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Petition to the Burgomasters and Regents of Amsterdam . The subscribers, all merchants and manufacturers of this city, with all due respect, give to understand, that the difference arisen between the kingdom of Great Britain and the United States of America, has not only given occasion for a long and violent war, but that the arms of America have covered themselves with a success so happy,...
Mr. Hartley’s memorial—June 1, 1783. The proposition which has been made for an universal and unlimited reciprocity of intercourse and commerce between Great Britain and the American United States requires a very serious consideration on the part of Great Britain, for the reasons already stated in a memorial dated May 19, 1783, and for many other reasons, which in the future discussions of the...
Extract from the Register of the resolution of the States General of the United provinces, Friday, the 19th of April, 1782. Deliberated by resumption, upon the address and the ulterior address, made by Mr. Adams, the 4th of May, 1781, and the 9th of January, the current year, to the President of the assembly of their high mightinesses, to present to their high mightinesses his letters of...
The Hague, Sept. 6, 1782—Wrote to Mr. Secretary Livingston, “In your letter of the 5th of March, you ask, whether this power has entered into any treaty with France since the war, and whether any such thing is in contemplation? They have made no treaty, but a convention concerning recaptures, which you must have seen in the papers. The East India Company have concerted operations with France...
Mr. Bristed, in his Hints, p. 389 to 413, has published some account of an affair which he says John Adams quashed. Whether this is a reproach or an honor, the public will judge from the Documents. On the 25th of August, 1798, I received at Quincy, the following Letter from the Secretary of State. (No. I.) Trenton, August 21, 1798. Sir—I enclose a letter which I received last evening, under...
Some honourable gentlemen, from the ardor of their benevolence to me, and their laudable desire to excite jealousy, envy, and hatred between me and Mr. Jay, for the public good: have been pleased to publish to the world assertions concerning the negotiations of the peace of 1782, which ought to be subjected to their own “ Analysis of Investigation .” 1. One honourable gentleman has printed,...
AMSTERDAM, April 7, 1782, wrote to Mr Dubbledemutz at Rotterdam: “I have received your favour of yesterday inclosing a Gazette with a new petition or address to the magistrates of the city of Rotterdam. While the people entertain such sentiments and hold such a language, their liberties and prosperity can never be essentially in danger. I should be very happy to see you at any time while I...
In a former letter, it was suggested that I found myself obliged to say something of the peace of 1783. Mr. Hamilton, in his pamphlet, page 7, says, "The principal merit of the negociation with Great Britain, in some quarters, has been bestowed on Mr. Adams; but it is certainly the right of Mr. Jay, who took a lead in the several steps of the transaction, no less honorable to his talents than...
AMSTERDAM, June 15, 1781—wrote to Congress: “The long expected courier has at last arrived at the Hague from Petersburg. The Contents of his dispatches are not public, but all hopes of immediate assistance from the armed neutrality seem to be dissipated. The question now is what is to be done next? Some are for alliances with the House of Bourbon and America; but a thousand fears arise....
1780, December 9th—wrote to general James Warren, (among many other things, some too trifling, others mere repetitions of what has been said in other letters, and some perhaps, too severe to be worth transcribing:) “I am of your mind concerning flags to England, and importations from thence. There has been too much weak communication, which must be cut off.—The design of the Dutch is to keep...
On the 17th day of November, 1779, I embarked for Europe, with the hon. Francis Dana, Esq. and Mr. John Thaxter. The former was appointed by Congress, secretary of legation to my two commissions.—There could not have been found in the United States a gentleman in whose education, connections, talents, integrity and personal friendship, I had more entire confidence. The latter I had taken from...
The Hague, June 15, 1782—Wrote to Secretary Livingston. “This morning, I made a visit to the grand pensionary of Holland, Mr Van Bleiswick, and had a long conference with him, concerning the plan of a treaty of commerce which is now under consideration, and endeavored to remove some of his objections; and to explain to him the grounds and reasons of certain articles which have been objected to...
DESIROUS to inform Congress of every step of my proceedings, I wrote a letter, on the 15th in these words, to the President: Paris, July 15, 1781. Sir, I have the honor to enclose a copy of a letter to the Comte De Vergennes, and of certain articles and their answers. The British Court proposed to the Imperial Courts, a congress, upon two preliminary conditions, the rupture of the treaty with...
