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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Rush, Richard" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 31-60 of 83 sorted by date (descending)
The Convention with G. B. the original of which Mr. Brent will shew you, raises the question whether a call of Congs. before the 1st. Monday in Decr. be expedient. The shortness of the period of difference, and the season of the year it embraces, seem to render the measure of so little practical moment as to dissuade from the inconvenience & expence of it. As the question however involves...
I have recd. yours of the 2d inst. with the papers inclosed with it, and thank you for having so comprehensively provided for the objects of mine to which it is an answer I return the Proclamation which was properly varied from that of 1806, which had more in view than the one now in hand. To avoid questions or feelings of State Prerogative, I have pencilled for erasure the words specifying...
I transmit, to you two Letter lately received altho of an old date. they may communicate to you some facts which perhaps you might not receive from any other Source. I do it in confidence, as Some of the Sentiments are not calculated for the meridian where the writer now is. where in a Subsequent Letter of july 17th he writs that “one cannot indulge even a Sentiment of compassion for the...
I thank you for your favour of the 20th and the Extracts which are very consolatory. I have Sometimes thought that the People of the U.S. of both Parties were the worst Judges in the World, of themselves, their Resources, the Character of their own Nation and even of the Geography of their Country. Mr Madisons Administration, must be recorded by Historians; not with Standing all the Errors,...
I might perhaps agee with Mr Grattan, that Mr Burke had read more of the Brittish Poets than even Dr Johnson, who wrote their Lives, that he understood them better and tasted them with better Judgment and correct discomment; & that he had read the Latin Poets and Orators: but I can go no farther. His uncommon Reading of History, the Law of Nature and Nations of Jurisprudence in General and of...
I return the Ed: Review with my thanks for the opportunity of perusing the chapter on France, which has all the interest which you attach to it: notwithstanding the occurrences subsequent to its date. On casting an eye over the Chapter on corn laws, I was surprized to see so acute & learned a Critic puzzled in a case which appeared so plain & familiar. I have noted it in the margin of page...
The inclosed letter from Commodore Patterson inclosed to me by Mr. Homans, presents several points on which your advice to him may be useful, so far as the instructions already issued from one or other of the Departments be found inadequate. It seems entirely proper that naval protection of it can be spared, should be employed agst. the Carthaginian Corsairs, in pursuance of the rules lately...
“Watchman! What of the Night?” To what hour of the Evening are We advanced? How many hours remain before day break? Have you a repeating Watch that can Strike the hour and the quarter of an hour in the darkest hour of Sablest night? Rochefaucaut, Condorcet, Robespiere, Brissot, Danton, Orleans Buoneparte, Pitt, Fox, Burk, Alexander, Georges, Louis’s, Charleses, Francises Fredericks are but...
My Grandson William Stuben Smith, having returnd from Russia, where he has resided with his uncle as Secretary of Legation to that Mission, and as I have been informd the President intended him, the offer of continuing in that Character, to the Embassy to England, which honour he has declined, the Sallery allowd being insufficient for the Support of a Family, which he now has. his Brother John...
The first Thing that Struck me when I recd your favour of the 15th. was the Seal. I will not tell you, at present how many reflections this excited before I opened the Letter. I determined at once to answer it by my Seal. You will See it on the Outside of this. An Ellipsis Surrounded by 13 Starrs, protecting a Pine Tree, with a Codfish and a Buck. A very bright Starr at the Top of the Pine....
It does not Signify, to grow old. You never can get rid of worldly Affairs. I never was more distracted with Business. It pours in upon me from all quarters. I want to write you every day, and two or three times a day. I have read your speculations with pleasure, but with Some grains of reserve. I Send you a Richelieu, upon the Fisheries, Said to be from Connecticut. That State is a rich bed...
Your two Letters of the 27th Ult. have been recd. with the Enclosures, for all which I thank you. You ask “Some Reflections of my own.” My dear Sir! It would require a Folio Volume, to give you the Histories, Dissertations and discussions, which you require. How can I, sans Eyes, sans hands, sans Memory, sans Clerks, sans Secretaries, sans Aids du Camp; sans Amanuensis, undertake to write...
The Sight of a well known hand, made my heart leap, before I opened your Letter of the 6th. the Contents compleated my delight. May your health be as permanent as I believe your understanding to be Sound and your heart pure. The Pamphlet inclosed to me, ought to be Sent to every foreign Minister and Consul, tho’ it Should be under the Restrictions you prescribe to me I inclose to you Papers...
The occasion which led to your favor of this morning merits all our congratulations, and I heartily join in those you have expressed. The terms of the peace will I hope be satisfactory to our Country. With the events of the war, they can not fail to command the respect of every other. … Be so good as to return the two papers after a leisurely perusal. The newspaper is the latest that has...
Thanks for yours of Dec. 24. I Still entertain hopes that New England will not be forever alienated from the Southern and the middle States, and therefore take with pleasure, the Liberty of introducing Some of our most promising Young Gentlemen. Mr Gray is on his Travels and Mr George Ticknor. I believe I did not give the latter a Line to you. He has a most amiable Character. He is Said to...
