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Major Thompson belongd to a Penna. brigade in the revolutionary war, when I knew him. He was I think a subaltern. I have seen him often, since I came here, & apparently in indigent circumstances. I have always thought well of him, without any minute knowledge of him. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the House of Representatives, requesting the President to cause to be laid before that House information relative to the duties laid on articles imported from the United States into the British provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick; relative to the duties on articles exported to the United States from the said...
Mr Shaler return’d from norfolk yesterday & leaves this for new york to morrow. The Squadron, to sail under com: decatur, is prepard for sea & will sail, in the course of next week, as is understood. I hope to receive your ideas respecting instructions to the Commissrs., by to morrow’s mail. Peace without tribute is the principal object. The Commssns. sent for your signature, includes Mr....
I quartered last night near charlotte Hall, and took a view this morning at 8 oClock, from a commanding height, below Benedict Creek, of all the enemy’s shipping near the town and down the river, to the distance at least, of 8 or 10 miles. I counted 23 Square rigged vessels. Few others were to be seen, and very few barges. I inferred from the latter circumstance that the enemy had moved up the...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 13th inst, requesting the President to lay before the House such documents relative to the Russian mediation, as in his opinion it may not be improper to communicate, has the honor to transmit to the President, for the information of the House, the following letters in relation to that subject...
The Secretary of State respectfully submits to the President the nominating to the gentleman as vice consul for the Island of St. Thomas. DNA : RG 59—LAR—Letters of Application and Recommendation.
The Undersigned acting as Secretary of State to whom was referred the Resolution of the Senate, requesting the President to cause to be laid before the Senate such information in his possession, respecting the existing state of the Relations between the United States and the Continental powers of Europe as he may deem not improper to be communicated, has the honor to report: That the Relations...
Finding that my arrangments in Loudoun might be completed on the day I arriv’d there, I came down on the following day, monday. Altho the upper road is bad, I still think it will be found better than either of the others. Some letters are recd. from Mr Crawford, the most important of wh. are in cypher. They shall be forwarded without delay we have nothing from our comrs. Chauncey’s fate is...
§ From James Monroe. 8 November 1814, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to submit for your approbation the following list of appointments in the Army of the United States. “I have also to request that the enclosed list of promotions may be substituted for the list of promotions in the Light Artillery and Riflemen now before the Senate, and that the name of Garret E. Pendergrast...
I have not yet receiv’d an answer from Mr Crowninshield, respecting the Labrador coast, or the Algerine letter. The letter to Mr Harris, will be ready for Mr Coles whenever he arrives. It being pretty much a legal subject, I have availd myself of the aid of Mr Rush in preparing the dispatch. Mr Homans says that a corvette is prepard to take him, & that the cost will be inconsiderable, she...
Some very interesting domestick concerns which could not well be postponed, seconded by the state of the wound on my leg, prevented my having the pleasure of waiting on you in the last week, but I shall be with you to morrow if no accident presents an obstacle to it. I shall bring all the papers with me which it will be necessary to submit to your view at this time. Indeed many things have...
I have nothing from you to day. Col Cass has arrivd & gives the same acct. heretofore recd. from others of the surrender of Detroit. Genl Cushing thinks that a power to grant a volunteer comn., to give effect to the law, is a necessary construction of it. I shall, unless some other view be taken in the course of the day, accept such a comn. & set out in discharge of it, in a few days. A short...
I enclose you a copy of a letter sent yesterday to genl. winder, relating to the communication between Col. P. & Col: Baynes, which were forwarded to you a day or two before. A stronger paper was authorised by the heads of depts., but I afterwards moderated the terms, retaining the sense. The distinction in it, is so obvious, between the passage which expresses, the sense of the govt. on...
I send you letters from General Jackson which give an account of a victory truly glorious. It will be well to send them to Gales, except that which I have marked to be retained—unless indeed so much of the letter of the 9th. as relates to the conduct of the Kentuckey militia should also be retaind, tho I do not see how it can be, as similar statments will soon force themselves on the public RC...
I have been much engaged in my private concerns, tho’ rather indisposed, since my return home, so that I have not been able to enter on any serious business. I shall begin to day to take up the most pressing. I retain for the present Sodestroms comns., believing that their effect will be to license a trade with the enemy. I return the letters of the Secry at war and of the navy. Respectfully &...
The enemy are advanced six miles on the road to the wood Yard, and our troops retiring. Our troops were on the march to meet them, but in too small a body to engage. General W. proposes to retire, till he can collect them in a body. The enemy are in full march for Washington. Have the materials prepared to destroy the bridges. You had better remoove the records. Tr ( DNA : RG 233, Committee...