THE gentlemen of the Senate informed me, that they came to confer with me on the subject of the nomination of Mr. Murray to France; that there was a considerable dissatisfaction with it, and they desired to know for what reasons I had preferred Mr. Murray to so many others abroad and at home. My answer to the gentlemen was, that I thought Mr. Murray a gentleman of talents, address and...
The journal proceeds—1783, Monday, May 5th.—Dined with my family at comte Sarsefields. The dukes de la Vauguion and de la Rochefaucault, Mr. Jay, &c. were of the party. 1783, Tuesday, May 6.—Dined at Mr. Jay’s. Lt. General Mullville, who is here to solicit for the inhabitants of Tobago the continuance of their assembly and trials by jury, was there. 1783, Wednesday, May 7.—Dined at Mr....
THE message mentioned in my last letter, was in these words: Gentlemen of the Senate , The proposition of a fresh negociation with France, in consequence of advances made by the French government, has excited so general an attention and so much conversation, as to have given occasion to many manifestations of the public opinion, from which it appears to me, that a new modification of the...
On the 13th of July I wrote to the Comte De Vergennes the following letter: Paris July 13, 1781. Sir, I have the honor to inclose to your excellency, some remarks upon the articles to serve as a basis of the negociation for the re-establishment of peace, which you did me the honor to communicate to me. As I am unacquainted, whether you desired my sentiments upon these articles, merely for your...
I mentioned in a former letter that Congress had separated from me my friend, Mr. Dana, and sent him as a public minister to the court of Russia, from whence he communicated to me the following correspondence. A Letter from the French Minister at St. Petersburgh, to Mr. Dana, St. Petersburgh, August 22, O. S. 1781. Sept. 2, N. S. Sir , I have received the letter which you did me the honor to...
I had prepared a memorial to the states general according to my instructions, but as the French ambassador procrastinated and the prospect of a negociation for peace with England opened, I grew daily more and more indifferent about the triple or quadruple alliance, and said no more upon the subject. The project which was written but never presented, was in these words: High and mighty lords,...
To his Excellency Elias Boudinot, Esq. President of Congress. Passy, 10th Sept. 1783. Sir—On the third instant, definitive treaties of peace were concluded between all the late belligerent powers except the Dutch, who, the day before settled and signed preliminary articles of peace with Great Britain. We most sincerely and cordially congratulate congress and our country in general, on this...
AMSTERDAM, June 26, 1781—wrote to congress: “The Rubicon is passed! A step has been at last taken by the regency of Amsterdam, which must decide the fate of the Republic. The city of Amsterdam finding that their proposition of the 18th of last month was not sufficient to change the conduct of Administration, have ventured on another manœuvre. On the 8th of this month, as soon as the states of...
For the sake of harmony and ananimity Mr. Jay and Mr. Adams very readily agreed with Dr. Franklin to strike out the commencement of the letter to Mr. Livingston as first drawn up by Mr. Jay, and concluded to leave it out. The part left out is as follows: Sir—We have had the honor of receiving by captain Barney your two letters of the 25th and 21st of April last, with the papers referred to in...
The president De Thou introduces his history with “Pro veritate historiarum mearum deum ipsum obtestor.” Although I shall not follow the example of this great historian in this solemn appeal, in which perhaps he is singular, yet no man ought to commit any thing to writing as history, or as memorials to serve for history, without a strict regard to truth. I shall therefore designedly conceal...
AMSTERDAM, June 29, 1781—wrote to Congress: “On the 21st of this month, the field marshal, the duke Louis of Brunswick, presented to the States General, the following paper High and Mighty Lords, It is not without the greatest reluctance, that I see myself forced to interrupt the important deliberations of your High Mightinesses, and to have recourse to you, in an affair which indeed regards...
At first I intended to encumber your paper with no Documents but such as were absolutely necessary for my own vindication. But as the peace with France in eighteen hundred was not only an event of great importance in itself, but produced demonstrations of the prejudices, passions, views, designs and systems of parties, more perhaps than any other; I hope you will allow me room for such other...
