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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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The Sudden departure of Mr. Coles Has Left me But the Time to Come to town, take Leave of Him, And aknowledge Your kind Letter Just Now Received By Mr. Gelston. With Affectionate Gratitude I See that No pressure of Business Can Make You forgetful of the private Concerns of Your friend. Be pleased to present Also My Best Thanks to Mr. Gallatin. You Will Have Been Much Surprised to Hear the...
While I was indulging the Hope to See M r Coles at La Grange , to possess Him Some days in our family, to go with Him to Aulnay where M r et M de de tessé , expected the pleasure to Receive Him, I Have Been Yesterday informed of His Sudden departure—I immediately Came to town, But am much Vexed at My disappointment—The impression M r Coles Has made Upon me Makes me Heartily Regret Not to Have...
I fortunately Happened to Be at Aulnay , m de de tessé ’s Seat near paris, when a Messenger from America is Arrived—He is Sent Back immediately— I Hasten to write a few lines But do Not Lament this Sudden departure as I did that of m r Coles —He Had promised to Spend Some time at La Grange — I Had of Course Ajourned Every thing I wanted to Say and to Hear Respecting You, myself, public, and...
I Wish Gnl. Armstrong May before the departure of the Vessel Know Something More of the Late Austrian peace than the principal Ministers of the Emperor Knew of it Last Evening. They Have Been informed With the public that a treaty Has Been Signed. They are to day Summoned to fontainebleau. The Rest is Mere Conjecture which Cannot fail to be Soon Ascertained. Yet the General form of the...
I wish I might make use of the present Opportunity to tell You the Conditions of the peace Lately made with Austria —But Last Evening, the first members of Government knew no more of it than myself— I am Returning to La Grange —the Emperor is Expected this day at fontainebleau , and if the Vessel is Somewhat detained, G al Armstrong will Be able to write the particulars of the treaty. inclosed...
I Have Been for a Long time in daily and disappointed Expectations of a Letter from You, Nor do I know when I may obtain the Comfort of Your Correspondence—in the Mean while Much Havock Has Been Made in Europe — I don’t Speack of the British Expedition Under Lord Chatam —it is But justice to Say that, whatever Be their intention, they did as Litle Harm as possible Considering their Numbers and...
Compte rendu Sur la fortune du G al Lafayette a differentes epoques de sa vie Les trois premieres époques dont nous allons faire mention Sont litteralement copiées d’un Etat donné par M. Gratepain Morizot Ancien Avocat au Parlement de Paris et actuellement membre du Corps Legislatif; il fut chargé des affaires du G al Lafayette jusqu’en 1792. et obligé d’en rendre un compte rigoureux à la...
The Opportunity of an American frigate would at all times Have Been precious—it is still more So untill the Absurd Crime of water and Land piracies on the Neutrals is Renounced By Both Belligerents— I am in Hopes of a favorable Change. But as it must Be pretty well Ascertained Before the John Adams Sails I Refer You to What G al Armstrong will on the Last day Communicate. Amidst the Joint...
I Have Received By the John Adams Your kind Letter of the 4h december and Wish it Was in My power to Announce a Happy Change of European Measures. The frigate Has Not Yet Been Sent Back from England. Mr. de Champagny’s Note, promised Several Weeks Ago is still Expected—and Altho’ the Motive for delay, that the Emperor is taken Up With Matrimonial preparations, Appears frivolous, it is...
The John Adams is Not Yet Returned from England — it is probable m r pinkney waïts for Some Conclusion or Answer to Be Communicated by Her— I wish it May be the Case with G al Armstrong provided He Has Good News to Send—a Communication Had Been Announced to Him by M r de Champagny Which Has Not Yet taken place—
The John Adams By Whom I Have Received Your Kind Letter of the 4h december is Not Yet Returned from England. I Heartily Wish She May Carry Such Arrangements as Will Have Settled the differences With one Belligerent and Must Enable Gnl. Armstrong to Call Upon the declarations Made By the other. There is for me Every Motive to Wish this tardive Recourse to Honest and Sound policy Had first taken...
The Letters intended for the John Adams Are Gone an other Way. I Will not However Miss the Opportunity of the frigate. It is probable, after she is Arrived from England, Gnl. Armstrong Will Have to detain Her a few days, and By that time More May be Said on the Situation of American Affairs With Respect to Both Belligerents. My feelings and Wishes You Well Know. What information May Be...
