You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Van der Kemp, François Adriaan
  • Period

    • Madison Presidency

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 2

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Van der Kemp, François Adriaan" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 75 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
A continued headache has compelled me, to delaÿ an answer to your favour of the 16th of Febr. from daÿ to daÿ; tho I receive no higher gratifications than from these. It is indeed far beyond, what I could reasonably have flattered me with, that, in your far advanced age, you So often would have condescended, in taking notice of mÿ letters, and bestowing So manÿ marked proofs of your...
As you felt So Sensiblÿ for mÿ Sorrows, it is highly becoming, that you Should be among the first, to whom I Should communicate mÿ happier prospects. Mÿ Eldest Son John at Philadelphia did ask me, two days past, for my consent in his marriage with a Miss Julia Taylor, of a respectable familÿ and connections, with a moderate fortune, adequate to his wishes. His former prudent conduct made me...
I listen onlÿ to a pleasant emotion of my heart, in congratulating my Self, that among So manÿ blessings, with which the good God favours me till this instant, is the preservation of your precious life during another year. How precarious is it, if I Shall enjoÿ that favour once more: your age, alreadÿ above, what is commonlÿ allotted to men, mÿ own advancing years, with the frailties and...
I can but imperfectly express the pleasure, which I received from your kind favour of the 15th Dec. last—It was yet enhanced, if possible, bÿ receiving in the same instant a Letter of Rob. R. Livingston, our Late Chancellor and Ambassador to France, by whom, I supposed I was long ago forgotten. You cannot conceive, how delightful it is in mÿ situation, to be now and then remembered by the wise...
I Know you will permit me to indulge me Self in reviving mÿ drooping Spirits in writing a few lines to you—of whom’s health I had the last pleasing information from the N. papers, when I did See, that you paid ÿour last tribut of respect to deceased worth in attending the funeral of Cambridge’s President. You must now have nearlÿ reached the term of your fifteenth Lustre. I hope—this last year...
It is certainlÿ a long while, that you received not a line from me, and this nothwithstanding I was So highly gratifiede, and as it were buoy’d by your kind favour of 30 Nov. last—But—how could I do else, as I wrote not even to mÿ Son—labouring Since the three last months under an increasing debility, which Seemed to threaten the total destruction of the machine. As long however it was only a...
Although I have so lately written, I will not, as mÿ restored health can be no pretext, delaÿ for one single daÿ, to send you a few lines more; now I have seen the confirmation of the good news from Washington—and, certainlÿ, if we maÿ claim a friend’s comfort in distress, then he too must be entitled to share our joys. I do so indeed, and congratulate you and your Excellent consort most...
Unexpectedlÿ I was favoured with your obliging Letter of the 20th Febr—tho’ I did receive it only the 21 of March—having been through carelessness of our Postmaster first Send to the black River-countrÿ. The unfavorable weather domesticating me again—and old habits too rapidlÿ adopted again—occasion, that I am Since a few days not quite So well however—I Seriously intend to prevent a...
I Shall now make an experiment, if I can dispell a malignant Spirit of gloom, which hovers about me, without any other incantation besides acknowledging your both Favours of the 4th and the 9th of april with which I was So kindly honoured by you. Indeed—Sir! this intercourse is nearly the only pastime left me in my deep retreat and then mÿ Situation imperiously often forbids me to indulge...
Tu m’aduli, ma tu mi piace says anÿ where Chesterfield—but so you do in a most egregious manner—but you make your Physic so highly palatable, that it is swallowed, before reason can with sufficient coolness examine, if the encomium—so kindly bestowed is really deserved. You want not to be informed—that I am highlÿ pleased, when I am favoured with your encouraging approbation—and whÿ should I...
What Sufficient thanks Shall I return to the distinguished favours, with which your kind frendship continues to honour me in Such an eminent degree! much in truth I am indebted to your partiality towards me, but I Should lessen its real value, if I did not presume that I did not merite it in part. I will however endeavor to exert my utmost Strenght to deserve it further. The Honor of being jo...
At lenght I succeed in Sending you the outlines of the contemplated work, which I could have, wished to have been executed by you had you twenty years less. It will however not loose of its value—if the Son charges himself—with the payment of his Father debt. It is true, it requires Some Skill to prove it, altho I would not hesitate to run the risk of making it pretty evident, that you could...
Having been prevented to answer your favours of Dec. 19 Last and Jan. 9 thro Severe head-ache during a forthnight and a Succeeding cold—which is not yet past, I now begin to renew my former course—altho I am compelled to hold in the reins. In the former you insinuated to have Send me by Col. William Stevens Smith two first vol. of Amer. Acad—with the promise of procuring me this Summer the...
I presume, it is not abusing your kindness, in addressing you with a few lines, to assure you of mÿ Sincerest thanks for the unexpected gift of Quincÿ Adam’s Lectures—which you have bestowed on me. What enhances the value of this present, is that Seems to have been a mark of filial affection of a beloved Son, now endorsed to me bÿ your own hand. It is mÿ misfortune—Madam! that I can onlÿ...
I am So much younger—I have not So manÿ avocations—I have nothing better to perform; it is mÿ chief recreation in mÿ Solitude, to correspond with mÿ friends: all this I deem a Sufficient apologÿ for writing So often, and I flatter my Self, It Shall be one for you, even if I interrupt you in more Serious concerns, or take hold of a few precious moments, intended devoted to weightier affairs. I...