I have much pleasure in introducing to you Francis C. Gray Esqr a Son of our late Lt. Governor. Educated to Letters improved by travel and regularly admitted to the Bar you will probably hear more of him and I hope have much to do with him hereafter, for the good of your Country. He can give you a better account of New England Politicks than I can. I have lately read Rassilas, Candide, Zadig,...
As my Husband has thought it proper to inclose a Letter, received from our Son to the president, which I presume you may read, I inclose one to me, for your perusal, the political part of which you may read to the president if you judge best; it is a more fre e expression of his feelings, and opinions, respecting the continuence of this farze of a negotiation on the part of the British...
“Alexander a Republican”! Was not Napoleon a Republican? A Republican Signifies, “any thing, every Thing and nothing.” The Romans were Republicans. Obscuro loco natus” was a Plebeian, i.e. nothing. The Virginia Gentlemen are all Republicans pro moro romano. Not one of their Posterity is to be “obscuro loco natus.” Mr John Taylor lives in “ Hazelwood, ” Mr Madison lives in Montpelier , Mr...
J Madison requests a Consultation with the Heads of Depts. tomorrow (tuesday) at one OClock, & that they remain to dinner. RC (offered for sale by The Raab Collection, Ardmore, Pa., Catalog 57 [2009], item 11, ID 7973). Docketed by Rush: “Cabinet meeting, Nov: 7. 1814, and remain to dine.” Year not indicated; conjectural year assigned based on the docket. A nearly identical note in JM ’s hand...
Your Letter of the 23 has given me as much gaiety as all the fine Weather of the month Mr Dallase’s Anecdotes, as you repeat them, have Sense and points, Characteristic of Personages on whom the fortunes of Mankind depend: and not only merit Attention at present, but will be remarked by posterity. It gives me great pleasure, that Mr Dallas Speaks kindly of John Quincy; who however, I hope has...
There are two Men in this World, who shall know and Esteem each other, if I can bring them together. To this end permit me to introduce and recommend to you The Rev’d Mr Edward Everett Minister of the most respectable Congregation in Boston and one of the first litterary Characters, at an Age when others are signalised by nothing but a degree at Colledge— When Genius falls in love with Study...
After this Letter was written and erroneously inclosed I recd yours of 23d which is merry and instructive beyond all Example PHi : H. D. Gilpin Papers.
There is an height, beyond which the proudest Wave cannot ascend: there is a depth, at least a bottom, from which no Waters are left to rise or retire. There is a tide in the Affairs of Men. It is a trite observation of Historians, that there is in human Affairs, an ultimate point of depression, from whence, Things naturally but gradually rise and return to their Level. Our american Affairs...
I can write you little, but the history of my diseases and their Symptoms. Your kind favour of the 17th found me ill in my bed in which I have passed the greatest part of my time for fifteen days. Our cruel North, and North East Winds have given me a cold and fever So distressing that I could neither read write, Speak or think Stand go, Sit or lye. What must have become of me? What and where...
I long to See the narrative of Dr Rush’s Life. I hope it will be printed. The Anecdote relative to me, in 1774, and the Toast ascribed to me, at Mifflins Supper, is so exactly like me at that time, that I dare take my Bible Oath, that it is literally true. My toast then was, as you Say and I believe, “Cash and Powder to the Yankees.” You ask me what would be my Toast now? I assure you, it...
Your favour of the 20th has given me great pleasure; because it informs me that you are happy. Your Visit to Philadelphia must have been delightful; and the Company of your excellent Surviving Parent on your return, and her domestication with you, and the fair Enchantress must be more So. This family Intercourse cannot be less pleasing to your Mother. It will preserve her health and prolong...
While I am reading a Letter from you, I almost forget that I have lost my delightfull Corrispondent of forty Years—I thank you for information, upon many points. On the subject of J. Q. A, I cannot write, or Speak. My heart is too full. I see his Destiny. He is to be depressed and oppressed by an immense load of Jealousy, Envy, Malice and Revenge, as your Father and his Father have been before...
As I have been, in the course of my life, 200 or 300 times in an “Agony of Embarrassment” I understand very well what the expression means. Mr Dexter too is not ignorant of it. When in Senate without the smallest expectation, or suspicion, or hope, or wish, or thought, of such a thing, he heard, Samuel Dexter nominated as Secretary of War, he was in amazement, and after a pause exclaimed “I am...
I perceive by your Letter of the 7th. that Mr Hay is married to a beautiful little girl, that I once Saw in Philadelphia, at her Fathers Apartments when She was not more than three or four years old. Before I proceed farther I must congratulate you on your transmigration. The Office of Att. Gen. must be more congenial, less confined and more liberal than that of Controuler. But your...
When I meet The beattified Spirit I Shall Say to him, with our mutual frankness, “Sir you ought to have added two Chapters to your last Work; one upon Possessions, and another upon Dreams.” In the first, You you should have examined all that has been written by the great Mr Mead, by the little Doctor Mead, and by the learned Hugh Farmer, about Dæmons, Dæmoniacs, and Dæmoniacal Possessions: and...