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I fear that the pressure of much business, and an anxiety to avail myself of a moment of leisuir, to write to Mr Adams in reply to his kind letter, made me delay it longer than I ought to have done. I now return you the letter—which he had the goodness to submit to my perusal, and with many thanks to him for it. The sentiments which it conveys do honor to the head & the heart of the author—....
I have had the Honor to receive your Letter of the 28th ult. covering one to your Son the American Minister at St Petersburg. I fear it will be too late for the “Hornet” sloop of war: but I have had it put under cover to Mr Barlow and sent to the Collector of the Customs at Newyork, requesting him to forward it by the first safe conveyance With great Respect / I have the Honor to be / Madam /...
I have the pleasure to inclose to you a report of a the com: of the. 7th. on our for: relations with govts. in which the communications wh took place between the Ex: of the US. & the Br. govt., are review’d, & the a project of an act of congress, relative to seamen submitted to considerations—The object of the report seems to be and as it undoubtdly is, to place the controversy between the two...
Since writing the letter—inclosd, to Mrs. Adams, I have conferr’d with the President on the subject of your sons return, and am authorised to state to you, that in case of peace with G Britain, the mission to London will be offer’d to him. The conduct of your son, it gives me pleasure to state, has obtaind the entire approbation of the President.—It is hoped that it will suit his convenience...
An accident lately occurr’d which has given me great concern. The inclosed letter was received, with many others, several from your son at St Petersburg, & laid before me in the dept. of State. I opend it, without looking at the Superscription. On reading a line or two, I perceived the error I had committed, & searching for the address found the envelopes of two letters, one addressed to you,...
I have the pleasure to inclose you a copy of a report of the committee of the H. of Reps. on foreign relations, in which the communications between the Executive of the UStates & the British govt., since the war, are reviewed, and a project of an act of Congress relative to seamen submitted to consideration. The object of the report seems to be as it undoubtedly is, to place the controversy...
I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 25. ulto. in which you are so good as to express a wish for my success in the discharge of the duties of the important & difficult office, to which I have been lately appointed by the President. For this obliging communication I beg you to accept my sincere acknowledgment. Permit me to reciprocate this friendly sentiment in your favor, & to...
The arrangment for the negotiations at St. Petersburg being compleated, I have the pleasure to apprize you of it, as that there will Still be time, to enable you to write to your son, by the vessel which takes his Colleagues there. The occasion was thought to be of that high importance, to require, according to the usage of our government, a special mission of three. Mr Gallatin & Mr Bayard...
I do not know what particular fact or circumstance can have given rise to the apprehension lately intimated to you by our friend, which you have been so good as to notice in yours. I will state, the what has occurr’d, between the respectable character alluded to, & me, since you were here, to enable you to judge how far there is just foundation for it. The day before I had intended to set out...
This letter represents the cases of the Catharine & Julian, as proofs that the Berlin & Merlin [ sic ] Decrees were in force, and repeats its call for the instrument of revocation. With respect to this repetition of this call, I refer to the superabundant explanations already given on that subject, remarking here only that whilst F. does not profess to have revoked such part of her decrees, as...
I called the day after the rec t of your letter on m r Jefferson and made the offer of y r services to him in the S ui t of M r Livingston in the case of the Bat ture. I saw no objection to y r
A circumstance has occurr’d with which it may be useful for you to be made acquainted , with, merely to put you on your guard. you have doubtless seen a letter publish’d in the gazettes, which is imputed to Gen l Wilkinson & said to be written from this place in 1803. to Mr Power at N. Orleans , requesting him to use the
During the last session of Congress the current business pressed so heavily on me, and after its adjournment, the preparation of instructions for our ministers employed under the mediation of Russia , and in other duties connected with it, kept me so constantly engaged that I have scarcely had a moment of respite since I left you. I seize one to communicate some details, which it may be...
The enclosed was written before my late visit to Albemarle , and detaind in consequence of it, to be deliverd in person, but afterwards forgotten and left here. I need not add my sincere desire that you will have the goodness to decide the question to which it relates. we have nothing from abroad, immediately, concerning our own affairs; and no new light as to the result, of the great battles,...
The minister of Russia , Count Pahlen & his brother , having intimated their intention to make you a visit at Monticello , I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction. The publick character of these respectable foreigners, would, I well know, secure them your kind reception, & friendly attention, but you will be gratified to know that they have high claims from personal merit. RC (...
The inclosed was left with me by M r Rush , for your opinion, of the propriety of the measure proposed. I retaind it, in the hope of finding you alone, before we separated, for a moments conversation on the subject. The first question is, whether such a notice of the occurrence, which it is proposed to commemorate, is proper, or silent contempt, will be, more expressive, & dignified? You will...
