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On recieving your letter of the 7 h instant , I ascertained that William Armstead had been appointed the Principal Assessor, for the 19 th Collection District of Virginia , with the consent of the Senate , on the 23 d of December 1813; and that he had signified his acceptance of the office, on the 7 th of February following. If, under these circumstances, it is your wish, that any measure...
I have the honor to inform you, that, under the authority of an Act of Congress , I am ready to issue Treasury Notes, for the Sum of Twenty three thousand, nine hundred, and fifty dollars, in your favor: on account of the purchase of your Library, for the use of the Government. Be so good as to state, to whom the Notes shall be made payable, at what place, and of what denominations, the issues...
¶ From Alexander J. Dallas. Letter not found. 23 February 1815. Described in Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 1401 (1927), item 65, as an autograph letter, signed, “In reference to appointing Mr. Ingersoll as District Attorney.”
Mr. Dallas respectfully states to the President, that Mr. John T. Irving, a brother of the member of Congress, has been strongly recommended to succeed Mr. Sanford, in the office of District Attorney. His introduction to Mr. D. is from Judge VanNess, and Genr. VanNess. His legal talents are highly rated; but there are persons now here, who could put that point beyond doubt. RC ( DNA : RG 59,...
Conversing with Mr. Monroe and Mr. Crowninshield, we agreed that some attention should be paid to our gallant officers, when vacancies in civil stations occurred. I have just suggested to Mr. Monroe that it would be well to offer General Brown the rank in the army and the vacant naval office in New York at the same time. If he declines the latter, then to offer it to General Wilkinson as a...
After a very unpleasant excursion as far as New York, I returned to Washington on Thursday evening. It is some consolation, however, that I have been able to put all my objects of business in a good train; and I shall be much mistaken, if the machinery of the Treasury be not restored to its regular movements, with the aid of the Banks, in the course of two or three months. I inclose a copy of...
I inclose the draft of a letter to the General officers, on the execution of the Act of the 3d. of March 1815, with a copy of the Act. You will see by a Memorandum from Mr. Monroe, that he thinks the peace establishment is to be composed of 10,000 men, exclusive of Officers. Genl. Scott agrees in that opinion; and I shall be very glad to adopt it, with your approbation. I shall write to you...
To save time, I inclose the rough sketch of a second letter to the General Officers, giving a view of the effect of the Act of Congress on the preexisting military code. You will perceive that it corresponds with the view which Mr. Monroe had taken of the subject. It seems indispensable that the Adjutant General’s Office should be retained, to connect the War Department, by a proper link, with...
Genl. Brown has not yet arrived; but the other Generals have been at work, as pioniers, to prepare the way for an immediate report, as soon as he appears. I am assured, that the selection will be impartial, and such as must command the approbation of the Army, and the confidence of the nation. I do not fail, however, to attend to the course pursued in making it. Indeed, such is the jealousy...
The result of the conference of the Heads of Department on Genl. Jackson’s case, will be seen in the inclosed draft of a letter to the General, which is submitted to your consideration. Be so good as to return it with your instructions to alter it, or to send it in its present shape. There is no other copy of the letter. The fact of the release of Judge Hall and Mr. Dick is stated in a second...
The inclosed letter has just been received from Genl. Jackson. Every step will be taken to secure the payment of his Troops. The British Officer commanding at Castine, declines surrendering the post until he receives orders from Halifax; and the Commander at Fort Niagara declines surrendering until he receives orders from General Drummond. Both say, however, that they expect the orders will be...
I have the honor to inclose to you a statement, specifying the appropriations for the expenditures in this department, in the years 1814 and 1815, including the balances of appropriations on the 31st. of December, 1813: the amount actually expended from the 1st. of January, 1814, to the 10th. of March, 1815; the unexpended amount of the appropriations; and the amount for which warrants have...
We have received Genl. Macomb’s acceptance of his appointment to continue in the Army; but we have not heard from him, nor from Genl. Brown, as to the time of their coming to Washington. The City fills fast with Officers of all ranks; and it is very desireable to terminate their solicitudes. As soon as your answer to my letters, relative to the organization, are received, I will set Genl Scott...
I am obliged to trouble you again on Mr. Lufborough’s business. He has mistaken my expression, which was, “that if the claim is not legal, still it appears to me to be equitable.” However, recollecting your view of the subject, I do not wish to give a formal decision, without your sanction; and I will thank you to say, whether I shall leave it as it stands, or submit it to the Comptroller on...
I have received your letters of the 14: and 16t instant. It is evident, from the nearer view, which I have been able to take of military men, that your first selection of General Officers is as good as can be made. They are besides, the six General Officers, who have been distinguished by the thanks of Congress. General Ripley still harps upon the Court of Inquiry, and I have not succeeded in...
