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Owing to some accident I did not receive your letter of the 28. untill after Mr. Rush left me, which I much regret, as it deprivd me of the opportunity, of conferring with him, on the answers to be given to those of the French & Russian ministers, which accompanied it. I am astonished at the contents of both, as they put us to trials, which, if either of them had good sense or moderation would...
Col: Hawkins, will accept the offer of agent, for the boundary under Porter; and there is reason to think that they are on a very good footing. His name is "Samuel". He had better be sent in to day, and it will fortunate if he & Col: Austin go together. Consuls , I.C. Barnett (of Jersey) for Paris- Septimious Tyler of Connecticut for Bayonne- Joseph Ficklin, Kentucky, for St. Bartholomews-...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred several resolutions of the House of Representatives of the 21st ult, requesting information on certain points relating to the French decree of the 28th April 1811, has the honor to make to the President the following report: In furnishing the information required by the House of Representatives the Secretary of State presumes that it might be deemed...
I have yours of the 12. Mr Rush and I shall set out for your house on friday eveng, with intention to get as far as Fairfx ct. H. that night. We shall move slowly, so that we may not arrive, before monday or tuesday. The letter to the dey of Algiers, will, as you will find, by the translation of his, sent to you, yesterday, require much attention. The state of things there, and in Engld., and...
I have not seen Mr. Tazewell & therefore can add nothing to what I have already said respecting genl. Taylor. I am under a strong impression that Winder, Howard & Taylor ought if possible to be appointed. Perhaps, if there should be any difficulty in the business, it may be well, to send in only a part of the nominations to day. By the above, I do not mean, that Parkers pretentions ought to be...
I send many letters recd. by this mail in favor of Mr. Beaseley, which I have not had time to peruse. On the subject of the marshall, to be appointed at New York, I shall direct, by next mail, a blank comn. to be forwarded to you, and it is probable I may be with you, by the time it arrives, as I shall leave this, according to present prospects, then, for your house on my way to Washington, to...
I intended to have written you by the two last mails but was interrupted at the moment I had allotted for the purpose. In truth I had little to communicate, which it was worth troubling you with, while ingaged in packing up & preparing for your departure for this place. Mr Cutts intimated to me that you would probably leave home the beginning of this week, which, coinciding with your intention...
I enclose you a letter from Col Humphreys & also one from Col. Pike. I am glad to see by the former that some expln. can be given of the proceedings in Connecticut different from what has been imputed & suspected. Mr Serurier was with me, to day, & repeated what he had before stated of the cause of delay at Paris, & intimated that if any plan could be devised within the limit of his govt’s...
The unceasing fall of rain has so broken in on my proposd visit to, & return from Washington, to take Mrs Monroe there, as connected with the movments of my whole family, that I hardly know how to act in it. Among the papers in the packet addressd to you, is a letter from Beasley, deserving of attention. It shows to what a shameful length the practice of trading by license between France &...
I wished to obtain an interview with Bizet before I answer’d your favor of the 16th., that I might communicate to you something decisive relative to its object. Owing to his engagments at some distance, and to an injury which he lately received in blowing a rock, I could not see him till today, when I explaind fully your wishes respecting his services. He seemed to be much gratified at the...
I have yours of the 23d. Col: Aspinwall is desirous of obtaining the appointment to London as you were apprized before you left us. The principal competitiors are Col: Drayton & Com: Barney. The loss of his arm gives him I think a stronger claim than either of the others, and will perhaps reconcile both of them to his appointment. His appointment would open a place in the army for some other...
I have received yours of the 21, & 19th. instt. On a closer inspection of the details from France, there is cause to infer, that the situation of Boniparte is not so desperate, as first appearances indicated. It is suspected that Wellington has recd. a check, and beleivd that Graham at Burgen op zoom, has been repulsed. The story of Boniparte having enterd Paris at the head of 200.000. men is...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the House of Representatives, requesting the President to cause to be laid before the House a statement of the number of impressed American seamen confined in Dartmoor prison; the number surrendered, given up, or taken from on board British vessels captured during the late war; together with their places of residence, respectively,...
A great number of small objects with the necessity I was under to answer some letters, prevented my calling on you to day as I intended. I have written to the British commander to ask a passport for mr. Purviance & for a vessel to take him to our comrs., wherever they may be, & instructed mr. Skinner to take it to him without delay. I have also written to mr Pederson, & inclosed him a letter...
I have receivd yours of the 28th. april, from Monticello. The late events in France will doubtless be sensibly felt by most of the powers of Europe, and even by the U States. I suggested some ideas in my last, growing out of them, for your consideration. With those powers, generally, there is no regard for principle. Every thing is decided, by a prospect of advantage & renown. I have no doubt...
