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Montezillo, in the Spanish language signifies “a little hill.” You will search for it in vain in Italy; none of the Alps, the Appenines, no, nor the Pyranees, nor Asturians, ever bore that name. the City, Village or Villa, ever arrived to that honour. Search, and research. find it if you can. Neither Montezillo, nor Monticello desire many of your thoughts; but the Italian Republicks, like the...
Your Letter of the 29th of September has not been answered by me as it ought to have been. Your Excursion Horseback gave me high hopes; and excited vain Recollections. Dean Swift bragged; and why Should not I.? Swift crowed over Pope Arbuthnot &c and boasted that he could ride 500 miles upon a trotting Horse. In 1777 I rode on Horseback from Penn’s Hill in this Town to Baltimore, more than 500...
J. Madison requests a consultation with The Heads of Depts. to day at 1 OC DLC : Papers of Richard Rush.
On my return after an absence of 7. weeks, I find here your favor of Nov. 13. and have examined the file of D r Rushes letters to me, of which I send you the whole except two or three. these were merely medical on the subject of a visceral complaint which attacked me when I first went to live at Washington . the letters of advice which he wrote me as a friend & physician on that subject, I...
My good Friend’s when they are going to make a visit to Washington, wish an introduction to the most Eminent public Characters there, and I embrace with pleasure the opportunity of bringing you acquainted with one of our best Divines. He is a gentleman of Liberal Sentiments, both in Religion and politicks—Knowing that he designed a journey to washington, the Electors, have committed to him,...
I have received your favour of the 18th: and thank you has your “Idea”; Your reasoning upon it is that of a modest prudent philosopher & Statesman. It is more; It is classical enough for a member of the Academy of inscription and Belle letters. I who am neither Philosopher Statesman or Academician, would if I had power cause medals to be struck of every conflagration, Massacre, prison stripe,...
While I acknowledge the receipt of your favour of Nov’br 11th, accept my thanks for the kind interest you have taken in favour of mr Clark. May I presume, still further upon your Friendship; by requesting you to introduce him to your Lady and Family, whom he had not had the pleasure of Seeing, when he calld upon you before. Mr Clark has received orders from the Secretary of the Navy, to repair...
I Shall certainly comply with your Wishes, expressed in your favour of 31st Octr. The Correspondence between your Father and me has been for forty years together too intimate and too free, to See the Light at present. I have Letters from Dr Rush that would demonstrate his Patriotism, his Virtue, his Piety his Genius his Learning his Benevolenc his Generosity his Charity and at the Same time...
Your former kindness, and your known benevolence encourages me to again solicit your aid Mr Clark, to whom I gave a Letter of introduction to you, not long since, and for whom you once before interested yourself, is very desirious of engageing in some active employ more congenial to his feelings, than doing Duty on Board a ship in port. With the consent of Commodore Bainbridge, he last week...
You will observe in one of the inclosed letters several legal points stated by Commodore Patterson relating a distribution of property taken in the Fort on Apalachecola. Will you be so good as to examine them, and communicate the result? The report of the Land Commander has not yet come to hand but will probably not be delayed. It may throw light on some of the facts. In consequence of your...
I have recd. a Letter from Dr Maese, requesting of me, Letters of your Father for Publication. I have collected a few, ancienct and modern: But if you consider that I have recd Letters from him in Philadelphia, New York, Braintree, Quincy, France Holland and England; You must percieve the difficulty of Searching Old Trunks for a Chain of Correspondence for forty years I have already found...
I take the Liberty of introducing to you and your good Lady, Leiut Clark, who is on his way to visit his Friends in Maryland. he can give you any information you may wish for, respecting your Friends in Quincy. you will recollect mr Clark is the Gentleman, of whom I asked of you, when he was a Stranger Some information respecting, his Character, and connections— I have not had any cause Since...
The Copy inclosed in your Letter has tenderly affected the little Sensibility that remains in me. As a Memorial of the Friendship of Dr Rush I esteem it prescious. Mark my Words; it is Party Faction and Fashion that give Characters; Truth and Justice, are Studiously omitted neglected and forgotten. Jefferson is no more my Friend Who dares to Independence to pretend Which I was born to...
As I have taken the liberty of throwing on your attention the business of fixing on a site for an Observatory at Washington, I pass the inclosed to Mr. Dallas thro’ your hands. You will see that the turn which the subject is likely to take, will relieve you from further trouble with respect to it. I have recd. your favor of . We regret that we shall not have the pleasure of seeing you, and we...
