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I was not long at the Adelphi, but soon removed to private lodgings, which by the way were ten times more public, and took apartments at Mr. Stokdale’s, in Piccadilly, where Mr. Laurens had lately lodged before me.Here I had a great opportunity of learning, for Dr. Bret was at the next door, the state of the current literature of London. I will not enlarge upon this subject at present, if...
Mr. Thaxter was at last dispatched with all our letters and papers; and in due time we received from him the following letter: To the ministers plenipotentiary of America for making peace. L’Orient 20th Sept. 1783. Gentlemen—I have the honor to acquaint you that I arrived here in the morning of the 18th inst. and had the mortification of finding that the packet in which I was to have taken...
To his Excellency Elias Boudinot, Esq. President of Congress. Passy, 10th Sept. 1783. Sir—On the third instant, definitive treaties of peace were concluded between all the late belligerent powers except the Dutch, who, the day before settled and signed preliminary articles of peace with Great Britain. We most sincerely and cordially congratulate congress and our country in general, on this...
After the signature of the definitive treaty on Wednesday, the third day of September, 1783, we all went according to invitation, and Mr. Hartley with us, to Versailles, and joined all ambassadors who had signed the other treaties, and dined amidst mutual congratulations, with the Comte de Vergennes. There appeared to us, however, a littleness, too much resembling low cunning, to become a...
For the sake of harmony and ananimity Mr. Jay and Mr. Adams very readily agreed with Dr. Franklin to strike out the commencement of the letter to Mr. Livingston as first drawn up by Mr. Jay, and concluded to leave it out. The part left out is as follows: Sir—We have had the honor of receiving by captain Barney your two letters of the 25th and 21st of April last, with the papers referred to in...
Mr. Hartley’s Propositions for the Definitive Treaty—June, 1783. 1. That lands belonging to persons of any descriptions, which have not actually been sold shall be restored to the old possessor, without price. 2. That an equal and free participation of the different carrying places, and the navigation of all the lakes and rivers of that country through which the water line of division passes...
My last letter contained the journal of the 19th of June, 1783, and completes the copy of that journal, which was intended for no eye but my own: but which by a sudden thought was intended to be sent to Jonathan Jackson, Esq. peradventure, to furnish him with some hints to defend the American ministers, or at least to apologize for them in the case, that was very probable, of a motion of...
By this time we were pretty well convinced that the coalition cabinet would do nothing by treaty, but leave all to the king’s absolute power by his orders in council; and I became more inattentive and frivolous than ever, if that is possible, in my diary. Such hower as it is, I shall lay all of it before the public, which was laid before congress, though not a quarter part of it was ever read...
Mr. Hartley’s memorial—June 1, 1783. The proposition which has been made for an universal and unlimited reciprocity of intercourse and commerce between Great Britain and the American United States requires a very serious consideration on the part of Great Britain, for the reasons already stated in a memorial dated May 19, 1783, and for many other reasons, which in the future discussions of the...
Paris. June 14, 1783. Gentlemen—Permit me to address the enclosed Memorial to your excellencies, and to explain to you my reasons for so doing. It is because many consequences now at a great distance, or unforeseen by us, may arise between our two countries, perhaps from very minute and incidental transactions, which in their beginnings may be imperceptible and unsuspected as to their future...
The journal of the 22d of May 1783, proceeds— Mr. Hartley’s observations and propositions left with the American ministers, the 21st of May 1783: A proposition having been offered of the American ministers for the consideration of his Britannic majesty’s ministers, and of the British nation, for an entire and reciprocal freedom of intercourse and commerce between Great-Britain and the American...
The Journal proceeds—1783, May 22, Thursday. This morning I drew the following letters too be laid before the ministers this evening. Paris, May 22, 1783. Sir—We have received the letter you did us the honor to write us on the day of this month, containing a brief state of the of the United States in your hands. We see the difficulties you are in, and are sorry to say that it is not in our...
The journal proceeds—1783, Monday, May 5th.—Dined with my family at comte Sarsefields. The dukes de la Vauguion and de la Rochefaucault, Mr. Jay, &c. were of the party. 1783, Tuesday, May 6.—Dined at Mr. Jay’s. Lt. General Mullville, who is here to solicit for the inhabitants of Tobago the continuance of their assembly and trials by jury, was there. 1783, Wednesday, May 7.—Dined at Mr....
