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Ja s Monroe ’s best respects to M r Jefferson . He has the pleasure to send him the Edinburg review which M r Jefferson expressd a desire to peruse. J M. has also the pleasure to send to M r Jefferson a
It has been intimated to me by unquestionable authority, that a visit by you to Col: Walker would at this time be consider’d by him, an act of great kindness, & be received with much sensibility. You know the wretched condition in which he is, tortur’d by an incurable disease, which must soon take him from this scene. The idea was suggested to me before I went to Richmond , but it did not...
I do not know what particular fact or circumstance can have given rise to the apprehension lately intimated to you by our friend, which you have been so good as to notice in yours. I will state, the what has occurr’d, between the respectable character alluded to, & me, since you were here, to enable you to judge how far there is just foundation for it. The day before I had intended to set out...
A M r Easterley who reminds me of a conversation with him in London some years past, has requested me to make known to you a project of his for converting our tob o & corn stalks , to a purpose of great publick utility, as well as private emolument, and likewise to introduce to you M r Burroughs his agent. I have thought that I could not better promote his object than by enclosing his letter...
I called the day after the rec t of your letter on m r Jefferson and made the offer of y r services to him in the S ui t of M r Livingston in the case of the Bat ture. I saw no objection to y r
I wished to obtain an interview with Bizet before I answer’d your favor of the 16th., that I might communicate to you something decisive relative to its object. Owing to his engagments at some distance, and to an injury which he lately received in blowing a rock, I could not see him till today, when I explaind fully your wishes respecting his services. He seemed to be much gratified at the...
I arrived here last night indisposed and must return in the stage to morrow or should have the pleasure to call on you. It was necessary that I should be present at the transfer of my property from one overseer to another, for which purpose I obtained leave of absence for a few days. M r Ritchie informed M r Coles that an anonymous communication had been sent him, stating that you had had a...
I have the pleasure to return you your correspondence with the directors of the Rivanna company which I lately rec d from you. I had submitted it to the perusal of a few friends only, in confidence, and had determin’d for the present, at least, not to publish it, from a fear that the publication might lead to some unpleasant discussion. you will have seen by the news papers that, I have been...
Your letter of the 20th. instant reached me yesterday morning. The subject which it presents to my view is highly interesting, and has received all the consideration which so short a time has enabled me to bestow on it. My wish to give you an early answer, in complyance with your request, has induc’d me to use all the dispatch which the delicacy & importance of the subject would permit. The...
I have received your letter of the 26th instant. Its contents are very satisfactory to me. The just principles on which you have invited me into the department of State, have removed every difficulty which had occurr’d to me, to the measure. They afford also a strong ground for hope, that the joint counsels & labours of those who are thus associated in the government, will promote the best...
An unexpected change has taken place in my situation since I had last the pleasure to see you. an invitation from the President to enter into the department of State will take me to Washington . Having accepted the office, I set out to morrow in the stage to commence its duties. this appointment subjected me, in the first intimation, to great concern, from a doubt of the propriety of resigning...
The minister of Russia , Count Pahlen & his brother , having intimated their intention to make you a visit at Monticello , I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction. The publick character of these respectable foreigners, would, I well know, secure them your kind reception, & friendly attention, but you will be gratified to know that they have high claims from personal merit. RC (...
I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 25. ulto. in which you are so good as to express a wish for my success in the discharge of the duties of the important & difficult office, to which I have been lately appointed by the President. For this obliging communication I beg you to accept my sincere acknowledgment. Permit me to reciprocate this friendly sentiment in your favor, & to...
M r Dortic mentioned in your favor of the 23 d ult o was furnishd with a passport, and a packet of newspapers was sent to the Collector at New York to be forwarded by him, which it is presumed he will receive. It happend that there was no dispatch prepard at the time for our chargé des aff rs
I arrived here late yesterday eving. having taken Richmond in my route. I had the great satisfaction to find Mrs. Monroe & our youngest daughter in better health than I had anticipated, as I had to find Mr Hay & our eldest. The early hour at which the post rider has called renders it impossible for me to say any thing on publick affrs. by this opportunity. I shall immediately turn my attention...
The incapacity for business produc’d by so long an application to it at Washington, has been increasd since my return home by a fall from my horse, being taken off by a limb of a tree under which he passed. My head, & left shoulder were bruis’d, & my leg cut a little by the stirrup, but I have almost recover’d from these injuries. I have walk’d about to day, & expect to be able to ride...