Amsterdam, December 25, 1781—wrote to congress: “There has appeared an ulterior declaration, in addition to the ordinances of the thirtieth of April and the third of November concerning the navigation and the maritime commerce of the subjects of Prussia, during the present war. The ordinances, which the king has caused to be published of the 30th of April and third of November of this year,...
In a A Letter from Alexander Hamilton concerning the Public Conduct and Character of John Adams Esq. President of the United States printed at New York for John Lang, by George F. Hopkins, 1800. Copy right Secured; the Subject of the Negotiation with France in that year is considered. In the twenty fourth page it is Said that “The Session which ensued the Promulgation of the Dispatches of our...
The preliminaries of peace were signed and I was weary of writing in the night. I do not find that I kept any journal during the remainder of the winter, until the month of May, 1783. I spent my time in looking at France, in the court and the city, in the theatres, churches, and especially in the palace, where the courts of justice are held. This survey of the laws, government, history,...
Amsterdam, January 1st, 1781—wrote to Congress: “The mail from London arrived this morning, brought us for a new year’s entertainment, the following MANIFESTO. George R. Through the whole course of our reign, our conduct towards the States General of the United Provinces, has been that of a sincere friend and faithful ally. Had they adhered to those wise principles which used to govern the...
AMSTERDAM, May 23, 1781—wrote to Dr. Franklin: I have the honor of your letter of the 19th, with its enclosures and thank your excellency, for the pains you have taken to communicate the news from America: which can scarcely be called bad, though Gen. Green lost the field. I had before received and published in the Amsterdam Gazette, the same accounts.—The gazetteers are so earnest after...
In the latter end of December, 1781, I concluded to present myself a second time to the President of their high mightinesses, for an answer to my former memorial, and drew up a memorial in English and French; but as I had reason to believe the Duke De La Vauguion and the Comte De Vergennes would not now oppose me, but on the contrary would be pleased by being consulted, I communicated my...
Mr. Hamilton, in his pamphlet, page 28, speaking of Talleyrand’s dispatches, says, “overtures so circuitous and informal, through a person who was not the regular organ of the French government for making them, to a person who was not the regular organ of the French government for receiving them, &c. were a very inadequate basis for the institution of a new mission.” Here, again, Mr....
1781, January 18—wrote to Mr. Mazzei, at Florence: “Yesterday I received yours, of the 19th of October. Some time since, I received the other, of the 19th of August: both went to Paris, and I being here, Mr. Dana and Mr. Thaxter forwarded their enclosures to America, according to my desire, but I am not able to say in what vessel. In consequence of Mr. Laurens’s calamity, I am ordered to...
During my absence, which was nearly through the whole month of July, the following state papers were translated by the gentlemen of my family, whom I left in Holland, and transmitted to Congress, or to be kept for me to sign, according to my directions after my return. Amsterdam, 5th July, 1781—“The following is an extract from the registry of the Resolutions of their high Mightinesses the...
AMSTERDAM, May 8, 1781—wrote to Dr. Franklin: “I have the honor of your letter of the 29th of April, and according to your desire have inclosed a list of the bills accepted with the times of their becoming due; and shall draw for the money to discharge them, only as they become payable and through the house of Fizax & Grand. I sincerely congratulate you upon the noble aid obtained from the...
As my object is to deposit as much about information concerning an interesting period of our history, as remains in my possession, and that they may not be scattered like the season’s leaves and like my friend Samuel Adams’ papers, I think it proper to send you some other copies which happen to be in my power.— To B Franklin, Esq. Paris, 5th June, 1782. Sir—Mr. Laurens, while under confinement...
Though I thought I was negociating for peace , to better purpose in Holland than I could in France, yet as I could not be responsible for that, I was obliged to depart. The adventure of a journey, which, in the hands of Sterne, would make a sentimental romance, are of no importance here. On the 7th day of July, 1781, I wrote the following note to the Comte de Vergennes. Versailles, July 7,...
