You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Dallas, Alexander James
  • Period

    • Madison Presidency

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Dallas, Alexander James" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 1-32 of 32 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I tender my sincere congratulations on the occasion of your counsel and services being engaged for the public, and trust they will feel their benefit. the post department to which you are called is the most arduous now in our government, and is that on which every other depends for it’s motion. were our commerce open, no degree of contribution would be felt; but shut up as it is, the call on...
De Your favor of Feb. 21. was recieved in due time. I thought it a duty to spare you the trouble of reading an useless answer, and have therefore delayed acknoleging it until now. not having revised the library for many years, I expected that books would be missing without being able to conjecture how many, and that in that case a deduction should be made for the deficient volumes. I have gone...
I have recd. yours without date, inclosing the letters from Mr. Hall & Mr. Forsythe which are now returned. A letter was lately sent to the Secy. of State from Govr. Early, recommending a successor to Mr. Harris, as District Attorney for Georgia. I forget whether it was the same gentleman as is the subject of the letters from Messr. H. & F. If it was, the appt of Mr. Davis may take place;...
I have recd. yours of the 20 & 21. to which the arrival of the mail enables me to add, that of the 22d. I return the letter from Genl. Jackson inclosed in the first, and the letters from Forsyth, Russel, Govr. Holmes, and Jessup inclosed in the 2d. The last is a very interesting document, and shews the writer to be a man of excellent sense, as well as a shining warrior. The aspect of things in...
It is represented to me from a very respectable source in Kentucky, that Messr. Ward & Taylor, (army Contractors) are men of real patriotism & integrity, that their services have been particularly critical & meriterious, and that they are threatened with absolute ruin, in consequence of their pecuniary exertions, unless they can be immediately aided by anticipations of what will be due to...
Since my last I have recd. the inclosed from the two W. Contractors. I have determined to set out for Washington on the 1st. of June, and shall probably have the pleasure of being with you, on Monday next, if not sooner. It may be expected that by that time the multiplying arrivals from Europe, will put us in possession of the state of things there, which ought to influence measures here....
I have just recd. yours of the 29th. Ult: I return approved your proposition for the sale in the Ordinance Dept; also your recommendation for provisionally retaining Mr Lennard. I am under the impression that Mr. Monroe wrote to Govr. Cass, on the subject of the Indians on that frontier, and took the steps necessary for having the peace notified to them. Be that as it may it is proper that...
It is very desirable to promote the wishes of Governor Tompkins, and the interest of the State of New York; but there are national views of the subject which must be combined with them. All transactions with the Indians relative to their lands are more or less delicate; a removal of them from one region to another is particularly so as relates to the effect on the Indians themselves and on the...
The Commercial Convention with G. B. has just reached me. It abolishes the discriminating and countervailing duties, and establishes the rule of the most favored nation, between the U. S. & the B. Dominions in Europe. The equality of the vessels of the two Countries extends to the cases of bounties & drawbacks, as well as of duties; with a reservation to the parties of a right, to regulate &...
According to request in your’s of the 12 th I will give the best statement I can of Isaac Briggs ’s case with the joint aid of memory and the papers to which I have recourse. After the acquisition of Louisiana it became extremely interesting to the government of the US. that the communication between Washington & New Orleans should be made as short and rapid as possible. it seemed to me very...
When the law past laying a direct tax, & established the offices of Assessor & Collector, as it appeared that the first of these officers would be of extreme importance to the landholders, whose property would be taxed very much at his will, I consulted such principal men of our district as I was able to see, and there was but one opinion on the subject. all agreed they would rather trust to...
My other two letters being on distinct subjects, and to go perhaps into other hands, I write this separately. will you pardon a criticism on your tariff which the public papers have given us compleat, but as yet without the report explaining it’s principles? having written to Europe for some wines, I was led by curiosity to look at that part of the tariff to see what duties I should have to...
I have received your letter of yesterday communicating your purpose, of resigning the Department of the Treasury. I need not express to you the regret at such an event, which will be inspired by my recollection of the distinguished ability and unwearied zeal, with which you have filled a station, at all times deeply responsible in its duties, through a period rendering them peculiarly arduous...
I have recd. & thank you for the letters for Hamburg & Bremen, which will be transmitted from the Dept. of State. We ended our journey last evening. With the exception of a short pelting shower on the day we set out, the weather & the roads were peculiarly favorable. I found the prospects of the farmers generally far better than I had expected; The wheat fields much better, untill I reached my...
I return your communications of the 12th. inst. with my approbation of what you propose in relation to the Cumberland Road. Perplexing as this business is, it will become more so I fear, if Mr. Shriver should withdraw from it. He has, notwithstanding the impatience of some, more of the public confidence than will probably be enjoyed by a successor. And if a distrust of the Agent be added to...
I return the papers inclosed in yours of the 27th. Concurring in the opinion of the Comptroller founded on his statement of the Case of the Schooner Mary. Still, I do not think a pardon proper. I am not sure that it would be correct to decide the question of a remission under the Act of Congs. which I believe submits it exclusively to the Treasury Dept. The case may therefore lie over for...
