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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Rush, Richard" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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The occasion which led to your favor of this morning merits all our congratulations, and I heartily join in those you have expressed. The terms of the peace will I hope be satisfactory to our Country. With the events of the war, they can not fail to command the respect of every other. … Be so good as to return the two papers after a leisurely perusal. The newspaper is the latest that has...
I might perhaps agee with Mr Grattan, that Mr Burke had read more of the Brittish Poets than even Dr Johnson, who wrote their Lives, that he understood them better and tasted them with better Judgment and correct discomment; & that he had read the Latin Poets and Orators: but I can go no farther. His uncommon Reading of History, the Law of Nature and Nations of Jurisprudence in General and of...
There is an height, beyond which the proudest Wave cannot ascend: there is a depth, at least a bottom, from which no Waters are left to rise or retire. There is a tide in the Affairs of Men. It is a trite observation of Historians, that there is in human Affairs, an ultimate point of depression, from whence, Things naturally but gradually rise and return to their Level. Our american Affairs...
My good Friend’s when they are going to make a visit to Washington, wish an introduction to the most Eminent public Characters there, and I embrace with pleasure the opportunity of bringing you acquainted with one of our best Divines. He is a gentleman of Liberal Sentiments, both in Religion and politicks—Knowing that he designed a journey to washington, the Electors, have committed to him,...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Rush , & his thanks for the copy of his oration of the 4 th of July, which he has been so kind as to send him, and for his the friendly wishes for he expresses for his health and happiness. to the last nothing contributes more than the contemplation of such specimens as mr Rush has sent him of the eloquence of his country devoted to the celebration...
Your favour of the 20th has given me great pleasure; because it informs me that you are happy. Your Visit to Philadelphia must have been delightful; and the Company of your excellent Surviving Parent on your return, and her domestication with you, and the fair Enchantress must be more So. This family Intercourse cannot be less pleasing to your Mother. It will preserve her health and prolong...
I thank you for the information transmitted me in your Last Letter. I have Sent an extract to my Son—I wish that Congress could be convinced, unawed by Constituents, that parsparsimony to their public officers, is neither wise, just, or prudent, that in the Eyes of foreign Nations, it is contemptible, as well as in those of our own Countrymen, who know our means, that we are become a great...
J Madison requests a Consultation with the Heads of Depts. tomorrow (tuesday) at one OClock, & that they remain to dinner. RC (offered for sale by The Raab Collection, Ardmore, Pa., Catalog 57 [2009], item 11, ID 7973). Docketed by Rush: “Cabinet meeting, Nov: 7. 1814, and remain to dine.” Year not indicated; conjectural year assigned based on the docket. A nearly identical note in JM ’s hand...
The Copy inclosed in your Letter has tenderly affected the little Sensibility that remains in me. As a Memorial of the Friendship of Dr Rush I esteem it prescious. Mark my Words; it is Party Faction and Fashion that give Characters; Truth and Justice, are Studiously omitted neglected and forgotten. Jefferson is no more my Friend Who dares to Independence to pretend Which I was born to...
I thank you for your favour of the 20th and the Extracts which are very consolatory. I have Sometimes thought that the People of the U.S. of both Parties were the worst Judges in the World, of themselves, their Resources, the Character of their own Nation and even of the Geography of their Country. Mr Madisons Administration, must be recorded by Historians; not with Standing all the Errors,...