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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John Quincy" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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Mr Andrew Bigelow, whose Character you will learn from the inclosed Letter from the President of Harvard Colledge, will be the Bearer of this Letter; and I pray you to give him a kind Reception, and if convenient let him See your Secretary and your Sons. Haec olim meminisse juvasit, on both Sides. I have been to the fortieth Independance. My Reveries would amuse You. Do you think my...
Your Letter of May 6th. like all your other Letters for more than 20 years has been a cordial to me. I approve of your judicious Œconomy in the purchases of Books. I have need of Parcimony. Your great grandmother used often to Say “What a Mercy it is, that the Lords keeps some People poor.” If I was not poor, I should plague you to death, in hunting Books for me all over Europe. Oh! What a...
The east wind of this day, will prevent the Sailing of the Galen, and it gives me the opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your Letter of May 13th No 87; and the papers containing the Royal Marriage which came to hand last Evening: by the arrival of a vessel at N york; this interesting , and important intelligence, had been partially communicated to the publick a week before—Some...
If I write you ten Letters, to one from you, Still I Should be your debtor, for one of yours is worth ten of mine, and one over— yet in Love, and affection, the account Shall be balanced—I Shall always recollect with a pleasure, which I cannot describe, the Sensation I felt, when mr Woodard returnd from Russia and came to see me. I know well his Father, and Family, but him I had never Seen...
Your Mother who was Sick, all Winter, is recovered and restored to her characteristic Vivacity, Activity Witt Sense and benevolence. Of Consequence She must take upon herself the Duties of her Granddaughter Neice, Maids Husband and all. She must be always writing to You and all her Grandchildren which is as dangerous to her health as her domestic Exertions. I say She must because She Will....
Your N. 48. April 8. arrived last night, and put our little family Circle into the best possible humour. The Gaiety of Spirit, the perfect good humour the delicate Satyre and the perfect Knowledge of Persons and Politicks, delighted and astonished Us all. If you had more of Juvenal and less of Horace; more of Swift and less of Adison, more Caustics and less Emolients, you would be the Terror...
Altho I have written to you, more than once since I have received a Letter from you, I know how gratefull it is, to absent Friends to hear from each other, especially when to learn, that they are living; can be added, the agreable circumstance of their being in health. with gratitude to Heaven, I can Say; I was brought low, but I am raised up. I have this week visited my Friends in Boston,...
Mr Stephen Thayer whom you must have known is to carry this Letter to you. Of Braintree Origen a Son of Col. Ebenezer Thayer and Brother of a young Gentleman who studied Law with me, having been unfortunate in our late trying times is about embarking for London to revive his former Connections and renew his interrupted Business. He will have much to Say to you, concerning the Boylston Market...
“Je vienné de perdre le plus grand Homme de mon Reoyoms” said Louis 14th, on the death of the grand Condé. “Ah! tout est perdu” Said the same great little, Strong weak Monarch on the death of Marshal Turenne I repeat both these Ejaculations, with a heavy heart; on the premature and unexpected death of Mr Dexter. I cannot enlarge on this Subject. But I will Say, Mr Dexter and the late Chief...
I have already written to you by the Galen, my Letter was anteriour to the calamity which the inclosed papers will full soon, inform you of.—what can we Say? but Lord thou destroyest the hopes of man. I know not how to describe the Gloom which has overspread the public mind—To departed worth, the tear of Friendship flow’s. Party Spirit is Silent, and drops her veil, and bows acknowledging...
Mr Walker has just been here, to submit to you the enclosed letter, & for the purpose of requesting your intervention on the subject of the Nanina. your very obedient MHi : Adams Papers.
The Words Machiavelism and Jesuitism, have for 200 years passed, have been customarily employed, by the general Consent of all honest Men; to Signify a perfect Complication of Hypocricy and Knavery; of Falshood, Fraud, Perfidy, Perjury, Tyrany and Cruelty: and all this maturely and deliberately digested and established both in Theory and Practice. Pascal, the only modern Demosthenes, in his...
I have been favored with two letters from you, which, having come to hand during a most busy season, have remained to this date unacknowledged. The first, of Sepr. 27. 1815, was brought by the person to whom it referred as the medium of a communication to this Government relating to the Ships of war at Venice. Altho the description and price of such an addition to our naval force, and the...
It was not untill this morning that I received your Letter of December 5th No 79, just five months from the date. where it has been ever since, I know not. it came to me from Nyork, and had just arrived there. The subject of it, you will Remember by turning to your coppy. There is not any reasoning which can convince me, contrary to my Senses, that Three, is one, and one three. Is it possible...
On the 1st. Mr and Mrs Swelt made us happy by a Visit in which he assured Us he had Seen you, your Lady and Son and that you were all well. on the 2nd. Mr P. C. Brooks with his Son Edward made Us a very pleasant Visit to offer to take Letters or Packetts to you. This Mr Edward has a Steady Face and manly Countenance, I hope you will cherrish him. Your Brother has paid me the last Farthing, and...