I have received yours of the 29th. of June, with the several papers sent with it. Under the difficult circumstances of the currency, and the obligation to attempt a remedy or at least an alleviation of them, the place you have in view is entitled to a fair experiment. You do right however in reserving a discretion to judge of the sufficientcy of accessions by the State Banks. Should there be a...
I have recd. your several letters of the 5. 7. 8. & 11th. Your statement in the case of Mr. Hassler, was sanctioned & sent to the Treasy; as was the proposed purchase of a Custom-House at Boston. Be so good as to have issued a Commission for Mr. Plumer, as Loan Officer for N.H. The recommendations of Mr. Wentworth are very weighty; but being local, justify the preference of Mr. P. who is...
I have just recd. yours of the inclosing Mr. Hasslers letter on the subject of the Observatory. I had previously recd. one from Col: Lane, informing me of the selection made by Mr. H. for its site. Altho’ I had no doubt of the fitness of any spot preferred by Mr. H. taken in the abstract, it occurred that as the whole square would be acquired, the expence to the public might be very...
I have recd. yours of the 16th. inclosing the propositions of Mr. Hassler, the Report of the Collector of Philada. and the letter from Mr Irving. The importance of the object, and the peculiar fitness of Mr. Hassler for it, prescribe an acquiescence in his terms. Will it not be better to throw his paper into the form of instructions and explanations accompanying his appointment, than to let it...
I have recd. yours of the and return the N. York Memorial inclosed in it. Interpositions for relief in such cases are of a delicate nature when proceeding from the Legislative the most competent authority. When claimed from the Executive, they are peculiarly delicate. The only ground on which the latter can proceed, seems to be that of increasing the security of the revenue, by suspending a...
I have recd. yours of the 23d. inclosing a letter from Mr. Baker, with the draft of an answer; and a letter from Wm. Js. Sears of Bermuda. The subject of Mr. Bakers letter, regularly belongs to the Dept. of State: But whether addressed to the Treasury Dept: or to that, ought to have proceeded from the Minister, & not from the Consul otherwise than thro’ the Minister. From courtesy, which as...
Col: McCobb has just handed me yours of the 3d. inst. The recommendations of him for the vacant office he seeks, appear to be decisive. I have referred him however to you for a communication of the result. That there may be no unnecessary delay, I write by the present oppy. to the Dept. of State, to forward immediately a blank commission to you, if there be one on hand already signed: and if...
I have recd. yours of the 6th. inst: I have approved the contemplated purchase of a Custom House in N.Y. as I do your proposed instructions to the Bank Commissioners, on the subject of preparatory arrangements. It is to be hoped that Judge Hall will have taken the course you allude to. Should he have failed even to ascertain the offers to subscribe within the prescribed period, the delay may...
I have recd. yours of the 27th. Finding that you have been detained at Washington, I regret the more my detention here. I dropped you a few lines on the supposition that you had proceeded to Philada. addressing at the same your Reported view of our finances to Washington, and passing it thro’ the hands of Mr. Crawford as preparing him for his new and arduous trust. Mr. Monroe has not yet...
I return the answers of the Banks to the Treasury proposition. Some of them, I observe, are sore at the idea of their yielding to the temptation of gain, in prolonging the refusal to resume specie payments. The best mode of repelling the suspicion would be to dispose of their public Stock, and thus reduce their dividends. Whilst they refuse to co-operate with the Treasury, that circumstance...
I have duly recd. yours of the 11th. The difficulty which gave rise to the letter from the Treasurer is much to be regretted, and the regret is increased by the cause of it. The condition at which you glance would have been justly imposed on Mr. Sheldon. His nomination to the Senate was postponed to what was considered as the latest date, with reference in part at least to a protraction of his...
I have recd. with your two letters of the 20 & 21. the General Sketch of the Finances to which they refer. That of the 25th. has also just come to hand. I return the Sketch under an Address to Washington, passing it thro’ the hands of Mr. Crawford with a request that he would hasten it to the department. The document embraces all the points occurring to me as requisite to be touched, and...
I have just recd. yours of the 1st. inst: and anxiously hope that this will find you perfectly recovered from your indisposition, and in the bosom of your family in Philada. I repeat my thanks for the kind attention you offer to the routine of the Treasury business, from which I calculate on your being speedily released. I ha ve written to Mr. Lowndes on the vacancy approaching in the War...
It being finally arranged that Mr. Crawford will enter the Treasury Department on Monday next, I lose no time in apprizing you of the day, on which the requisition on your kind and protracted attention to its duties, will be at an end. The letter offering the War Department to Mr. Lowndes, having been sent to N. York missed of him altogether; and it unluckily happened, that he set out, after...
On the establishment of the offices of Assessor & Collector of the land tax, the first being all-important to us, I recommended , on a consultation with others a mr Peter Minor for it: but the office of Collector being given to an inhabitant of this county the principle of geographical distribution prevailed for the other in favor of a mr Armistead . the present Collector
The approaching meeting of Congress requires that I should be making preparation for the event. The paragraph relating to the Finances will be a very important, and happily a very pleasing one. Persuaded that your peculiar familiarity with the subject is as yet little impaired, I am tempted by your experienced kindness, to intrude so far on moments belonging to other objects, as to request...