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I did not receive your favor of the 11th. instant till a few days ago; and I have till now been too much indisposed to acknowlege it. You are not mistaken in viewing the conduct of the Eastern States as the source of our greatest difficulties in carrying on the war; as it certainly is the greatest, if not the sole inducement with the Enemy to persevere in it. The greater part of the people in...
I have recd yours of the 28th. Ult. The wishes of your son & of yourself, that he might be appd. to the Consulate at Leghorn had been previously made known to me; and I should have taken sincere pleasure in doing what depends on me for giving effect to them, had the way been sufficiently open; being well persuaded that your son merits all the confidence which is claimed for him. Mr. Appleton...
On the receipt of your letter, I made enquiry of Mr. Latrobe concerning the young French Engineer to whom Commodore Decatur referred; and found that he had returned to France. He is the Mr. Surville named in the inclosed communication from Mr. Latrobe . This paper grew out of the conversation I had with him on the occasion; and will I hope aid your efforts in carrying advantagiously into...
The inclosed has just been handed to me from Mr. Latrobe. You will say to him what you think proper on the subject. Accept my esteem & friendly respects Vi .
I have recd. yours of the 28. Apl. I have always regarded Mr. Latrobe as the first Architect in our Country, and particularly distinguished by his uniting with science & taste, a practical acquaintance with the minutest details of the art. He is considered as also well skilled in what belongs to the profession of a Civil Engineer, and of course with what relates to the improvements under your...
I duly received your letter of March 4. inclosing a Resolution of Feby. 22. by the General Assembly of Virginia; and urging the importance of providing for the protection of the Chesapeake Bay, which is the object of that Resolution. Concurring fully in the views you have presented of the extended interests which are connected with the Waters of the Bay, and of the use that can be made of them...
I omitted to forward the inclosed. I know nothing of the writer but from the letter itself; and send it merely that you may have an oppy. of judging whether it be worth your further inquiry thro’ Mr. Adams. Accept my best respects Vi .
I have recd yours of the 30th. ult: It will afford me pleasure to promote your wishes on behalf of Mr. Armistead; and the pleasure will be increased by my recollections of the period & persons to whom you allude. It is incumbent on me at the same time to remark that it is the usage, to leave to the heads of Depts. the selection of their own Clks. which the law vests in their discretion &...
I have duly recd. your letter of the 18th. inclosing a commission for me as one of the Visitors of the Central College in Albemarle. With a reservation of the time required by my remaining duties at this place, I shall with pleasure contribute my services in promoting the welfare of so beneficial an Institution. Accept my esteem & respect Vi .
I had made up a decision on the case of your Nephew, previous to the rect. of your favor of the 23d. Ult: and with every disposition to respect the considerations which it suggests. The course which occurred as best calculated to reconcile all proper considerations was that of disapproving the sentence of the Court, so as to restore Col: N. to his Stand in the army, and of declining the usual...
I am sorry to hear of your attack of rheumatism both on your own account & that of the public, & as I think you will have to go on as soon as you are able. I believe that immediately on the pacification with England , a vessel was dispatched to France for the Ultimatum of that government as I presume. Turreau was earnest in giving assurances that Napoleon would revoke his decrees, considering...
I did not know, till mr Patterson called on us, a few days ago, that you had passed on to Washington . I had recently observed in the debates of Congress , a matter introduced, on which I wished to give explanations more fully in conversation which I will now do by abridgment in writing. mr Randolph has proposed an enquiry into certain prosecutions at Common law in Connecticut , for libels on...
I now inclose you the Agricultural catalogue . I do not know whether I have made it more or less comprehensive than you wished. but in either case you can make it what it should be by reduction or addition. there are probably other good books with which I am unacquainted. I do not possess the Geoponica, nor Rozier’s dictionary. all the others I have & set them down on my own knolege, except...
On enquiry of mr Randolph I find his process for rolling his seed corn in plaister varies a little from what I told you. he first dilutes the tar with water stirred into it to such a consistency as will make the plaister adhere. corn is then put into a trough & diluted tar poured on it & stirred till the whole of the grains are perfectly coated. there must be no surplus of the tar more than...
According to your request, I ruminated, as I journeyed here on your proposition for the establishment of an Agricultural Society . on my arrival here, I committed to writing what is in the inclo sed it will be a better proof of my willingness, than of my comp etence to be useful to the design. it is meant however but as a rough dra ught until it can re cieve the amendments of more skilful...
You took the trouble of reading my former letters to mr Eppes on the subject of our finances, and I therefore inclose you a third letter to him on an important branch of the same subject, banks, for your perusal, if the volume does not appear too formidable. be so good as to stick a wafer into the letter and put it into the shortest post-line for Ça-ira which is his nearest post-office.— I...
Your favor of yesterday is this moment recieved and furnishes me matter of real regret: because there is nothing just & honorable which I would not cheerfully do for yourself or any member of your family. but the case in question stands thus. while I lived in Paris , I became acquainted with Thomas Appleton of Boston , then a young man, and recommended him to the old Congress as Consul for...
I duly recieved your two favors of the 3. & 6 th . I was engaged in the moment in preparing some necessary orders before my departure to see my brother , and could not therefore immediately answer them. the circumstances respecting Appleton , and my particular d connection with them I knew must be unknown to you & of course could not be under your view in asking my interference. I do not yet...
Your favor of the 16 th I received yesterday your favor of the 16 th inst. informing me that the General assembly had been pleased to appoint me one of the Directors of the board of public works recently instituted by them. the spirit with which they have entered on the great works of improvement and public instruction will form an honorable epoch in the history of our country, and I sincerely...
As the outer letter may be to go into different hands I place in a separate one my thanks for your kind offer of the comfortable quarters of your house in the event of my acting as a Director of the public works. but at the age of 73. volunteer journies are out of the question. those to Bedford are of necessity. for them however I chuse my own time, am there with one or two nights only...
Your favor of Mar. 22. has been recieved. it finds me more laboriously, and imperiously engaged than almost on any occasion of my life. it is not therefore in my power to take into immediate consideration all the subjects it proposes. they cover a broad surface, & will require some developement. they respect I. Defence. II. Education. III. the Map of the state. this last will comprise 1. an...
In my letter of the 2 d inst. I stated, according to your request what occurred to me on the subjects of Defence and Education; and I will now proceed to do the same on the remaining subject of your’s of Mar. 22. the construction of a general map of the state. for this the legislature directs that there shall be I. a topographical survey of each county. II. a General survey of the Outlines of...
I am very happy in any opportunity of endeavorin g to be useful to one of mrs Norton ’s family, with whom I had great intimacy at that period of life when impressions are strongest & longest retained. I fear however that a birth in the offices at Washington will be uncertain. they are rarely vacated but by death. I have written however to the two heads of departments with whom I am more at...
I learn that you have recieved D r Byrd ’s journal on the survey of our Southern boundary , from mr Harrison of Barclay . it is a work I have wished to see, and if you think yourself at liberty, when done with it, to trust it in my hands for perusal only, it shall be promptly and safely returned by mail. if you do not feel entirely free to do this, I will write to request it of mr Harrison . I...
I wrote to the Secretary of State on the subject of mr Arm i stead , and have recieved his assurance that if there is a vacancy, or should be one in any of the departments, he will exert himself to procure it. I wrote to him of preference, because more intimate with him than with any other of the heads of departments, and for a reason still more interesting, which I will explain to you as I...