Mr Edward Brooks, Eldest son of mr P C Brooks has visited us, and offerd to take Letters for us to you. his parents you know, and this young Gentleman is worthy of such parents he is said by those best acquainted with him to be a solid Sensible and correct Character—Such as will do no dishonour to our Native State, or Country. any civility in your power to show him, will be gratefully received...
Upon this day solemnized to me, by the anniversary of the death of my beloved Sister, and by the recent event of yesterday, which has cut off an other Relative from the Parent Stock, by the death of our Friend mr William Smith. my mind is so much affected, that I shall feel a releif in communicating my feelings.—I am still living, lingering upon the confines, of the Grave, where e’er this day,...
Your favours of 5. and 8th of Jan. are recd. and thankfully recd and read with inexpressible delight,—Notwithstanding your Calvinism.!!! For We Unitarians, One of whom I have had the Honour to be, for more than Sixty Years; do not indulge our Malignity in profane Cursing and Swearing, against you Calvinists; one of whom I know not how long you have been. You and I, once Saw Calvin and Arius,...
I continue to live over again. De Grimm. Tome 3d Derncire Parte, page 304, has entertained me with the following Anecdote, “Mr Beaumarchais, has obtained finally, a reparation for his little retreat to Saint Lazere. In the first place, more than a Million has been paid to him, on his Accounts with the Government. In the Second he has received from Monsieur De Callone a Letter, infinitely...
Your Letter No 80 December 27th 1815 I have received—Since my last Letter to you, which I think was in Jan’ry, I then wrote to you, under an impression, that it would prove my Last. But it has pleased Heaven to keep me yet longer from the Skies—I cannot Say, but at times, I have felt a regreet, at being like to return again to the world—of which I have, more of a prospect, than for months...
I have recd. your favour of Dec. 16th. The Chicanery on the Law of Nations, is no surprise to me. A Lawyer of 58 years standing must have been acquainted with this Hobgoblin for 58 years, even though he has been pushing Bayonettes with him the whole time. The Chicaneries which I have Seen, and felt, in the Courts of England, France, and Holland, differed very little from those at the Bar,...
John Winthrop Esqr, Son of John Winthop of Boston Merchant and Legislator, Grandson of John Winthrop Professor and Counsellor, Great Grandson of Col Adam Winthrop of Boston Counsellor descended from the good old Governor, is destined to Bremen Where he expects to be Consul. He was educated at Cambridge and has travelled in Europe. He married Col Hitchburnes daughter who left him three...
your Letter of Nov’br 7th allarmd me when I opend it, and Saw that it was in the hand writing of mrs Adams, and I read with trembling—while I rejoice that you have So able a Substitute, I cannot but regret the occasion for it—your hand may be restored to its use again, but your Eyes have reason to complain that you have used them too hardly. in this instance only—have you been a hard master to...
Among a million of Things I want to Say to you, which Shall I choose. Publick affairs? What are these to me? What care I, who is President or Governor, Monroe or King, Cousin Brooke or Friend Dexter. What is it to me who makes Judges and Justices Collectors of Revenue or Tide Waiters? Nevertheless, I Still interest myself in Some Things, I have read, with Eyes as bad as yours, four Volumes of...
Having been attacked this morning with a dangerous Complaint, I have requested Louisa to write you a few lines enclosing a Note, The disposition of which, I wrote you my request, in my last Letter dated December 1815—which Letter, and note, I deliver to Louisa Smith—to keep untill your return— MHi : Adams Papers.
I am induced to furnish you with a list of my friends who interrested themselves for me and solicited the Government that I might be appointed Secretary of the Legation to this Court least you should receive an erroneous impression and believe that my pretensions rested solely upon the recommendation of Govr. Tompkins & Judge Van Ness. Col Marinus Willett wrote to Mr. Monroe. Mr Riker Reorder...
By mr. Tarbel, who left here the last of Nov’br I wrote to you, and to mrs Adams, introducing him to you, as the Grandson of our Ancient, and beloved Friend, dr. Tufts, who then enjoyed his faculties and was active in buisness—but upon the 8th of this month, closed a Life of virtuous usefullness. having finishd the works assignd him, he fell asleepe asleep—for his death was not preeceeded by...
Mr Allston presents his compliments to Mr & Mrs Adams—he will do himself the honour to wait on them agreeably to thier invitation MHi : Adams Papers.
Ah! Monsieur Adams! said my learned Friend The Abby De Mably “ Je sent un grand decadence. J’avois l’habitude d’ecrire six, huit a dix heures, mais Maintenant, Je ne puis pas travaillier que deux. Apres cela il faut que Je me jette sur le lit.” The Abby was then but seventy. As I am ten years older I may now say the same thing and with less regret The Death of my most ancient venerable and...
This Letter will derive some merit from its being the latest date, and I hope will reach you soon. it comes to inform you that mr Tarbel has Letters for you—your Father has given you his opinion respecting the publication of the extract of his Letter to dr price by mr Morgan. I send you the copy from the original and am ready to ask mr Morgan, in the words of the play. “who was the dupe? with...