Rough draft of the passport for British Ships. We, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and John Jay, three of the ministers plenipotentiary of the United States of America for making peace with Great Britain, to all captains or commanders of ships of war, privateers, or armed vessels belonging to the said states or to either of them, or to any of the citizens of the same, and to all others whom...
The preliminaries of peace were signed and I was weary of writing in the night. I do not find that I kept any journal during the remainder of the winter, until the month of May, 1783. I spent my time in looking at France, in the court and the city, in the theatres, churches, and especially in the palace, where the courts of justice are held. This survey of the laws, government, history,...
Some honourable gentlemen, from the ardor of their benevolence to me, and their laudable desire to excite jealousy, envy, and hatred between me and Mr. Jay, for the public good: have been pleased to publish to the world assertions concerning the negotiations of the peace of 1782, which ought to be subjected to their own “ Analysis of Investigation .” 1. One honourable gentleman has printed,...
When the conferences between the British and American ministers were first opened, or very soon afterwards, the former demanded the cession of the whole Province of Maine. They pretended that it was no part of the province of the Massachusetts bay, and therefore no part of the American confederacy, and consequently not included in their commission nor in ours—that the boundary between the...
The Journal proceeds—1782 Nov. 29, Friday. Met Mr. Fitzberbert, Mr. Oswald, Mr. Jay, Mr. Laurens, (for the first time) and Mr. Stratchy, at Mr. Jay’s Hotel D’Orleans; and spent the whole day in discussions about the fishery, and the Tories.—I proposed a new article concerning the fisheries. It was discussed and turned in every light and multitudes of amendments proposed on each side, and at...
The Journal proceeds—1782—November 26—Tuesday—Breakfasted at Mr. Jays, with Dr. Franklin, in consultation upon the propositions made to us yesterday by Mr. Oswald.—We agreed unanimously to answer him, that we could not consent to the article respecting the refugees as it now stands. Dr. Franklin read a letter which he had prepared to Mr. Oswald, upon the subject of the tories, which we had...
“Sirs—The Journal proceeds—1782—November 21, Thursday—Paid a visit to Mr. Brantzen, and then to the Comte de Linden. Spent two hours with him. He says the king of Sweden has overwhelmed him with his goodness; is perpetually writing to his ministers to compliment and applaud him, for the part he has acted in refusing to go to Vienna, and for the reason he gave for it. Says the revolution in...
The Journal proceeds—November 18, 1782.—Returned Mr. Oswald’s Visit. He says Mr. Strachy, who sat out the 5th, did not reach London until the 10th. Couriers are three, four, or five days in going, according as the winds are. We went over the old ground, concerning the tories. He began to use arguments with me, to relax. I told him he must not think of that, but must bend all his thoughts to...
I shall now proceed with that obnoxious Journal:— Monday, Nov. 11, 1782. Mr. Whiteford, the Secretary of Mr. Oswald, came a second time; not having found me at home yesterday, when he left a card with a copy of Mr. Oswald’s commission, attested by himself, (Mr. Oswald.) He delivered the copy, and said Mr. Oswald was ready to compare it to the original with me. I said Mr. Oswald’s Attestation...
As my object is to deposit as much about information concerning an interesting period of our history, as remains in my possession, and that they may not be scattered like the season’s leaves and like my friend Samuel Adams’ papers, I think it proper to send you some other copies which happen to be in my power.— To B Franklin, Esq. Paris, 5th June, 1782. Sir—Mr. Laurens, while under confinement...
The instructions of congress to Mr Jay, as minister to the king of Spain, were never communicated to me. At least, I have no recollection, and can find no copy or memorandum of them. One link in the chain will therefore be wanting. But to furnish all in my power, and to shew to the attentive inquirer, the refinements and double refinements of the Comte de Vergennes’ policy, the following...
Instructions to the Hon. John Adams, for the treaty of peace, dated 14th August, 1779 . Sir—You will herewith receive a commission, giving you full power to negotiate a treaty of peace with Great Britain, in doing which you will conform to the following information and instructions— 1st. The United States are sincerely desirous of peace, and wish by every means consistent with their dignity...
