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The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to submit to the President, a copy of his letter to the Auditor of the Treasury, respecting the settlement of Mr. Hassler’s accounts, which will require the President’s approbation. CSmH .
I have received your favor of the 4. instant; and shall alter the Circular on the currency, in the way which you suggest. The receipt of several additional reccommendations for the Loan Office in New-Hampshire, induces me to suspend an application for the Commission in favor of Mr. Plumer, until you have seen the doccuments now sent. I do not anticipate, however, a change in your instructions....
I send, for your consideration, Govr. Plumer’s recommendation of his Son, to succeed Mr. Gardner, whose resignation of the Loan oOffice in New-Hampshire, was forwarded a few days ago. Mr. Smith, the Marshal of New-York, is dead, and you will, I presume, be harrassed with applications for the Office. I am, Dr. Sir, most respectfully & faithfully, Yr. obed Serv. CSmH .
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to submit to the President of the United States, the inclosed report and estimate of the Collector of the port of Philadelphia, relative to the purchase of a site, and the erection of buildings, for a Custom-House in that City. CSmH .
¶ From Alexander J. Dallas. Letter not found. 23 February 1815. Described in Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 1401 (1927), item 65, as an autograph letter, signed, “In reference to appointing Mr. Ingersoll as District Attorney.”
I have just received your favor of the 15t. instant, and, conforming to it, I shall cease to act in the Treasury, after the dispatch of tomorrow’s mail. The kind expressions of your letter, make a deep and lasting impression. I shall resort to the testimonials of your approbation and confidence, for consolation, whenever the past reminds me of any Sacrafice to be lamented; or the future shall...
A Severe indisposition has confined me to my bed for three days. I am sufficiently recovered, however, to decide upon beginning my journey this afternoon, or tomorrow morning. I have left every thing here in order; and I shall continue, with great pleasure, to transact the business of the Department, until you are ready to relieve me. You will, of course, give me notice of a day, on which I am...
The Collectors Selection of a Site and buildings, for the New-York Custom House, is generally approved; and the price deemed moderate. The inclosed letter from Mr. Derbigny creates an apprehension, that the Subscription to the Bank has not been opened at New-Orleans. The Commissioners were named by the Louisiana members of Congress; and as Mr. Brown and Mr. Robertson are on the spot, I hope...
On my arrival at New-York, I was attacked with a fever; and although I saw Mr. Gallatin and Mr. Clay, I was not able to write to you: that they had, at last, reached the United States. I presume, however, that they have written to you themselves; and that by the hands of Mr. Cutts, you have received the commercial Treaty, with the correspondence relating to it. The Treaty does not contain any...
A convention of representatives from the Banks of New-York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore, decided yesterday, that they would recommend to their Constituents, the resumption of specie payments on the 1st. of July next. A Committee called upon me to communicate the decision. I remonstrated against so distant a day, and stated that there were two periods, designated by the measures of the...
An oppressive attention to the business of the court has prevented my making the inclosed draft earlier; and I send it now in a very rough state, rather than lose a mail for the purpose of copying it. I could not venture to fill the blank in the second page; but the figures will be supplied by the Register, upon a question: what will be the aggregate of the public funded debt after the...
At a meeting at the Department of State, Mr. Monroe brought under consideration the Algerine case, and the case of the Whaling vessels in the Pacific. He will communicate the result in both cases; but I find, upon an explanation, that only one of the Whaling vessels is known to have been seized by the Spaniards, though there are 24 at risque. The dispatch from Mr. Harris is an unpleasant one;...
I trouble you with a draft of the agreement with Mr. Hassler relative to the survey of the coast. The work is an important one, and must require both time and money to complete it. I am confident that Mr. Hassler is the only person equal in all respects to the undertaking, within the reach of the government. The circular to the banks is prepared for issuing, and the prospect of an accumulation...
The Bank Subscription is filled. The deficit of the general returns, 3,000,000. Dollars, was taken by Mr. Girard, in a single line, to the great disappointment of the Brokers and Speculators. I congratulate you upon this event. There is little doubt of the organization of the Bank being republican, and friendly to the Government. The Cumberland road presents new embarrassments; and I Shall...
Your instructions relative to Fort Harrison, and the reservation of the land in its neighborhood, have been carried into effect. I hope now to be able to put the business of the Cumberland road, as well as the business of the Survey of the coasts, into a course of execution, without troubling you again. The consultation on the Resolution of Congress, respecting the currency, will be attended...
The inclosed application from Mr. Hughes, appears to be within the rules, exempting the effects of Public Ministers, upon their return to the United States, from the payment of duties. If you approve, the proper instructions will be given to the Collector. My solicitude, respecting the conduct of the State Banks, the organization of the National Bank, and the disorder of the currency,...
Col. Lane Seems to think, that the Librarian has been too officious in making his communication to you; and agrees that there ought not to be a change in the situation of the Library, until Congress shall decide upon it. This is, also, the opinion of Mr. Crawford and Mr. Rush. We have met on Col. Jessup’s letter; and Mr. Crawford will communicate our general views upon the subject. The Colonel...