In pamphlet , page 27, it is said that the great alteration in public opinion had put it completely in the power of our executive to control the machinations of any future public agent, of France. Therefore Philadelphia was a safer scene of negotiation than Paris. Mr. Hamilton’s erroneous conceptions of the public opinion may be excused by the considerations that he was not a native of the...
The Hague, September 17, 1782—Wrote again to Mr. Secretary Livingston, “This morning I was in conference with Mr. secretary Fagel in order to make the last corrections in the language of the treaty, which is to be executed in English and Dutch, as that with the crown of France was in English and French. We have now I hope agreed upon every word, if not every point. Nothing now remains but to...
1781, February 1st—wrote to Congress: “One of the most brilliant events which has yet been produced by the American revolution, is the following TREATY OF MARINE, Concluded at Copenhagen, the 28th of June, 1780, Old Style, between her Majesty the Empress of Russia, and his Majesty the King of Denmark and of Norway, for the maintenance of the liberty of neutral mercantile navigation , and in...
This people must have their own way: They proceed like no other; there cannot be a more striking example of this, than the instructions given to privateers and letters of marque. The commander is ordered to bring his prizes into some port of the united provinces, or into the ports or roads of the allies and friends of this republic, especially France, Sweden, North America or Spain. And the...
On the 24th of August, 1780, transmitted to Congress, by another conveyance, duplicates of the declarations of Sweden, Denmark, &c. relative to the maritime confederation. September 4th, wrote to Congress, news that the outward bound West-India fleet of 52 sail, and five East-Indiamen, on the 9th of August, fell in with the combined French and Spanish fleets, about sixty leagues from Cape St....
Mr. Hamilton , in his pamphlet, page 21, speaks of the anterior mission of Messieurs Pinckney, Marshall and Gerry, and says, “it was resolved to make another, and a more solemn experiment in the form of a commission of three.” When I first read this sentence, I am not certain whether it excited most of astonishment, indignation, contempt, or ridicule. By whom was this Measure resolved ? By...
Amsterdam, Feb. 21, 1782, wrote to the Hon. Robert R. Livingston, Secretary of State for foreign affairs. Secret and confidential.—Sir, I know very well the name of the family where I spent the evening with my worthy friend Mr.——, before We set off, and have made my alphabet accordingly; but I am on this occasion, as on all others hitherto, utterly unable to comprehend the sense of the...
In page 28, Mr. Hamilton acknowledges that "the President had pledged himself in his speech, (he should have said in his message) to send a minister, if satisfactory assurances of a proper reception were given." Notwithstanding this, Mr. Hamilton, and all his confidential friends, exerted their utmost art and most strenuous endeavors to prevail on the President to violate this pledge. What can...
AMSTERDAM, February 7th, 1781—wrote to Congress: “By the tenth article of the treaty of alliance with France, the Most Christian King and the United States agree to invite or admit other powers who may have received injuries from England, to make common cause with them, and to accede to that alliance, under such conditions as shall be freely agreed to, and settled between all the parties.”...
Amsterdam, August 16, 1781, wrote to congress—“Mr. Temple has held offices of such importance, and a bank so considerable in America before the revolution, that his return to his native country at this time cannot fail to cause much speculation, and it is to be feared, some diversity of sentiments concerning him. As he came from London to Amsterdam, and did me the honor of a visit, in which he...
ON the 20th of September, 1780, wrote to his excellency Joseph Reed, Esq. President, and the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, in answer to a letter recommending Mr. Searle and his mission, that he might depend upon every civility and assistance in my power, consistent with the duties of the place I was in. Mr. Searle was sent by them to Europe, to borrow money. Such was the distress...
IN page 25, is a strain of flimsy rant, as silly as it is indecent. “The supplement to the declaration was a blameable excess.” It waved the point of honor, which after two rejections of our ministers, required that the next mission, should proceed from France. Where did he find this point of honor? If any such point had existed, it had its full force against the second mission: and its...
The Hague, October 8th; 1782—Wrote to Secretary Livingston—“At 12 o’clock to-day I proceeded, according to appointment, to the state house, where I was received with the usual formalities at the head of the stairs, by Mr. Santheuvel, a deputy from the province of Holland and Mr. Van Linden, the first noble of Zealand, and a deputy from that province, and by them conducted into the chamber of...