I Have Had Lately, Notwistanding the Strangeness of the times, Good Opportunities to write to You— Nor do I think this Letter is the only one I Shall Send By the John Adams — But Before I Leave paris , where I Have Been detained By Very disagreable pecuniary troubles, I must Lodge with General Armstrong a third Copy of My long dissertation on my private affairs—a memorial Still Longer Has...
I Leave it With General Armstrong to inform You of the Happy Repeal of the two Milan and Berlin decrees—a determination Which Gives me Great pleasure and Great Hopes. I don’t See How the British Cabinet Can Avoid imitating the Example. That it Has Been Given By france Greatly Adds to My Satisfaction. While I was Lamenting to find Nothing for me in the Government dispatches Brought By the Flash...
Whatever Be the Situation of my private Concerns, the first Expressions of My Letter, and the first feelings of My Heart will Be Consecrated to the Happy Repeal of the Milan and Berlin decrees— it Behoves G al Armstrong on Every Account to Announce this important turn in His Negociation. But I Rejoice in the Opportunities to Congratulate it with You—it Seems Great Britain Cannot now dispence...
Your Letters Sent By Mr. david parish are the Last I Have Received. He Has kept the patents to deliver them Himself at the end of this Month. Three Vessels Have Since Arrived With Government dispatches. They Contained Nothing for me So that I am without An Answer to my Long triplicates By the San Sebastian Ship, By Count palhen, and by Captain Fenwick. A Letter from this Last, Very Carefully...
This Letter will Be Carried by G al Armstrong which makes it Superfluous for me to Give political intelligences— You will Have Heard of the Repeal of the milan and Berlin decrees to take place the 1 st November —there Have Since Been Some Communications more Secret, Some of them verbal, from which we may Hope for a Restoration of the Confiscated property, short of the Enormous duties, which...
I Have Had Lately the pleasure to Write By Gnl. Armstrong, But Cannot let the Homer depart Without Repeating a tender of My Grateful friendship. My Last did inform You that I Had Received Your kind Letters 18h and 19h May, But that No Answer to My Long triplicate By the John Adams Had Come to Hand. I Have Since Got the Nine patents delivered By Mr. parish Himself. The Homer Brought Me a Very...
I am Sure You Have Had the Goodness to Answer My Long triplicate the Last of Which Went By the John Adams. Several Subsequent Letters Have Been Sent By me. The last ones I Had from You are dated May the 18h and 19h. It is a Comfort to me to think that You and our friend Mr. Jefferson Have Received Notes Which do in a Measure Account for My pecuniary Situation and alleviate the Blame that one...
I Have not, Since You are Returned to private life, Received one Line from You— no Answer to My Voluminous dispatches By a S t Sebastien Ship, Count palhen , and the John Adams Has Ever Reached me—Several Government Letters Have Since arrived—I Have Several times writen to You—This Silence of Yours, my Excellent friend, is to me a Great disappointment. M r Russel will Relate the State of...
It is to me a particular Gratification, in Remembrance of old times, and in Justice to a Very Respectable Gentleman, to Recommend the Concerns of M. de Rayneval. He Has Been the first European diplomate Whose Negociations Have Met American independance, and None of them Has Been, in personal Exertions, More zealous and Useful. These Considerations Join With the Very Great Regard due to His...
I Gratefully thank You for Your Letter Novr the 1st., and for the incessant Attention You are pleased to give, Amidst Your public Avocations, to My private Concerns. It is a Misfortune Attached to the Vicissitudes of My Life that the Munificence of Congress and the Exertions of My friends, intended to Make me Rich again, Must Be Employed to prevent My Being Utterly Ruined. But Here also I find...
I Hope You Have Received my Letter of the 16 h Novem ber Complaining of Your silence—far I am from withdrawing the Complaint—Not one Line of Answer from You, Since You are at Monticelo , Has Reached me—I was Anxious to Hear Every particulars Relative to Your Retirement—the minute detaïls I Had presumed to pour upon You, with Respect to my private Concerns, needed to Be Countenanced By Your...
Altho’ my Letters to you Have for a very Long time Remained unanswered, I Cannot let madame de puzy Go to America without these lines from me—Not that she is in Need of a Recommendation to the friend upon whose Sentiments for Herself and Her parents she and Her children are chiefly to depend. she abandons the prospects to which the Distinguished Services of Her Husband , not only in our times,...
