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The President’s health is rather improved since my last to you. He had a bad night, but his fever is slighter than it has been at any time since his indisposition. The phisicians think him convalescent— in haste— respectfully & sincerely yrs. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as received 2 July 1813 from Washington and so recorded in SJL .
We have heard with equal astonishment and concern that Gen l Hull has surrender’d the army under his command to the British force opposed to him in upper Canada . No letter has been yet rec d from him, but communications from the Gov r of Ohio , & others in that state leavs no doubt of the fact. Till his report is made, it is impossible to form a just opinion of his conduct; but from every...
m r Rush has just left me to bid you farewell, intending, when he departed, to set out on his return to washington tomorrow. If you can keep him, I will be happy to join with him, the party, from your house , on the visit to m r Divers . But if he proceeds on his journey, it is possible that my engagments with him, may prevent me. I will join you if in my power, & at an early hour. RC ( DLC );...
I have the pleasure to return you your correspondence with the directors of the Rivanna company which I lately rec d from you. I had submitted it to the perusal of a few friends only, in confidence, and had determin’d for the present, at least, not to publish it, from a fear that the publication might lead to some unpleasant discussion. you will have seen by the news papers that, I have been...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred several resolutions of the House of Representatives of the 21st ult, requesting information on certain points relating to the French decree of the 28th April 1811, has the honor to make to the President the following report: In furnishing the information required by the House of Representatives the Secretary of State presumes that it might be deemed...
I called the day after the rec t of your letter on m r Jefferson and made the offer of y r services to him in the S ui t of M r Livingston in the case of the Bat ture. I saw no objection to y r
A M r Easterley who reminds me of a conversation with him in London some years past, has requested me to make known to you a project of his for converting our tob o & corn stalks , to a purpose of great publick utility, as well as private emolument, and likewise to introduce to you M r Burroughs his agent. I have thought that I could not better promote his object than by enclosing his letter...
I intended calling on you to day, which I still hope to be able to do in the afternoon. Your letter to Mr Carter is in all respects what it should be. I intend also to write him, & will bring my letter to him to show you. I think it most adviseable that we should avoid a meeting at Mr Madisons , for the reason that has occured to you. I had intended to set out back to washington , in the...
The arrangment for the negotiations at St. Petersburg being compleated, I have the pleasure to apprize you of it, as that there will Still be time, to enable you to write to your son, by the vessel which takes his Colleagues there. The occasion was thought to be of that high importance, to require, according to the usage of our government, a special mission of three. Mr Gallatin & Mr Bayard...
During the last session of Congress the current business pressed so heavily on me, and after its adjournment, the preparation of instructions for our ministers employed under the mediation of Russia , and in other duties connected with it, kept me so constantly engaged that I have scarcely had a moment of respite since I left you. I seize one to communicate some details, which it may be...
On enquiry I found that major Armstead had been regularly appointed principal assessor for our district by the advice of the senate & been furnishd with his commission. It had been intended, as I understood, to appt M r Minor , but the office of Collector , having been disposed of in our county , it was decided on the distributive principle to confer the other office on some person in another...
my engagment in preparing instructions, for our ministers at gottenburg , Russia , Sweden , & Paris , for M r Clay & M r Russell to take with them, prevented my answering sooner your favor of the 27 th ult
The intelligence which you communicated to me the evening before I left home, of a vote having been given in the H. of C. against L d C. has not been confirmed, and I fear will not be. Little, has been receiv’d of late from Europe , but all accounts concur in the probability of a war, which Engl d prompts & leads, that will become general. Nothing can be more unprincipled than such a war,...
I was much gratified to find that you approved the ground taken with the Spanish minister , respecting the sp h colonies & in our affairs with Spain generally. the minister left this shortly after the correspondence for Phil a , on account of the ill health of his family, not in disgust as has been represented. He has since arrival there written me another letter, adhering to his former...
Judge Roane committed to my charge his opinion on the question whether the congress had power to regulate an appeal from the superior courts of the States individually, and of course from any of their courts, in cases relating to treaties & laws of the U states , with a view that I might submit it to you. He remarked that his opinion had not been deliver’d, the cause tho’ argued, being still...
