Thomas Jefferson Papers
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Duane, William" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
sorted by: editorial placement

Thomas Jefferson to William Duane, 20 April 1812

To William Duane

Monticello Apr. 20. 12.

Sir

I inclose you a pamphlet on a subject which has, I believe been little understood. I had expected that it’s explanation would have gone to the public thro’ the medium of a trial at bar: but, failing in that, I have thought it a duty to give it through the ordinary medium of the press. I wish it could have appeared in a form less erudite. but the character of the question, and of those for whose use I wrote it decided that of the work. had it gone on to trial, my Counsel would have clothed it in a more popular dress.

We are then, it seems, to have no intermission of wrongs from England but at the point of the bayonet. we have done our duty in exhausting all the peaceable means of obtaining justice, and must now leave the issue to the arbitration of force. I have no fear of the award, and believe that this second weaning from British principles, British attachments, British manners & manufactures, will be salutary, & will form an epoch of a spirit of nationalism and of consequent prosperity, which could never have resulted from a continued subordination to the interests & influence of England

I had asked the favor of you in a former letter to let me know what I was in your debt. I am sensible how much the Editors of papers suffer from the irregularities of their subscribers. with myself these would certainly not take place were there a reciever at hand, or even within the state. but the difficulty of making small and fractional remittances to distant states, and the want of a general medium transmissible in a letter, and current in all the states, is a great obstacle, and much greatest with the inhabitants of the country. it has occasioned my discontinuing every paper out of my own state, except yours & the National Intelligencer. having occasion to make a larger remittance to mr Benjamin Jones, an iron-dealer of Philadelphia, I have included with it a sufficient surplus to enable him to pay my arrearages with you, and have desired him to do it; renewing at the same time my request to yourself to inform him of the amount. Accept assurances of continued esteem & respect.

Th: Jefferson

PoC (DLC); at foot of first page: “Colo Duane”; endorsed by TJ. Enclosure: Jefferson, Proceedings description begins Thomas Jefferson, The Proceedings of the Government of the United States, in maintaining The Public Right to the Beach of the Missisipi, Adjacent to New-Orleans, against the Intrusion of Edward Livingston. prepared for the use of counsel, by Thomas Jefferson, New York, 1812; Sowerby, nos. 3501, 3508; Poor, Jefferson’s Library, 10 (no. 604) description ends .

Index Entries

  • Duane, William; letters to search
  • Duane, William; TJ sends batture pamphlet to search
  • Duane, William; TJ’s account with search
  • Great Britain; TJ on war with search
  • Jefferson, Thomas; Books & Library; subscriptions search
  • Jefferson, Thomas; Opinions on; war with Great Britain search
  • Jefferson, Thomas; Writings; The Proceedings of the Government of the United States, in maintaining the Public Right to the Beach of the Missisipi, Adjacent to New-Orleans, against the Intrusion of Edward Livingston search
  • Jones, Benjamin; makes payments for TJ search
  • National Intelligencer (Washington newspaper); TJ subscribes to search
  • subscriptions, for publications; newspapers search
  • The Proceedings of the Government of the United States, in maintaining the Public Right to the Beach of the Missisipi, Adjacent to New-Orleans, against the Intrusion of Edward Livingston (Thomas Jefferson); TJ distributes remaining copies search