It is a Good fortune for me to Arrive from La Grange in time to improve the Opportunity that is just Going. I ardently Wish the frigate May Soon follow the Flash With Satisfactory Accounts. Hitherto the Emperor Has been on His travels So that Mr. Barlow Could Not be presented before last Sunday. His personal Reception Has been the Most Agreable His friends and the friends to His business Might...
The Arrival of the Constitution frigate Has Blessed me with a very welcome Compensation for your Long Silence— I Have first Enjoy’d the kind Letters directed to me, then took a share in those to mde de tessé and to my friends Humboldt and tracy —they Have Given me So much to think and to Say that I feel the insufficiency of Epistolary Correspondance , and more than Ever the Need of personal...
27 December 1811, La Grange. Discusses Franco-American relations and introduces Mr. de Correa. “When I have left town Some days ago symptoms seemed to promise a Better Answer to Mr. Barlow’s note than had been for a long while obtained by An American Minister—I hope he is By this time coralled to send of the frigate, and will not Any Longer Delay these few lines depending upon him to Give you...
The Arrival of the Wasp Has Brought to me no letters from You. The Sudden departure of the Hornet which it Had been Necessary to keep Untill an other Conveyance was Secured Leaves me but little time to write. Mr. Barlow Will fully Acquaint You with the General State of politics and the present progress of His Exertions. I shall therefore Content myself With a few lines Respecting my personal...
While I Have been obliged By my pecuniary Circumstances to part With four More patents of my Lands Near pointe Coupee it is a Comfort to me to Have put them in the Hands of Sir John Coghill. He Has a proper Sense of the Advantages to be found in a Connection with the United states and a Sincere desire to Contribute to their Wellfare as a good Louisiana proprietor. His Means and His plans...
The Hornet is Going to Sail. By Her You Will Receive dispatches Which Make it Unnecessary for me to add farther informations. I the more Lament the Appearant dispositions of the british Ministry With Respect to the orders in Council as I More fervently Wish the U. S. May not be involved in a War. Our friend Mr. Barlow tells you the present state of His Negociations. I shall therefore Confine...
I find the dispatches By the Hornet are Just Going and altho’ I mean to write more fully By the Return of the wasp I Hastily Seize the Opportunity to let you know that my family and myself, mde de tessé , who Has Been ill, mr de tessé , m. de mun and m r de tracy are now all well—your Correspondance with washington will inform you of the European news.—Great Continental preparations are moving...
I Cannot Lament the Sudden departure of the wasp Since I am informed it is owing to Some Better progress from this Quarter—the particulars I do Not know, Having Had no Late Opportunity of a Confidential Communication with Our friend mr Barlow . the Negociation with mr perceval Has taken a shorter turn than was Expected—I Hope His power May Be inherited By one Better disposed in favor of the...
Here is, my dear friend, the Anniversary of that Great day on which Both the deed and the Expression were worthy of Each other—This double Rememberance in your Quiete Retirements is Happily Refreshed By the Extension of independance to all America —an event which, altho’ we Have Had the pleasure to foresee and the Good fortune to prepare it, we should not, Had it not Been for the Ambition of...
The Repeal of the orders in Council Has Been Announced to us. I Rejoice at the Success of Your Spirited Measures, and Am Not Less Happy in the Maintenance of peace. Our friend and worthy Minister will tell you How matters are Going in Europe. My Letters of Yesterday Say that Hostilities are begun on the Niemen . This one Goes with the public dispatches. I shall therefore Confine myself to...
Our friend M. Barlow has communicated to me the article of your Letter relative to my affairs. So far I am from Wondering at a delay of the decision of Congress on the report of their Commissioners, That I feel much obliged to you to have mentionned it, under the actual pressure of affairs, in your Last dispatch. It is however of Great importance to me that the Business of those two patents be...
While You are Honorably Engaged in patriotic Concerns for which my feelings Have not Ceased, during Six and thirty Years, to be truly American, I don’t Like to intrude on Your time With observations Relative to My private affairs. Yet the Correspondance is Now So Uncertain that I will not miss a Good opportunity to trouble you with a few Selfish Lines. I am much pleased to preface them with...
The Arrival of Mr. Crawford and two Letters from our friend Monroe and david parish Have informed me that You Were in Good Health. I Expect the pleasure of a letter from You along With the patents which You Have Been pleased to Entrust to Mm Gallatin and Bayard. They Will probably find Means to Convey them before the End of the Year. A Communication I Meant to Open through one of the...