The President cross’d the Potowk., after the affair of the 24th, accompanied by the attorney genl., & general mason, and remained on the south side of the river, a few miles above the lower falls, on the following day the secretary of State, likewise crossed the river, shortly after him with Mr Ringgold & rema[i]nd that night, in the same quarter, whence he proceeded & joind genl winder at...
It has been intimated to me by unquestionable authority, that a visit by you to Col: Walker would at this time be consider’d by him, an act of great kindness, & be received with much sensibility. You know the wretched condition in which he is, tortur’d by an incurable disease, which must soon take him from this scene. The idea was suggested to me before I went to Richmond , but it did not...
I do not know what particular fact or circumstance can have given rise to the apprehension lately intimated to you by our friend, which you have been so good as to notice in yours. I will state, the what has occurr’d, between the respectable character alluded to, & me, since you were here, to enable you to judge how far there is just foundation for it. The day before I had intended to set out...
Despatches are rec d from our ministers as late of the 31. ult o , at which time the negotiation was depending. On paper, serious difficulties seem to be remov’d, and few only to remain, the principal one of which is however important. Impressment is laid aside, for the reason urgd in the instructions to our ministers, which is strengthend, by being us’d as an argument on the part of the...
I had the pleasure to receive the letter which you forwarded to me through Col: Trumbull , & to apply it, with the best effect, to the purpose for which it was intended. Congress passed a law, under which a contract has been concluded with him, for the painting of four pieces; the declaration of Independance; the surrender of Burgoyne , that of Cornwallis ; & the resignation of Gen l...
This letter represents the cases of the Catharine & Julian, as proofs that the Berlin & Merlin [ sic ] Decrees were in force, and repeats its call for the instrument of revocation. With respect to this repetition of this call, I refer to the superabundant explanations already given on that subject, remarking here only that whilst F. does not profess to have revoked such part of her decrees, as...
From the date of my last letter to you the President has been ill of a bilious fever; of that kind called the remittent. It has perhaps never left him, even for an hour, and occasionally the simptoms have been unfavorable. This is I think the 15 th day. Elzey of this place, & Shoaff of Annapolis , with D r Tucker , attend him. They think he will recover. The first mention’d, I have just seen,...
I arrived here last night indisposed and must return in the stage to morrow or should have the pleasure to call on you. It was necessary that I should be present at the transfer of my property from one overseer to another, for which purpose I obtained leave of absence for a few days. M r Ritchie informed M r Coles that an anonymous communication had been sent him, stating that you had had a...
I expected to have had the pleasure of seeing you, more than a month past, and to have deliver’d to you the enclosed letters on finance in person, with a paper on the same subject, which was written in our revolution by the President , & given to me for perusal, with a request that I would forward it to you for the same purpose. The ill health of M rs Monroe , and more recently of our daughter...
At the commencment of the war I was decidedly of your opinion, that the best disposition which could be made of our little navy, would be to keep it in a body in a safe port, from which it might sally only, on some important occasion, to render essential service. Its safety, in itself, appeard to be an important object, as while safe, it formed a check on the enemy in all its operations along...
The letters to D r Jackson & mr Appleton received with yours of the 16 th shall be forwarded by the first opportunity, of which, many, frequently offer. you will settle the question between m r Short and me, whenever it may be most convenient to yourself & the arbitrators. my attendance is altogether unnecessary. I will instruct a m r York who has succeeded
It would give me real pleasure to be useful to m r arm i stead , for the reasons which you have stated, if I had the power, but there is no vacancy in the dep t of State , and so closely beset are all the dep ts , by applicants for clerkships, that opportunities rarely occur of introducing into either, any person whom we wish, however deserving of it. I have spoken to the President in m r arm
Having thought fit to commit to you the charge of borrowing on behalf of the United States, any sum not exceeding twenty-five millions of dollars, pursuant to the act entitled “an act to authorise a loan for a sum not exceeding twenty-five millions of dollars,” passed on the twenty-fourth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, I do hereby make known to you that in the execution...
To all whom these presents shall concern—Greeting: Reposing special Trust and confidence in the Integrity, prudence and Abilities of Albert Gallatin, late Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, I have nominated, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate appointed him jointly and severally with John Q Adams, James A Bayard, Henry Clay and Jonathan Russell, Minister...