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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Rush, Richard" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 61-70 of 83 sorted by recipient
Th: Jefferson acknoleges the reciept from mr Richard Rush of the originals of his letters of Apr. 21. and 23. 1803. and of Jan. 16. 1811. to his father , and begs him to recieve his sincere thanks and to convey the same with his friendly respects to mrs Rush & the family for this mark of attention to his feelings. he knew they would be safe while kept with the family; and was satisfied...
In what terms can I address you? There are none that can express my Sympathy with you and your Family, or my own personal Feelings on this loss of your excellent Father. There is not another Person, out of my own Family, who can die, in whom my personal Happiness can be so deeply affected. The World would pronounce me extravagant and no Man would apologize for me if I should Say that in the...
Your favor of the 12 th came to hand yesterday and I thank you for the kind attention you are so good as to pay to it. the subject of my letters. my entire confidence in the family will render satisfactory to me your addressing any member of it you think proper on the subject of those letters. an occurrence since my letter to you has justified my anxiety to prevent their getting into...
There are two Men in this World, who shall know and Esteem each other, if I can bring them together. To this end permit me to introduce and recommend to you The Rev’d Mr Edward Everett Minister of the most respectable Congregation in Boston and one of the first litterary Characters, at an Age when others are signalised by nothing but a degree at Colledge— When Genius falls in love with Study...
The Convention with G. B. the original of which Mr. Brent will shew you, raises the question whether a call of Congs. before the 1st. Monday in Decr. be expedient. The shortness of the period of difference, and the season of the year it embraces, seem to render the measure of so little practical moment as to dissuade from the inconvenience & expence of it. As the question however involves...
On my return after an absence of 7. weeks, I find here your favor of Nov. 13. and have examined the file of D r Rushes letters to me, of which I send you the whole except two or three. these were merely medical on the subject of a visceral complaint which attacked me when I first went to live at Washington . the letters of advice which he wrote me as a friend & physician on that subject, I...
Your former kindness, and your known benevolence encourages me to again solicit your aid Mr Clark, to whom I gave a Letter of introduction to you, not long since, and for whom you once before interested yourself, is very desirious of engageing in some active employ more congenial to his feelings, than doing Duty on Board a ship in port. With the consent of Commodore Bainbridge, he last week...
I can write you little, but the history of my diseases and their Symptoms. Your kind favour of the 17th found me ill in my bed in which I have passed the greatest part of my time for fifteen days. Our cruel North, and North East Winds have given me a cold and fever So distressing that I could neither read write, Speak or think Stand go, Sit or lye. What must have become of me? What and where...
As I have been, in the course of my life, 200 or 300 times in an “Agony of Embarrassment” I understand very well what the expression means. Mr Dexter too is not ignorant of it. When in Senate without the smallest expectation, or suspicion, or hope, or wish, or thought, of such a thing, he heard, Samuel Dexter nominated as Secretary of War, he was in amazement, and after a pause exclaimed “I am...
After this Letter was written and erroneously inclosed I recd yours of 23d which is merry and instructive beyond all Example PHi : H. D. Gilpin Papers.