; who has commanded Wilkinson and Brooks, whose blood flowed in the revolutionary War, and whose crippled Limb tho not lost may be compared to Uncle Toby’s. The Veteran exclaimed “This young Gentleman, makes my old...
I have duly recieved your favor of June 27. and in that mine of Jan. 21 1812. I pray you to present my high respects to mrs Rush your mother, and my thanks for the trouble she has been so kind as to take in searching for the two letters specified in my former one , as well as to your brother . I have no doubt that those two letters were of the number of those which mrs Rush mentions to have...