This Letter will Be delivered By M r Jullien a Citizen distinguished By His Litterary and political knowledge as well as By His patriotic Sentiments. He Has Been for a Long time employ’d in the Commissariat and offices of the military department and Has particularly Applied His Studies to the Line of education. Being desirous to visit the U. S. , altho’ He is not on the lists of proscription,...
J’ai eu la bonne idée de me prévaloir des droits que me donnent mes Sentiments pour vous, votre amour du bien public, et votre affection pour la gloire de l’Empereur Alexandre ; ce Secret sera d’autant mieux gardé que je connais votre répugnance à vous mêler d’affaires etrangères à votre païs. Voici une note que j’ai demandée à M r Crawford digne Ministre des Etats Unis. Il s’est adressé à M r...
Your Letters to me Nov. 30 and to our Beloved Mde de tessé decemb. 8 h are the Last I Have Received—She Has Not lived to enjoy this token of your Rememberance— m. de tessé who Had Been declining Rapidly was the first of the two for whom we Had to mourn—she assisted Him to the Last Hour—She Regretted Him with the feelings of lively affection and old Habits—Her delicate frame Could not Bear Such...
I Had flattered myself with the Expectation to See Mr. Tod in our Rural Retirements before He left This Country. But Hearing He is to Set of from paris to morrow I Hasten these lines to You, Refering Myself for European intelligence to the official dispatches and verbal accounts which you are going to Receive. Here is However a letter of mine to our friend Jefferson which being unsealed I...
Mr. Masson a Citizen of the U.S. whose Relations in france are particularly known to me, and who Has Rendered Services on the West point Establishment, informs me that He Has the Honor to Apply to You as a Candidate for Consular Employment in Some port of france. His merits in the military line you know better than I Could state them but am inclined to think they give Him a title to the...
The glorious termination of the war and the Ratification of the peace are Events which on Every public and personal accounts Have afforded me the Highest Satisfaction. Had Great Britain persisted in the project to Bend Her Whole force against the people of the U.S. abandonned as they Were By all the powers of Europe, I Would not Have doubted the final Success of American Bravery and...
The Name of Regnauld de St. Jean d’Angely a member of the Constituent assembly, of our late House of Representatives, and in the interval Between those two great Epochas, an Eminent Actor on the administrative Stage of france, is, no doubt, well known to You. His Uncommon talents Had placed him Very high in the imperial affairs and Have probably Contributed to the choice made of him to be...
I do not know whether the Bearer of these Lines Has Had the Honour of Your Acquaintance while you were Visiting His family or friends—But I am Sure He Will Meet a kind Welcome at Monticelo and Shall only add the Expression of my Constant and Respectful affection RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 27 Oct. 1817 and so recorded in SJL ; with notation by TJ adjacent to endorsement: “(by...
A Long while Has Elapsed Since I Had the pleasure to Hear from you—I might Say a Century Was I to Reckon upon the Succession of Revolutions and dynasties—But as Royal and imperial Cycles are to you and me very Secondary objects, I only mean the true time during which I Have Been deprived of your Correspondance In your Letters of Last year, anterior to the first Abdication of Bonaparte , you...
Your kind Letter by Major Swett Has afforded me the Highest pleasure—it Will Be Answered By a more direct opportunity than the Introductory lines which I beg leave to put into the Hands of Mr Poussin—this Young Scholar of the french Architectural Academy is Recommended to me By an eminent professor, my particular friend—Mr Poussin, Son to a Late distinguished artist, possesses T Himself...
Amidst the services, I would be happy to render to the United States I set in the first rank an acquisition so precious, that America is the only Country upon earth which I cannot grieve to see benefitted by the loss of France. Genl. Bernard whom the Polytechnic School glories to have possessed, has so eminently distinguished himself in the Corps of Engineers, namely on the fortification of...
The Bearer of these Lines is M r Lakanal Member of the french institut , officer of the University and inspector General of the New Metrical System who abandons those functions and a Handsome treatment to Become a Settler in the State of Kentucky . He Has for Several years been in the Representative Assemblies of france , and is Going to Seeck in the U.S. Liberty, Security, and Happiness. I...
I Have Been for a Long While Anxiously Expecting Answers to Several Letters of Mine Which I principaly Atribute to the distance from Monticelo to the Sea port places where opportunities are to Be found— But as the departure of M r Gallatin Cannot fail to Be known to You I Hope He May Be the Bearer of Your dispatches. the Situation of Europe is too Comprehensive, the Events of Last Year Have...