The information given me by Mr. Ridley upon my arrival in Paris, that Dr. Franklin had written to Mr. Jay at Madrid to obtain his vote for Mr. William Temple Franklin to be secretary of legation to the commission for peace, was a mistake; as appears by the following documents: To all to whom these presents shall come, Benjamin Franklin and John Jay, send greeting. Whereas the United States of...
In my first personal interview with Mr. Jay in private, between him and me alone, that minister opened and related to me in detail, the transactions which had passed after his arrival at Paris, from Madrid, and before my arrival on the 26th of October. Mr. Jay informed me, that after the arrival of Mr. Fitzherbert’s latin commission, which you have already published, the Comte de Vergennes...
The Hague, October 8th; 1782—Wrote to Secretary Livingston—“At 12 o’clock to-day I proceeded, according to appointment, to the state house, where I was received with the usual formalities at the head of the stairs, by Mr. Santheuvel, a deputy from the province of Holland and Mr. Van Linden, the first noble of Zealand, and a deputy from that province, and by them conducted into the chamber of...
The Hague, September 23, 1782—wrote to Mr. Secretary Livingston: “As this is a moment of great expectation; news of the greatest importance from the East Indies, the West Indies and North America, from Gibraltar, from Lord Howe’s fleet, and the combined fleets being hourly looked for, I take this opportunity to return to the Spanish Minister Comte Llano, a visit which I owed him. The Comte...
The Hague, September 17, 1782—Wrote again to Mr. Secretary Livingston, “This morning I was in conference with Mr. secretary Fagel in order to make the last corrections in the language of the treaty, which is to be executed in English and Dutch, as that with the crown of France was in English and French. We have now I hope agreed upon every word, if not every point. Nothing now remains but to...
The Hague, September 17, 1782—Wrote to secretary Livingston—“You will naturally inquire, whether the neutral powers will continue their neutrality? or whether the neutral confederacy will be broken? No certain answer can be given to those questions. We must content ourselves with probabilities, which are indeed strong for the continuance of the neutrality.—Who indeed should break it? The...
The Hague, September 12, 1782—wrote to Mr. Livingston: “Your letters express a desire that I should endeavor to form an acquaintance with the representatives of crowned heads, and you seem to be of opinion that much may be learned from their conversation. It is very true, that hints may be dropped, sometimes, which deserve to be attended to, and I shall not fail to avail myself of every...
The Hague, Sept. 6, 1782—Wrote to Mr. Secretary Livingston, “In your letter of the 5th of March, you ask, whether this power has entered into any treaty with France since the war, and whether any such thing is in contemplation? They have made no treaty, but a convention concerning recaptures, which you must have seen in the papers. The East India Company have concerted operations with France...
The Hague, August 22, 1782—wrote tosSecretary Livingston—“Their high mightinesses have at length received their instructions from all the provinces, and I have this day been in conference with the grand committee, who communicated to me the remarks and propositions on their part. To this I shall very soon give my replication, and I hope the Affair will be soon ended. I was received in state,...
Another original letter of the Count de Vergennes to Dr. Franklin or sending him Mr. Adam’s correspondence. A Versailles Le 31 Juillet, 1780. Le caractére dont vous étes révétu, Monsieur, votre sagesse et la confiance que je mêts dans vos principes et dans vos sentimens, m’engagent à vos communiquer la correspondance, que je viens je avoir avec Mr Adams. Vous trouverez, Je pense, dans les...
The president De Thou introduces his history with “Pro veritate historiarum mearum deum ipsum obtestor.” Although I shall not follow the example of this great historian in this solemn appeal, in which perhaps he is singular, yet no man ought to commit any thing to writing as history, or as memorials to serve for history, without a strict regard to truth. I shall therefore designedly conceal...
I had prepared a memorial to the states general according to my instructions, but as the French ambassador procrastinated and the prospect of a negociation for peace with England opened, I grew daily more and more indifferent about the triple or quadruple alliance, and said no more upon the subject. The project which was written but never presented, was in these words: High and mighty lords,...