It appears that Dr. Flord returned to New Orleans on the 3d of July, and that the bank subscriptions were opened. The amount is not expected to exceed $300,000 at that place. The general deficit will probably be $3,000,000, but it will be immediately supplied by companies already formed. Mr. Girard alone will take $1,000,000, if he can obtain that sum. I am anxious to receive your sentiments...
POSTSCRIPT. The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to add that certain occurrences, happening since the foregoing report was presented, merit observation: 1st. The situation of the Public credit and resources at Boston, has enabled the Treasury to discharge the loan of 500,000 dollars, long due to the State Bank, in the following manner: By a draft for cash, amounting to $ 130,000 By a...
Mr. Jones promised to communicate to you a Statement of the Subscriptions to the Bank of the United States. The deficit will not be great, and will be immediately subscribed, at Philadelphia. Mr. Jones’s prospect brightens. He is opposed, however, by Major Butler, whose appointment produces all the inconveniences, that I apprehended. The Treasury Circular seems to be approved by all, but the...
Having considered the question, as to purchasing a Site for the Observatory, more attentively, I conclude that it would be deemed, probably, an extreme latitude of construction, to make an expensive purchase of lots, as an incident to the authority for a survey of the coast, which is a temporary work. The objection does not arise to occupying lots already belonging to the public; and which...
The inclosed Sketch will give you a general view of the finances. The item of floating debt is left open, until Mr. Nourse, the Register, returns, that the amount of Treasury Notes, absorbed by the payments for duties and taxes, may be precisely ascertained. It is very great; and may be estimated by the Statement, which reduces the outstanding Treasury Notes to Something like 6,000,000...
I find Mr. Jones so infirm in body and mind that I feel uneasy to be longer absent from Washington. I shall, therefore, return next week to finish my treasury report there. It will give you pleasure to learn that I am able to give notice for payment of the treasury notes due in New York as far down as the month of June, 1816. Indeed, everything but the currency will be in good order. The bank...
I inclose the Memorial of the Merchants of New-York, to which Mr. Irving’s letter (already communicated to you) referred. It appears to me, that the only proper mode of interfering for the relief of the Memorialists, would be to authorise the District Attorney to stay executions, after judgments had been entered, taking, if necessary, additional Security. To suspend writs, or to renew the...
If I had received your favor of the instant, at Washington, I should have been tempted to remain there, for the gratification of personal farewell. Indeed, I ran some risque, by undertaking the journey hither, the first day of my being able to leave my bed, for nearly a week. I always doubted Mr. Clay’s disposition to accept the War Department, although I have no doubt of his wish to be placed...
The Cumberland road.progresses than I expected...The report is that Mr. Shriver will be tempted to resign his charge for employment under a Company in Maryland. It will be difficult to supply his place, though his slow march has been censured. Col. Williams estimates his services at too high a price; and there are other reasons for confining his share in the work to a temporary engagement. I...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to submit the following Statement to the consideration of the President of the United States. Treasury Notes, which were issued under Acts passed prior to the Act of the 21. of February 1815, were payable at the expiration of a year from their respective dates, with interest at the rate of 5 2/ 5 per cent. per annum, at the Loan Offices,...
The Act of the 30. of April 1816 appropriates 250,000 Dollars for Custom-House establishments. It will, probably, be a sum sufficient for the five principal commercial Cities; but I have not received satisfactory information from any Collector, but the Collector of Boston, upon whose report I now transmit to you an official statement, which you will be so good as to return with your directions...
On the day of my departure from Washington, the Heads of Departments assembled at Mr. Monroe’s office, and considered all the subjects, which you had referred to them. Mr. Monroe will communicate the result to you; together with a statement of the measures suggested, in relation to Mr. Kusloff’s case. There is no business to trouble you with, from the Treasury; and there is neither foreign,...
When the report first reached me, that Mr. Sheldon was going to Europe, I felt some Solicitude, that he should not go, before the Treasurer’s accounts were stated ? and Settled; and I released him from all the other duties of the office, that he might attend exclusively, to that object. I certainly felt no objection, generally, to his departure, as his health really required Some relaxation...
I inclose Mr. Hassler’s letter, requesting a site for the Observatory. The reccommendation of the ground selected, is very strong; but it requires consideration, whether the authority is sufficient, for purchasing that portion of it, which does not belong to the public? The appropriation is adequate, regarding it as an incident to the servey of the coast. I have requested from Mr. Monroe and...
The inclosed report gives you the result of our consultation on the Resolution of the 29. of April 1816. I entertained a doubt, for a moment, upon the power of the Treasury to make a discrimination in the terms of paying different descriptions of public debt and duties. I am satisfied, however, upon reflection, that the arrangment is indispensable for the accommodation of the country; and as...
Upon reflection, I think it best to proceed with the Circular to the State Banks, and to issue the Notes, for the payment of the Treasury Notes, which are due in New-York. I ought not to anticipate a failure in the revenue, by the delinquency of the merchants; nor can I perceive any power in the Treasury Department to interfere for their relief. The case is not at all, like the case of a...