Mr Gales’s notice of the publication in the Aurora relative to Mr Foster was precisely what it ought to have been. It was undoubtedly proper to prevent such a statment going to the nation as a fact, & the mode of contradicting, being without a compromitment of the govt., the true one. I will endeavor to be with you in the course of the ensuing week. I expect to be able to wear my boot in that...
Some very interesting domestick concerns which could not well be postponed, seconded by the state of the wound on my leg, prevented my having the pleasure of waiting on you in the last week, but I shall be with you to morrow if no accident presents an obstacle to it. I shall bring all the papers with me which it will be necessary to submit to your view at this time. Indeed many things have...
The dispatches from France & England have kept me constantly occupied since their receit yesterday. A note to Gales shall be sent by the next mail. I now send a project of an answer to Mr Serrurier’s former letter, which you will dispose of as you find proper. I shall send one by the next mail, on the subject of his last letter, relating to the late proceeding in Phila. I have just recd. a...
Permit me to submit to your consideration a subject of peculiar delicacy. It is to suggest a doubt of the propriety of your making a visit at this time to this neighbourhood. You will be satisfied that I do suggest it from an attachment to your fame & that of your administration. If you come up, it being just before the meeting of Congress, it will be concluded, & probably so represented in...
I have had the Honor to receive your Letter of the 28th ult. covering one to your Son the American Minister at St Petersburg. I fear it will be too late for the “Hornet” sloop of war: but I have had it put under cover to Mr Barlow and sent to the Collector of the Customs at Newyork, requesting him to forward it by the first safe conveyance With great Respect / I have the Honor to be / Madam /...
A circumstance has occurr’d with which it may be useful for you to be made acquainted , with, merely to put you on your guard. you have doubtless seen a letter publish’d in the gazettes, which is imputed to Gen l Wilkinson & said to be written from this place in 1803. to Mr Power at N. Orleans , requesting him to use the
The Secretary of State to whom was referred the Resolution of the Senate requesting information on certain points respecting the trade of the United States to France, has the honor to report to the President that he has examined the files of this Department, and found no precise information on the subject of the said Resolution, which has not been heretofore communicated to Congress. That in...
This letter represents the cases of the Catharine & Julian, as proofs that the Berlin & Merlin [ sic ] Decrees were in force, and repeats its call for the instrument of revocation. With respect to this repetition of this call, I refer to the superabundant explanations already given on that subject, remarking here only that whilst F. does not profess to have revoked such part of her decrees, as...
The President will communicate to day to the Congress , the discovery which has been lately made to the government, of an attempt of the British gov t , thro’ the gov r gen l of Canada [or at least by him, with the subsequent approbation of that gov t
I recd. the enclosed on my return home. Be so good as read it, & return it by the bearer. I am convinc’d that it would be impolitick to raise difficulties at this time. I expect to see Ct. Crillon in a few minutes, having written to him to call. RC and enclosure ( DLC : John Henry Papers). Undated; date assigned here on the basis of the enclosure (see n. 1). Monroe’s enclosure was very likely...
The Secretary of State to whom was referred the Resolution of the Senate of the 4th. March last, has the honor to report, that the enclosed papers marked A. B & C contain all the information in this Department “relative to captures made by the Belligerants since the 1st. day of May 1811, of Vessels of the United States bound to or from the Baltic or with⟨in⟩ that Sea.” All which is...
An accident lately occurr’d which has given me great concern. The inclosed letter was received, with many others, several from your son at St Petersburg, & laid before me in the dept. of State. I opend it, without looking at the Superscription. On reading a line or two, I perceived the error I had committed, & searching for the address found the envelopes of two letters, one addressed to you,...
We arrived here on sunday last, & had the good fortune to meet Mr Hay & our daughter on their way to the springs. Mrs. Monroe had intended to accompany them there, but will remain here, with the younger part, being not far from indisposition, & too much fatigued to pursue the journey. We took the Dumfries route, & breakfastd at Lansdowne’s, the worst house we ever saw. The upper route by...
It was our intention to have passed a day with you & your family while I was in the county, but many interesting concerns and duties which require my constant attention will unavoidably prevent it. The arrangments which I have to make with my brothers family who arriv’d yesterday, will also take some portion of the short term allotted to my private affairs while here. As soon as our grandchild...