July, 1792. It appeared to me of some importance that my countrymen should be informed of the constitution of the bank of Amsterdam, and to this end I made all the enquiries in my power, in times that could be spared from other more important occupations, and prepared for congress the following sketch, which with the notes upon it, contained, as I was informed, a correct account of it. A...
The Hague, June 15, 1782—Wrote to Secretary Livingston. “This morning, I made a visit to the grand pensionary of Holland, Mr Van Bleiswick, and had a long conference with him, concerning the plan of a treaty of commerce which is now under consideration, and endeavored to remove some of his objections; and to explain to him the grounds and reasons of certain articles which have been objected to...
AMSTERDAM, 26th April, 1782—The following note to Mr. Hodshon, omitted in the order of its date must not be ordered here because it is connected with one of the most intricate and vexatious transactions that I ever found to puzzle me in all my life. Mr. Hodshon is desired to make the necessary inquiries, and as soon as he will give me under his hand his engagement to furnish congress with four...
Extract from the Register of the resolution of the States General of the United provinces, Friday, the 19th of April, 1782. Deliberated by resumption, upon the address and the ulterior address, made by Mr. Adams, the 4th of May, 1781, and the 9th of January, the current year, to the President of the assembly of their high mightinesses, to present to their high mightinesses his letters of...
AMSTERDAM, April 7, 1782, wrote to Mr Dubbledemutz at Rotterdam: “I have received your favour of yesterday inclosing a Gazette with a new petition or address to the magistrates of the city of Rotterdam. While the people entertain such sentiments and hold such a language, their liberties and prosperity can never be essentially in danger. I should be very happy to see you at any time while I...
The resolution mentioned in my last of Holland and West Friesland, is as follows— Extract of the resolutions of the lords, the states of Holland and West Friesland, taken in the assembly of their noble and grand mightinesses, Thursday, March 28, 1782. Deliberated by resumption, upon the address and the ulterior address of Mr. Adams, made the fourth of May, 1781, and the ninth of January, 1782,...
Petition to the Burgomasters and Regents of Amsterdam . The subscribers, all merchants and manufacturers of this city, with all due respect, give to understand, that the difference arisen between the kingdom of Great Britain and the United States of America, has not only given occasion for a long and violent war, but that the arms of America have covered themselves with a success so happy,...
Amsterdam, March 19, 1782—Mr. Adams is very sensible of the honor done him in the polite card of Madam Van Berckel of this day’s date; but has the mortification to be conscious, that he is not the anonymous person alluded to, and therefore has no title to the genteel acknowledgments for the present or the billet. The happy auspices of a future connection between the two nations, which appear...
Soon after the petition of Leyden, I transmitted to Congress the following address of thanks with a further petition. To the noble, great and venerable Lords, the great Counsel of the city of Leyden: The undersigned manufacturers, merchants and other traders interested in the manufactures and fabrics of this city, give respectfully to understand— That a number of the undersigned having taken,...
Amsterdam, March 5, 1782—wrote to Mr. Bergsma: “Sir, I have received from the hand of Mr. Menkema, the resolution of the states of Friesland of the 26th of February. I beg you would accept of my best thanks for the honor you have done me, in communicating to me, so early, this important measure—a resolution which does so much honor to that spirit of liberty, which distinguishes your province;...
Amsterdam, March 1st, 1782.—wrote to the duke De La Vauguion “As Friesland has taken the provincial resolution to acknowledge the Independence of America, it seems to be high time for me to prepare for the execution of my instructions from Congress of the 16th of August, which I had the honor to communicate to your Excellency, on the 25th of November, and which had been previously communicated...
Amsterdam, Feb. 24, 1782—wrote to Mr. Dumas: “Your favor of the 23d is just come to hand. Thank you for your care and skill in the purchase of the house; and will do honour to your bills whenever they appear, by paying the cash. Madame La Comtesse de Wickrad, according to your relation, made me and our state a most elegant compliment, for which you will be so good if you please to make my...
Amsterdam, Feb. 21, 1782, wrote to the Hon. Robert R. Livingston, Secretary of State for foreign affairs. Secret and confidential.—Sir, I know very well the name of the family where I spent the evening with my worthy friend Mr.——, before We set off, and have made my alphabet accordingly; but I am on this occasion, as on all others hitherto, utterly unable to comprehend the sense of the...