I have the pleasure to say, that the business respecting Genl. Ripley is arranged; and I hope it will be to your satisfaction. I inclose copies of the letters, which have passed between us. The selection of General Officers being compleat, I will announce it; and if Genl. Brown arrives today, or tomorrow, I think the general plan of organization may be sent for your consideration on Monday....
General Brown will probably be here tonight; and I think the organization of the Corps, and selection of Officers, may be compleated on Wednesday. Be so good as to put the inclosed into any shape, that will answer the purpose intended. I think it of some importance, that the feelings of the deranged Officers should be soothed; but it would be impolitic, and, indeed, impracticable to use any...
General Brown has joined the Board; and I have the pleasure to inform you that, so far, everything has been transacted with perfect harmony and unanimity. The selections are of a high and distinguished character, as far as I can judge; and I am assured that the army will itself acknowledge their justness. The field officers at present on the list are these, for infantry and riflemen: Colonels....
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, dated the 18: instant , and to inform you, that measures were im me diately taken to comply with your request. Your draft in favor of M r Barnes has been paid. M r Short has been informed, that the draft in his favor will be paid, as soon as it is presented here. The Treasury Notes, to be paid on your own account, have been ordered to...
The Board of Officers still continue industriously at work; but I have no result yet. Perhaps, I shall be able to communicate a plan of organization by Monday’s Mail. The inclosd letter, and Extra newspaper, were received by me in the Mail of yesterday. The letter is certainly written by Mr. T. Biddle; and I presume Mr Bache threw it into the Mail, after the Bag had been locked; which accounts...
I inclose reccommendations for granting Capt Romayne the vacant appointment of Assistant Inspector General. The appointment will be merely nominal, to carry the rank, as the office will be abolished when the Army shall be discharged. The reasons for soliciting it, however, are stated in the reccommendations; and I will thank you to favor me with your decision on the subject. Capt. Romayne has...
The restoration of Bonaparte is confirmed, as all the newspapers will tell you. The effect upon Europe will be general and important; but it is difficult to form a satisfactory conjecture of the result. The abdication included both France and Italy, will both Crowns be resumed? Bonaparte consented to the restoration of Ferdinand, will he retract, or will he support, that incorrigible tyrant?...
I inclose General Brown’s letter for your perusal. It is possible, that I may be able to send the Report of the Board of Officers by this day’s mail; but, at all events, it will be sent tomorrow. It appears by an English newspaper, that our Commissioners were about to assemble in London, at the end of February; and that the negotiation of a Treaty of commerce was thought to be their object....
At the request of Col. Owings the inclosed letter is s[e]nt to you. His case has been well considered, and well decided. Major Taylor has been placed on the list. I am, Dr Sir, Yr. mo. obdt. RC ( CSmH ). Dallas enclosed a i May 1815 letter to him from Col. Thomas Deye Owings, Maj. Zachary Taylor, and Maj. William Bradford ( DNA : RG 107, LRRS , O-12:8; 5 pp.), protesting what they understood...
I now send to you a report of the Board of General Officers upon the organization of the peace establishment, and the selection of Officers; and, also, a report for a General Staff. The latter will certainly require legislative sanction, before it can be adopted to the whole extent. It seems to be indispensable, that an Officer performing the duties of Adjutant General, should be attached to...
I send a third Report of the Board of Officers, containing a plan, for establishing a Northern and Southern Division of the United States, to be subdivided into nine military Departments; for the distribution of the rank and file of the Army, to the Corps and Regiments of the peace organization; and for apportioning the Corps and Regiments to the two great Divisions. It is proper to note, that...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United States the following report: That in the month of November, in the year 1814, the British sloop Mary, Darling, master, with a cargo on board, sailing under convoy of his Britannic majesty’s sloop of war Pelter, on a voyage from Halifax to Castine, was captured within the district of Penobscot, by...
I send inclosed a report of the Board officers, respecting Surgeons, Judge Advocates, and Chaplains. The next report, probably the concluding one, will be upon Garrisons, Forts &c. As soon as they have closed the business referred to them, I propose, with your approbation, to write a letter of thanks to them, and to request that they will return to their respective commands, until further...
I send inclosed a report in the case of Mr. Eustaphieve, the Russian Consul at Boston. The doccuments are recited verbatim in the report, and, therefore, I do not trouble you with them. I preferred a recital, to a reference, that all who read the report, should distinctly understand the facts, without being forced to examine the evidence. It appears to me to be a most flagrant case. I submit...
I transmit to you the concluding Reports of the Board of Officers; and, I presume, that they will express a wish to be discharged, as soon as you have seen their plans. Upon the whole, they have furnished very good materials; and I will prepare from them a general report of the Department, for your consideration and sanction; which, when approved, will be the proper official document for...