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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 31-60 of 310 sorted by recipient
I wrote to you on the 26 of August, and sent my Letter to N york to go in a dispatch vessel. I did not at the time know of the Humiliating and disgracefull Catastrophy which had befallen the city of Washington!! nor have I language to describe my feelings at the Torpor which blinded the Government to a sense of their danger, and their defenceless situation The Capitol is destroyed, but America...
I have recd. your Letter of Oct. 27. 1814. and that of 26. of November. I congrtulate you on the harmony between you and your Colleagues an inexpressible Felicity of which I have not always been So fortunate as to enjoy the Sweets. I congratulate you also on the Peace and the glorious moment in which the News of it arrived. The Raptures of Joy I leave the Newspapers to describe. It is my...
The young Gentlemen are all flying to Europe, and apply to me for Introductions to our Ambassador in London. You must Shake hands with them all, invite them to a dinner on Mutton and Brockoli, with your Wife and yourself; but Entertainments a la mode you cannot give. The Corps diplomatique, will say “Adams lives “dans le plus infame Œconomy” their Coachmen and Footmen will look down on yours...
I congratulate you on the new acquaintences you have made. Madam de Stael and Sir Francis D’Ivernois are illustrious personages who will make a figure in history; a more splendid figure, that I can expect; or even than you can hope. Madam I never had the honor to see. With her handsome Lord I have enjoyed many a diplomatic dinner sometimes at his own hotel, and if I was not mistaken he had...
In the first place I will inform you, as I know how very particular you are, that I have received No 9 and 10 with its enclosures, the last of which I have sent to your old friend the good Revd: Pere, by Mr Smith ten minutes after its reception this morning at 10 oclock. In the next place you will observe that I have number’d my letter and that you are indebted to me two numbers. my first was...
By mr. Tarbel, who left here the last of Nov’br I wrote to you, and to mrs Adams, introducing him to you, as the Grandson of our Ancient, and beloved Friend, dr. Tufts, who then enjoyed his faculties and was active in buisness—but upon the 8th of this month, closed a Life of virtuous usefullness. having finishd the works assignd him, he fell asleepe asleep—for his death was not preeceeded by...
Your kind letter arrived just in time to cheer us. Charles and I were both quite sick, but are now thank God much better, though Dr. Galloway has order’d me to keep him at home for some days, the weather being uncommonly cold, and the Bridge not likely to be put up for some days. We have nothing new. there is some talk of the Emperor’s return, some say immediately, others not untill August....
This day compleats Eight weeks since you embarked for Russia. I would fain flatter myself that you have arrived at your destined port—the British Ship Squirel arrived at Halifax whilst mr Boylstone was there; who sailed for that place the Same day that you sailed for st petersburgh. the commander of that Ship informd him; that he had boarded the Horace upon the 21 of August, and that Mr Adams...
I feel so uneasy, on your account, that I want to write to you, every hour. But I am become so great a Coward, that I dare not write any thing to you. I never take my Pen, but with the utmost Anxiety, last I should hurt your Feelings, embarrass your Employments, give you unnecesary solicitude for your Country or excite a useless gloom on the prospect before Mankind. Shall I give you a History...
I received your three last numbers they arrived nearly at the same time No. 14 on Friday and 15 & 16 on Saturday. I am much concern’d at the prospect of affairs with you, and am fearful that the English will put it out of your power to return home, as soon as you think as I understand there is positive information here , that you will be kept on in the same manner, and that no Ministers will...
God bless it— mr Jones was so obligeing as to come this morning to Quincy, to inform us that he was to Sail this week for st Petersburgh and that he should be happy to take Letters to you, that he proposes to pass the next winter there, This gentleman is the Son of mr J Th Jones Since he left Colledge he has been in France. he appears an intelligent well informed young Gentleman; he is not...
To Shew the pretty, little, easy task you have undertaken, let me give you a Schematic Picture of the publick and private Courses in a German University, for Six months. 1. Encylopedy, and Method of Studies. An encyclopedick course of general Litterature, of the divisions and Subdivisions, and of the relations of Sciences among themselves. A course on the method to be pursued, in Academick...
Altho I sent Letters yesterday to go by our Ministers from N York, yet a new opportunity offering I readily embrace it. mr Tuckerman has kindly sent us word that he is permitted to go in a vessel from Norfolk to Gottenburgh, and will take any Letters we may have, as his Brother the Rev’d mr Tuckerman came in his behalf, and will wait untill I write you a few lines my Letter must be short. I...
I know not whether you are acquainted with the Bearer of this Letter Samuel G. Perkins Esqr, or his Lady a Daughter of the aged and Honourable Stephen Higginson Esqr. Mr Perkins was one of my Associates in the Board of Trustees and Visitors. We have thought it, a fortunate Opportunity, Politicks apart, to Send your Sons with Mr and Mrs. Perkins, and their Son about Johns age, and especially as...
I had the honor to write you, on the 18th: Nov. 1811, since which I have been deprived of the pleasure of any of your always highly esteemed favors. I heard with the most sincere sorrow, it had been the Divine Dispensation, to afflict you & your dear Lady with the loss of your little Daughter, I wish it was in my power to offer any Consolation on an occasion so trying & distressing; but alass...