I have received, my dear Sir, your invaluable communication of the 3d. instant. It is not in my power to express the Sense, which I entertain of the notice taken of my services in the Treasury. For my own day, it will Serve as a Shield against the assaults of the envious, malicious, and inimical; and for the days of my Children, it will not be the least precious portion of their inheritance....
I have just received your favor of the 11t. inst. It has given me great pleasure; and in the course of two or three days, you will receive the note you request. If you should decide upon sending the Report of September last to Congress, I think it would be best to send it, in the shape of an explanatory Extract, relative to business, which was transacted before Mr. Crawford’s responsibility...
Preparing to Surrender the official trust, which you were pleased to confide to me in October 1814, I have the honor to present a general Sketch of the actual and prospective State of the finances. This Report, taken in connection with the Reports made to Congress upon other occasions, will clearly exhibit the principles, upon which the business of the Department has been transacted,...
I have received the inclosed letters from Genl. Jackson and General Gaines. The former does not appear to have received any of our letters; and the latter has only received the letter, inviting him to Washington, or his answers have miscarried. There is a remarkable coincidence between Genl. Gaine’s, reccommendatory list, and the selections made here; and Lieut. Spotts, who is strongly...
I can gather no news from the Officers of the Neptune worth communicating. Mr. Crawford has told you all that is important of our own affairs, and of the affairs of Europe when he left it. The newspapers will tell you, as soon as this letter can reach you, of the dreadful battle of the 15, 16, 17. & 18: of June. The carnage must have exceeded anything in the history of battles. The Duke of...
I send a third Report of the Board of Officers, containing a plan, for establishing a Northern and Southern Division of the United States, to be subdivided into nine military Departments; for the distribution of the rank and file of the Army, to the Corps and Regiments of the peace organization; and for apportioning the Corps and Regiments to the two great Divisions. It is proper to note, that...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the United States: That the appropriations for the subsistence, for the Quarter Masters Department, for Arsenals, Magazines &c, Maps and plans, forage of Rangers, and Camp Equippage of the Army of the united States for the years 1814 & 1815; are inadequate to the accomplishment of their objects; and that it has become...
I am anxious to make our Army arrangement satisfactory, without taking too great a latitude in the discretion left to the Executive. I am afraid Genl. Jackson will be mortified, if Major Butler and Major Hayne are not noticed in some part of our arrangement; and I think we can manage the matter safely, by allowing an Adjutant General (Major Butler) to be provisionally retained for the Division...
I have the honor to inclose to you a statement, specifying the appropriations for the expenditures in this department, in the years 1814 and 1815, including the balances of appropriations on the 31st. of December, 1813: the amount actually expended from the 1st. of January, 1814, to the 10th. of March, 1815; the unexpended amount of the appropriations; and the amount for which warrants have...
We have received Genl. Macomb’s acceptance of his appointment to continue in the Army; but we have not heard from him, nor from Genl. Brown, as to the time of their coming to Washington. The City fills fast with Officers of all ranks; and it is very desireable to terminate their solicitudes. As soon as your answer to my letters, relative to the organization, are received, I will set Genl Scott...
The inclosed paper gives, it is alledged, the sequel of the battle of the 18: of June, between Bonaparte and the Allies. The report, in the extent stated, is doubted here; but I think it probable, that Bonaparte’s repulse will produce something like a test of his popularity at Paris. I have written to Mr. Crawford, but no answer has been recieved. It may be, that he is on his way to visit you....
I had prepared a letter to Genl. Brown, respecting the surrender of the Fort at Michillimackinac, before I received your favor of the 24. instant. Every consideration presses that object upon our attention; and an early possession must be insisted on, by all means, except force. If the delay continues until Mr. Monroe’s return, you will, perhaps, think it right to address Mr. Baker on the...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to represent to the President of the United States, That he has received from the Mayor of the City of New-York, a letter dated the 3d. instant, to which the answer dated the 7: instant has been given, relative to the American Seamen, who have arrived in Cartels from England, and are exposed to great want, being destitute of pecuniary funds: And that...
The acting Secretary of War, has the honor to represent to the President of the united States: That the appropriations for the Salary of the Commissary General, and for the Militia of the united States, for the years 1814 & 1815, are inadequate to the accomplishment of their objects, and that it has become necessary for the public Service that a portion of the monies appropriated for other...
The acting Secretary of War has the honor to represent to the President of the united States: That the appropriations for the pay, the Subsistence and the Quarter Masters Department, of the army of the united States for the years 1814 & 1815, are inadequate to the accomplishment of their objects; and that it has become necessary for the public Service, that a portion of the monies appropriated...
The Board of Officers still continue industriously at work; but I have no result yet. Perhaps, I shall be able to communicate a plan of organization by Monday’s Mail. The inclosd letter, and Extra newspaper, were received by me in the Mail of yesterday. The letter is certainly written by Mr. T. Biddle; and I presume Mr Bache threw it into the Mail, after the Bag had been locked; which accounts...
I have received your letters of the 14: and 16t instant. It is evident, from the nearer view, which I have been able to take of military men, that your first selection of General Officers is as good as can be made. They are besides, the six General Officers, who have been distinguished by the thanks of Congress. General Ripley still harps upon the Court of Inquiry, and I have not succeeded in...