Col: Lane informs me that Mr. Hassler has selected for the scite of an Observatory which will have relation to the survey of the Coasts, the square North of the Capitol, which includes the spot on which the House formerly Gen. Washington’s stood; and that Mr. H. considers it necessary that the entire square should be exclusively appropriated to the object. I can have no doubt of the intrinsic...
Your favor of the 29. Ult: with the remarks on Mr. Wirt’s letter came duly to hand. The latter were communicated to Mr. W. with an intimation, that if he had any further observations to make on the subject, they might go in the first instance to the Treasury Dept. It is more than probable that your view of the subject will be satisfactory. I inclose for your perusal a letter from Judge Tucker....
I know not whether I am in your debt, or you in mine, but I can no longer refrain from writing The death of mr Dexter has awakened my most latent feelings; I am personally so deeply interested in this event, that I dare not trust myself to write, or even think, on the importance of it. Poor, short sighted mortals as we are! I consider my own reputation, & the true character of my...
J. Madison requests a consultation with the heads of Departments to day at 12 o’clock NjP : Papers of Richard Rush.
I have not yet replied to your kind letter from Philadelphia—I designed it Sooner, but overwhelmd as we have been, by the unexpected Stroke of providence, in the premature (as to us weak Mortals) it appears, in the death of the Greatest Man our State could boast, and one of the best, what could I say? but be dumb and silent, for thou O Lord hast done it.—A Nations Tears flow upon this...
I thank you for the information transmitted me in your Last Letter. I have Sent an extract to my Son—I wish that Congress could be convinced, unawed by Constituents, that parsparsimony to their public officers, is neither wise, just, or prudent, that in the Eyes of foreign Nations, it is contemptible, as well as in those of our own Countrymen, who know our means, that we are become a great...
The President, Requests the honor of Mr. Rush’s Company at dinner Tuesday the 19h. inst. at 5 o’clock The favor of an Answer is desired DLC : Papers of Richard Rush.
It is a long time since we have received a Line from you at Quincy. I have been so very sick myself, as not to be able to write for several weeks; I am still confined to my chamber very feeble. during this period, I have been, more than once informed that you had been Named for a mission to Russia. While on the one hand, it would give me pleasure to learn that my son was succeeded by so...
The Attorney Genl. will be so good as to give his attention to the inclosed case, and to receive the verbal explanations which the Bearer has to make. NjP : Papers of Richard Rush.
To your studies in Jurisprudence, I wish all the success, which you can possibly wish for yourself; but you must collect yourself & remember that Intemperance in the pursuit of knowledge, is not less dangerous than in that of pleasure. Your favour of the third has afforded me much amusement, though a dozen years ago & more I was convinced that mr Cooper was a man of talents and Science; yet at...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Rush and his thanks for the pamphlet he has been so kind as to send him . he takes it with him on a journey on which he is setting out, and has no doubt of finding it an amusing and instructive companion. he salutes mr Rush with great esteem & respect. PoC ( MHi ); on verso of reused address cover of Henry Dearborn to TJ, 26 Sept. 1815 ; dateline at...
Thanks for your favour of the 2nd. & the valuable pamphlet “America Jurisprudence” With no less pleasure than difficulty I have read it once; the difficulty arose from a distressing inflammation in my eyes. Before I venture to say another word, concerning this book, I must promise, that I am no judge of its merits, because for the last forty years, I have been a stranger to Lawyers, Judges &...
Not being possessed of the answer from the War Dept. referred to in the inclosed, I can not compare the grounds of it, with the opinions to which it has given rise. It would seem however that the Soldiers in question must be entitled to such a discharge as will seem to them all the recommence stipulated for serving during the war. Will you be so good as to take a legal view of the subject, and...
I can not do better with the inclosed communication than to put it into your hands, with a request that you will give effect to the ideas of Mr. Dallas if you concur in them, by a few lines to Mr. Dick, who appears to be well disposed to sustain the interests of the U. S. I see by the newspapers that J. B. had passed thro’ Baltimore for Washington. I have recd yours acknowleging the rect. of...
I am informed thro’ confidential channels, that Joseph Bonaparte is arrived at N. Y. under an assumed name, that he considers it proper to report himself to this Govt--that he would set out from N. Y. on tomorrow (tuesday) accompanied by Commodore Lewis, for that purpose; and be in Washington on thursday or friday on his way to Montpelier, under cover always of an assumed name. The motive to...
I return you the note of your conversation in the year with Miranda. It presents him in a favorable and interesting point of view, and it can scarcely be doubted that he possessed a mind of more than an ordinary stature, improved by diversified acquirements. I suspect however that his greatest talent lay in giving them a bold relief, by a colloquial eloquence. In the single conversation I had...