As head-ache and high-flying winds do confine me at home I Shall indulge myself in answering a number of Letters—now before me—and make a beginning with your favours. This is allways a pleasant task, which makes me often forget present cares, and not over-anxious of future ones, which maÿ hover around me. You will participate with me in my feelings, when I inform you, that among the last...
I have now before me your favour of July the 15th, with which, as usual, I was highlÿ gratified. I could have wished, to have delay’d its answer longer, till the assaults of that relentless Demon of head-ache had been abated, who possesses me again Since three weeks, but I know not, to what charm he will listen—So that I must Submit with resignation, till he is tired of the contest. Indeed...
He published—his opinions on Jus Eccles. Protest . in the Ses—which were—under his presidium—defended publicly by his most eminent Students. This could not be performed without awakening the intolerant zeal of the clergy—Their rage—increased when manÿ of their Brethren Strengthened him with their open Support—then the Church became in danger. Spies—under pious pretexts were Send to him for...
Although I know not, if I Shall be able to finish this Letter—being not free from head-ache—I dare not longer delaÿ the answer of your favour of 28 oct. Tho no visitants steal mÿ moments—devoted to labour or leasure, the avocations in a Similar Situation of mine are So various, that I often must Sacrifice to these, what I intended for correspondence or mÿ own amusement. Now I have again been...
Although I am not perfectlÿ free from head-ache a fixed oppression in the forehead which leaves a disagreable Stupor, and without whose removal I shall be unable to return to my charge with usual alacrity, I got in so far the better of it, that I take up mÿ pen and I hope, ere long it shall again be in mÿ power to expel everÿ gloomÿ thought by plunging head long in Philosophical enquiries:...
Having at length finished mÿ Researches on Several points in Nat. Hist. in the theories of Mess. Buffon and Daubenton—which have been extended to 270 Pag. in 4th. and a are readÿ for the press, if I can find a printer and a corrector of the Language, of which I have little prospect—and being free of head-ache—I must again address you with a few lines, in the flattering hope, that they Shall as...
I am again favoured with your kind letter of Jan. 23. It bears with it the usual Stamp of Serenity and health of bodÿ and mind. Maÿ both be continued as long you become not entirely dissatisfied with your abode here—and maÿ everÿ occurrence, which might distress either be long time averted! I presume—neither I think, that I presume too much, that if you visited once Smith’s valleÿ—you would...
My Sending the wreath unaccompanied bÿ a Single line was occasioned bÿ a Short excursion to Sacket’s Harbour—to take a view of the boasted powerful defence of our frontiers, after the Surprise of Ogdensburg, courted So long bÿ the iterated incursions on the defenceless and peaceble Canadiens. It was indeed a Severe retaliation from which the Inhabitants Shall not recover in manÿ years—although...
Do not Suppose, that I waited to answer your verÿ interesting letter of March 18—till I received the other promised anecdote of Quaker’s benevolence—no Sir! and I believe, you know me too well—art too well convinced of the high value I place on the distinguished proofs of your regard and frendship with which you continue to honour me, to attrbute mÿ Silence to anÿ Such unbecoming motives. The...
I can not express you—how warmlÿ I am obliged to you for your your last kind favour of May 20th. It Saÿs—nothing that it pleased and instructed—no—it did much more—It relieved mÿ drooping Spirits it dissipated in part the deep gloom, which has latelÿ taken possession of me—listen—mÿ Dear! I have one friend yet left—he would Soothe mÿ Sorrows—was he in the neighbourhood, altho he participated...
No, you will not blame me, though I make use of a Sundays afternoon—having the morning employ’d in familÿ worship—in writing to an honoured friend. This too is religion, to remember the favours, which we received, and Shew our gratitude in our good will, though it is not in our power to prove it bÿ more vigorous exertions Freed this daÿ of head-ache I must improve these moments, and...
If I should not write, except I could Send you an interesting Letter then I would but Seldom have this opportunitÿ, but I flatter mÿself, having been So long honoured with your friendship, even, when I was to manÿ an object of horror as a daring rebel, who would not crouch to Despotic power—and—when you was elevated to the highest Station in your countrÿ, when by manÿ an insignificant Western...
Never Shall be obliterated the few days, which I enjoy’d at Quincÿ—I fostered allways indeed a faint hope—to See you once more, and know, that I Should meet with a cordial reception—but never my ardent imagination did reach to that which I received—From you I expected all the warmth of an old friend—but—even if I was more presumtuous—I could laÿ no claim whatever on the numerous civilities,...
I can Scarce persuade myself, that I Staÿ’d with you So manÿ daÿs—and conversed on So few, Subjects onlÿ, upon which I did want your information. I could onlÿ glance at your Librarÿ—had no time to Satisfÿ my greedy curiosity—and forgot even to look at the consolato del mare and other rare Publications in your possession but I am apprehensive, this would have been the case had I protracted my...
I So returned from the field—having dug my patatoes, and now the rain compells me to Staÿ home, how can I better employ mÿ time; than with beginning to answer both your favours of the 4th and the 15th. how happÿ am I in this mÿ hermitage—in receiving So often Such distinguished marks of your kind remembrance. The Demon of head-ache, which has now possessed me nearly a month abated his attacks,...