I have receivd yours of the 29th. ulto: with the project of a letter in reply to adml. Cochrane. The alterations suggested will improve it, tho’ I doubt whether I ought to enter into the subject with him. It may produce an insulting reply. I am inclined to think that it will be better to communicate with Mr Baker on the subject. I am endeavouring to collect proof of the most material facts, in...
I send you a letter from our ministers lately in London, and some from mr. Beasly, and a very important one from Mr Gallatin. Two letters from mr Crawford, the last of may 12., will be decypherd, & sent you, as soon as done. From what I see of these communications, we may expect that the British govt. will assume very high pretentions, in the negotiation, & that none of the other powers will...
I have this moment recd. a letter from Mr Hay, & several others from other persons, chiefly on private concerns, from Mr Graham, by the messenger of the dep’t. I found on my arrival, Mrs Hay much indisposed of a sore throat & fever, of which she was beginning to recover, & from which she has since so far recover’d, as to authorize a hope of our being able to set out for Washington the day...
We came here on sunday & shall proceed to Richmond the day after to morrow. We left Washington on saturday. We concurr’d in the opinion suggested in your letter that it would be proper to execute the law for reducing the army, and to permit the Squadron to sail for the Mediterenean, with instructions to keep a look out as to events, & the mov’ment of the fleets of other powers. These measures...
Nothing new has occurrd since mine of yesterday. I have yours of the 5th. Mr Eustis has been with me, & we have communicated on the subject of yours to him. He expresses a strong desire for me to take the command, & thinks that a volunteer comn., would serve the purpose. We will confer fully on this subject to day, and come to a decision, and by to morrow’s mail you shall have the result. The...
I found my family, except our gd. child, much recover’d from their indisposition. She is improving, but weak. I am in better health. I return to you Mr Jeffersons letter. The others will be forwarded to Mr Pleasanton. Mr Jefferson is in good health, & intends to make you a visit in a few days. I had intended to go to the sulphur spring, & Mr Hay had agreed to accompany me, but I find myself so...
The instructions & coms., to Mr Shaler & the commodores, and letter to the dey were forwarded yesterday, soon after the receit of which, it may be presumd, from the state of preparation in which the squadron is, that it will sail. I sent letters to the secretaries of State of all the powers in the mediteranean, notifying the measure and expressing your desire that the squadron might be recd...
3 March 1813, Department of State. “The Secretary of State to whom was referred the Resolution of the House of Representatives of 1st. Instant, has the honor to submit to the President the enclosed papers marked A & B.” RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 233, President’s Messages, 12A-D1). RC 1 p. In a clerk’s hand, signed by Monroe. For enclosures, see n. 1. The House resolution of 1 Mar. 1813,...
Your letter of the 20th. instant reached me yesterday morning. The subject which it presents to my view is highly interesting, and has received all the consideration which so short a time has enabled me to bestow on it. My wish to give you an early answer, in complyance with your request, has induc’d me to use all the dispatch which the delicacy & importance of the subject would permit. The...
To all whom these Presents shall concern, Greeting. Reposing especial Trust and confidence in the Integrity, Prudence and Ability of John Quincy Adams, at present the Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States at the Court of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, James A. Bayard, late a Senator of the United States, Henry Clay Speaker of the House of Representatives of the...
8 April 1813, Charleston. “I am directed by Judge Drayton to forward to you, for the information of the President & to receive his determination thereon, copies of certain affidavits & other papers relative to an ⟨a⟩lien enemy.” RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 94, War of 1812, Records Relating to Prisoners, entry 127-A, box 8, folder 3, bundle 163). RC 1 p. For enclosures, see n. 1. Cochran...
The President cross’d the Potowk., after the affair of the 24th, accompanied by the attorney genl., & general mason, and remained on the south side of the river, a few miles above the lower falls, on the following day the secretary of State, likewise crossed the river, shortly after him with Mr Ringgold & rema[i]nd that night, in the same quarter, whence he proceeded & joind genl winder at...
Having thought fit to commit to you the charge of borrowing on behalf of the United States, any sum not exceeding twenty-five millions of dollars, pursuant to the act entitled “an act to authorise a loan for a sum not exceeding twenty-five millions of dollars,” passed on the twenty-fourth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, I do hereby make known to you that in the execution...
To all whom these presents shall concern—Greeting: Reposing special Trust and confidence in the Integrity, prudence and Abilities of Albert Gallatin, late Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, I have nominated, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate appointed him jointly and severally with John Q Adams, James A Bayard, Henry Clay and Jonathan Russell, Minister...