No 39 arrived in due time and I have for some time been perpetually satisfied with the Post Office I hope however that we shall not long stand in need of their civilities as I am rather impatient to have you home the rappid approach of winter encreases my impatience and as the event of this negociation appears to be still unfavorable I cannot help feeling fretful and half angry at the delay...
I am not about to write you much upon War or peace. You must have enough upon those Subjects in public papers. My principal Topicks will be to inform you that We are all in unusual good health, have had an uncommonly fine Autumn and that We are all extreamly desirous of Seeing you all return to our Embraces. But none of Us can conjecture how it will be possible for you to get home, unless you...
The Opportunity by Captain Benjamin Harrod is so unexpected and the time allowed me is So Short, that I can only Say We are all Well and your Son very good as well as very healthy. We hear and read Such Accounts of unavoidable Expenses where you are, that our frugal Country We fear will not enable you to do your Errand. Our Reading has been all about Russia Life of The Empress Porters Travels...
I was much disappointed at the receipt of your last letter having flatter’d myself that you would have had some letters from our friends both in Boston and Washington The Conservateur of to day announces that you have at last recieved the answer to your last Note and that it is of so favorable a nature that peace will be the consequence of the truth of this I can form no opinion but the report...
I am induced to furnish you with a list of my friends who interrested themselves for me and solicited the Government that I might be appointed Secretary of the Legation to this Court least you should receive an erroneous impression and believe that my pretensions rested solely upon the recommendation of Govr. Tompkins & Judge Van Ness. Col Marinus Willett wrote to Mr. Monroe. Mr Riker Reorder...
This Letter is to be honoured by the Reverend Samuel Cooper Thatcher, the Son of The Reverend Dr Peter Thatcher of Brattle Street and the Grandson of Oxenbridge Thatcher Esqr Barister at Law One of the most intimate confidential and beloved Friends I ever had one of the four first rate Lawyers, Gridley, Pratt, Otis and Thatcher who recommended me to the Court in Boston in 1758 when I was Sworn...
I was never more at a loss what to Say to you than at the present moment. to accuse you of neglect, I cannot I will not, for I do not beleive it possible! Yet so unfortunate have I been, that not a line has reachd me from you, of a later date than the 1st of May. Two packets have since been received, containing Letters for your Father, your Brother, and for your Sons, but not a solitary Line...
I feel Some Compunction, when I recollect the long time that has passed Since I wrote you a Line. Indeed I Could take no pleasure in Writing, nor you in reading continual Narrations of Wounds Bruises, Sicknesses Amputations and Deaths, among those you Love, as I did with the most ardent and well merited Affection. I could only recommend Epictetus’ Antoninus, and St Paul, all of whom you know...
This Letter will derive some merit from its being the latest date, and I hope will reach you soon. it comes to inform you that mr Tarbel has Letters for you—your Father has given you his opinion respecting the publication of the extract of his Letter to dr price by mr Morgan. I send you the copy from the original and am ready to ask mr Morgan, in the words of the play. “who was the dupe? with...
You must laugh at the information contain’d in my last as Mr. Harris tells me he wrote you by the same post that the resignation was accepted Mr. H.—as far as prevarication goes is certainly a good diplomat for he came to me very full of what I wrote you and told me he had it from the Gentleman himself. he was here last night with what he wrote you and at the same time stating that the...
We live in dayly, hourly hopes of Letters from you at Paris. I wrote you by the Milo Capt Glover, and have written by the New Packett Captain Bronson, who is to carry your Sons under the care of Mr Samuel G. Perkins and his Lady. Two of our belle Esprits, the Greek Professor and Mr Ticknor, go in the Same Ship. The opportunity is favourable for our young Gentlemen, as far as We can judge. The...
For three weeks past there have been many & various reports in circulation respecting the Mediation to Russia & there has been much Said and written respecting the persons to be appointed. It was not untill yesterday that your Father & I was officially notified that mr Gallatin and Bayard were associated with you in a commission to Negotiate a Peace between Great Britain and the united States,...
I See by the paper that a cartel is to sail from Newyork for Gottenburgh. altho I have written to you frequently of late, by our ministers, mr Clay and Russel, and again by mr Tuckerman, who sails from Norfolk, yet I know it will give you pleasure to hear every day, that your parents, and your children are well. George and John, who are both attentive to their Studies, have lately past a few...
At the Request of Mr Quincy, I inclose to you, his Speech on the Admission of States into the Union which are Situated beyond the Limits of the 13 original Confederates. You will want none of my Comments upon it. Your Authority is quoted in it, in Support of its Principle. The Prophecies of Quincy’s imagination are not altogether chimerical; tho I hope the fulfillment of them is far, very far...
I inclose a Slip with an Essay in it, Signed Richlieu The Editor has poisoned it, with a Silly introduction; but that will not hurt it with you, ‘tho’ it Spoils it here. Who this Connecticut Gentleman is, I cannot conjecture. I did not believe, and cannot yet believe, that there is Brains enough, united with Courage and application enough, in that State to produce Such a paper. Trumbul?...