On enquiry I found that major Armstead had been regularly appointed principal assessor for our district by the advice of the senate & been furnishd with his commission. It had been intended, as I understood, to appt M r Minor , but the office of Collector , having been disposed of in our county , it was decided on the distributive principle to confer the other office on some person in another...
my engagment in preparing instructions, for our ministers at gottenburg , Russia , Sweden , & Paris , for M r Clay & M r Russell to take with them, prevented my answering sooner your favor of the 27 th ult
The enclosed may gave you some amusment. I have read neither, and cannot therefore speak of their merits. one is attributed to armstrong & the other to winder. The book which you were so kind as to send me respecting Louisiana will be taken advantage of, in the contemplated discussion with the Spanish gov t . It shall be restord afterwards. your letter to Miss Bruff was sent to her as soon as...
The intelligence which you communicated to me the evening before I left home, of a vote having been given in the H. of C. against L d C. has not been confirmed, and I fear will not be. Little, has been receiv’d of late from Europe , but all accounts concur in the probability of a war, which Engl d prompts & leads, that will become general. Nothing can be more unprincipled than such a war,...
M r Russell has arrived at New York & is expected here in a day or two. He made the second proposition to the British gov t authorised by his instructions, which you have seen published, which was also rejected, & in terms rather acrimonious, imputing to it a character—which it did not merit. This gov t has been sincerely desirous of an accomodation but it appears that the British gov t will...
I have had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 24 th of sep r , to which I shall pay particular attention, and on which I will write you again soon. Nothing but the disasters here, and the duties which have devolvd on me, in consequence, the most burthensome that I have ever encounterd, would have prevented my writing you long since, as well as more recently. I had devoted this morning...
I was much gratified to find that you approved the ground taken with the Spanish minister , respecting the sp h colonies & in our affairs with Spain generally. the minister left this shortly after the correspondence for Phil a , on account of the ill health of his family, not in disgust as has been represented. He has since arrival there written me another letter, adhering to his former...
The suspension of payments in specie by the banks is undoubtedly a species of insolvency. At this time, the foundation of their credit with the public, in a principal degree, at least, is the stock of the u states in their possession. On it they issue their paper, for which they obtain an interest of about 7 p r cent. The u States pay them that interest on advances, on the credit of their own...
Judge Roane committed to my charge his opinion on the question whether the congress had power to regulate an appeal from the superior courts of the States individually, and of course from any of their courts, in cases relating to treaties & laws of the U states , with a view that I might submit it to you. He remarked that his opinion had not been deliver’d, the cause tho’ argued, being still...
It has been intimated to me by unquestionable authority, that a visit by you to Col: Walker would at this time be consider’d by him, an act of great kindness, & be received with much sensibility. You know the wretched condition in which he is, tortur’d by an incurable disease, which must soon take him from this scene. The idea was suggested to me before I went to Richmond , but it did not...
Ja s Monroe ’s best respects to M r Jefferson . He has the pleasure to send him the Edinburg review which M r Jefferson expressd a desire to peruse. J M. has also the pleasure to send to M r Jefferson a
It was our intention to have passed a day with you & your family while I was in the county, but many interesting concerns and duties which require my constant attention will unavoidably prevent it. The arrangments which I have to make with my brothers family who arriv’d yesterday, will also take some portion of the short term allotted to my private affairs while here. As soon as our grandchild...
Ja s Monroe’s best respects to M r Jefferson — He hastens to communicate to him the very interesting intelligence rec d this evening from the Secry of the navy , on which he gives him his most sincere congratulations RC ( DLC : TJ Papers , 199:35463); partially dated at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as a letter of 23 Sept. 1813 received the following day.
Despatches are rec d from our ministers as late of the 31. ult o , at which time the negotiation was depending. On paper, serious difficulties seem to be remov’d, and few only to remain, the principal one of which is however important. Impressment is laid aside, for the reason urgd in the instructions to our ministers, which is strengthend, by being us’d as an argument on the part of the...
I think you showd me last summer a note of the courses and distances, taken by M r R. Lewis , of my land, lying between the old road, passing by my house, & the top of the mountain, being, the first purchase, which I made of M r Carter . M r Lewis made this survey at the time & in consequence of Mr Shorts purchase. I will thank you to have the goodness to send me a copy of that survey, as it...
I receivd lately the enclosed letter from ch: Carter in which he proposes to submit the question between m r Short and me, relating to the boundary of the land purchasd of him, to your decision. I most willingly accede to the proposition, and hope that you will undertake it. It will take you a mornings ride, thro’ some rough ground, with a guide, which you may easily procure. You have all the...
An unexpected change has taken place in my situation since I had last the pleasure to see you. an invitation from the President to enter into the department of State will take me to Washington . Having accepted the office, I set out to morrow in the stage to commence its duties. this appointment subjected me, in the first intimation, to great concern, from a doubt of the propriety of resigning...