I received yours of the 5th. & 8th. this morning. I will endeavour to forward you by tomorrow’s mail a copy of the letter to genl. Pinckney, which corresponds strictly with that to Mr Baker respecting the treaty, & with what has passed between us relative to the sale of slaves in the W Indies. How much shall be given for the ransom of our people to the Dey of Algiers? I will forward for your...
I return the papers relating to Fort Washington with my entire concurrence in the result proposed in the report of Mr Dallas; that Major L’Enfant be no longer employd & that the superintendance be committed to an officer of the Corps of Engineers. I submit it however for consideration, whether a milder term than, "discharg’d" may not be used. He came into the service at a distressing period...
I return’d here yesterday morning, having been prevented arriving the preceding evening by the rain. The case with Algiers is interesting. The sentiments expressed in your letter of the 25th. which I have just received, accord in every circumstance, with those of the gentlemen in the admin. here. Anxious to communicate theirs, to you, we had an informal meeting on the subject yesterday, in...
The Secretary of State to whom was referred the confidential Resolution of the Senate of the 18th ult, has the honor in compliance therewith to submit to the President the following Papers. 1st. Instructions given by the Secretary of State to Charles Pinckney Esquire Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States at Madrid under date of the 6th. February and 10th. April 1804. 2d. The...
My affairs in Loudoun requiring in an urgent manner my presence, I shall go up to day & return on monday or tuesday next. A passport from the British Commander to take dispatches to Ghent being as I presume necessary, I have arrang’d in the dept. a letter to him for the purpose. I know of nothing that will suffer in my short absence. Respectfully your friend RC ( DLC : Rives Collection,...
The enclosed communications are highly interesting. They give a mournful view of the state of things in France. It seems probable that Boniparte’s career is at an end. He may by extraordinary good fortune surmount his difficulties; but with routed armies, an exhausted people (perhaps disaffected) Paris & Bordeaux in the hands of the enemy, his prospects may be considerd almost desperate. The...
I had an interview with Mr Bagot yesterday on the subject of the fisheries. He proposes, to allot for our use, a certain tract on the Labrador shore, lying between Mt. Joli & the strait of Belle Isle, the Esquimaux bay, a distance of more than 150 miles, being between 2. and 3. degrees. Ships which descend the St. Lawrence pass, generally, I believe, thro this strait by Mt. Joli. His idea is,...
The business with Mr Bagot being suspended, & that with Algiers an acct of the Deys letter which I have sent first to New York, & in case of seizure there, to Mr Crowninshield for translation, & that with Russia in the same state, till I get an answer from Mr Ingersol, I shall take a trip for a few days to Loudoun, to look to my harvest, & to my health. Mr Hughes has returnd. His communication...
I saw Mr. Bishop this morning, on the subject of his late letter to me, communicated to Mr. Crawford. I told him that no opinion had been formed against him, & that the representation to his prejudice, which had been made to the dept. of the Treasury, & sent to him by Mr. Crawford, had been sent to him, in a spirit of candour, to enable him to give such explanation, as he might think proper:...
I have not yet heard from Mr Crowninshield, and I begin to fear that Mr Bagot’s power relative to the arming on the lakes is of a very limited nature. Finding many admonitions that my constitution does not accord with this climate, I must move to a higher surface. I shall therefore go to Loudoun, transacting by letter thence, all that can be managed in that way, as indeed most of the business...
I returnd last night and receivd your letters of the 7th. & 8th. The letter of the Dey of Algiers, is sent to Mr Crowninshield at Salem, for an experiment, to obtain a translation of it, there, & at Boston, to be made under his auspices. It could not be translated at New York, or Phila., and I fear, that we shall have no better success, to the East. I have recd. no answer to the enquiry...
Finding by your letter recd yesterday that you would set out on that or this day, & probably be here to morrow, I resolved to await your arrival, & make a visit in the mean time to Loudoun, rather than take Loudoun in my route to Albemarle. I shall be back to morrow. 6. 24 pounders, 10. 18s. 10. 12s. 6. 6s. & 4. 8 Inch Howitzrs. are orderd to fort Pitt. They are necessary to batter & take...
I arrived here late yesterday eving. having taken Richmond in my route. I had the great satisfaction to find Mrs. Monroe & our youngest daughter in better health than I had anticipated, as I had to find Mr Hay & our eldest. The early hour at which the post rider has called renders it impossible for me to say any thing on publick affrs. by this opportunity. I shall immediately turn my attention...
The incapacity for business produc’d by so long an application to it at Washington, has been increasd since my return home by a fall from my horse, being taken off by a limb of a tree under which he passed. My head, & left shoulder were bruis’d, & my leg cut a little by the stirrup, but I have almost recover’d from these injuries. I have walk’d about to day, & expect to be able to ride...