The bearer M r M c Cullock of Baltimore was introduc’d to me by a particular friend there, with a request that I would make him known to you. He is the son of the collector of that port , & represented to have made considerable progress in the knowledge of natural history, for which science he is said to have much taste and a strong passion. He has stud i ed medic i ne in Phil a , & passed the...
I have read with great interest & satisfaction your remarks on finance, which I return by the bearer. we are now at the mercy of monied institutions, who have got the circulating medium into their hands, & in that degree the command of the country, by the adventurers in them, who without mu ch capital are making fortunes out of the public and individuals. many of these institutions are hostile...
I had the pleasure to receive the letter which you forwarded to me through Col: Trumbull , & to apply it, with the best effect, to the purpose for which it was intended. Congress passed a law, under which a contract has been concluded with him, for the painting of four pieces; the declaration of Independance; the surrender of Burgoyne , that of Cornwallis ; & the resignation of Gen l...
From the date of my last letter to you the President has been ill of a bilious fever; of that kind called the remittent. It has perhaps never left him, even for an hour, and occasionally the simptoms have been unfavorable. This is I think the 15 th day. Elzey of this place, & Shoaff of Annapolis , with D r Tucker , attend him. They think he will recover. The first mention’d, I have just seen,...
I arrived here last night indisposed and must return in the stage to morrow or should have the pleasure to call on you. It was necessary that I should be present at the transfer of my property from one overseer to another, for which purpose I obtained leave of absence for a few days. M r Ritchie informed M r Coles that an anonymous communication had been sent him, stating that you had had a...
It is with infinite satisfaction that I inform you of the arrival of mr Carroll yesterday from Ghent , with a treaty of peace between the U States & G. Britain which was concluded on the 24. of Decr last . It is in all respects honorable to our country. no concession is made of any kind. Boundaries are to be trac’d on the principles of the treaty of 1783 . by Com rs , whose difference, should...
I expected to have had the pleasure of seeing you, more than a month past, and to have deliver’d to you the enclosed letters on finance in person, with a paper on the same subject, which was written in our revolution by the President , & given to me for perusal, with a request that I would forward it to you for the same purpose. The ill health of M rs Monroe , and more recently of our daughter...
J. M’s best respects to mr Jefferson. He encloses him a hand bill just receivd which seems to confirm the account of yesterday. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “M r Jefferson Monticello”; endorsed by TJ as received 11 Aug. 1815 and so recorded in SJL . Enclosure not found.
At the commencment of the war I was decidedly of your opinion, that the best disposition which could be made of our little navy, would be to keep it in a body in a safe port, from which it might sally only, on some important occasion, to render essential service. Its safety, in itself, appeard to be an important object, as while safe, it formed a check on the enemy in all its operations along...
M r Dortic mentioned in your favor of the 23 d ult o was furnishd with a passport, and a packet of newspapers was sent to the Collector at New York to be forwarded by him, which it is presumed he will receive. It happend that there was no dispatch prepard at the time for our chargé des aff rs
The President will communicate to day to the Congress , the discovery which has been lately made to the government, of an attempt of the British gov t , thro’ the gov r gen l of Canada [or at least by him, with the subsequent approbation of that gov t
The letters to D r Jackson & mr Appleton received with yours of the 16 th shall be forwarded by the first opportunity, of which, many, frequently offer. you will settle the question between m r Short and me, whenever it may be most convenient to yourself & the arbitrators. my attendance is altogether unnecessary. I will instruct a m r York who has succeeded
The President’s health is rather improved since my last to you. He had a bad night, but his fever is slighter than it has been at any time since his indisposition. The phisicians think him convalescent— in haste— respectfully & sincerely yrs. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as received 2 July 1813 from Washington and so recorded in SJL .
We have heard with equal astonishment and concern that Gen l Hull has surrender’d the army under his command to the British force opposed to him in upper Canada . No letter has been yet rec d from him, but communications from the Gov r of Ohio , & others in that state leavs no doubt of the fact. Till his report is made, it is impossible to form a just opinion of his conduct; but from every...
m r Rush has just left me to bid you farewell, intending, when he departed, to set out on his return to washington tomorrow. If you can keep him, I will be happy to join with him, the party, from your house , on the visit to m r Divers . But if he proceeds on his journey, it is possible that my engagments with him, may prevent me. I will join you if in my power, & at an early hour. RC ( DLC );...
I have the pleasure to return you your correspondence with the directors of the Rivanna company which I lately rec d from you. I had submitted it to the perusal of a few friends only, in confidence, and had determin’d for the present, at least, not to publish it, from a fear that the publication might lead to some unpleasant discussion. you will have seen by the news papers that, I have been...
A M r Easterley who reminds me of a conversation with him in London some years past, has requested me to make known to you a project of his for converting our tob o & corn stalks , to a purpose of great publick utility, as well as private emolument, and likewise to introduce to you M r Burroughs his agent. I have thought that I could not better promote his object than by enclosing his letter...