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On recieving your letter of the 7 h instant , I ascertained that William Armstead had been appointed the Principal Assessor, for the 19 th Collection District of Virginia , with the consent of the Senate , on the 23 d of December 1813; and that he had signified his acceptance of the office, on the 7 th of February following. If, under these circumstances, it is your wish, that any measure...
I have the honor to inform you, that, under the authority of an Act of Congress , I am ready to issue Treasury Notes, for the Sum of Twenty three thousand, nine hundred, and fifty dollars, in your favor: on account of the purchase of your Library, for the use of the Government. Be so good as to state, to whom the Notes shall be made payable, at what place, and of what denominations, the issues...
¶ From Alexander J. Dallas. Letter not found. 23 February 1815. Described in Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 1401 (1927), item 65, as an autograph letter, signed, “In reference to appointing Mr. Ingersoll as District Attorney.”
Mr. Dallas respectfully states to the President, that Mr. John T. Irving, a brother of the member of Congress, has been strongly recommended to succeed Mr. Sanford, in the office of District Attorney. His introduction to Mr. D. is from Judge VanNess, and Genr. VanNess. His legal talents are highly rated; but there are persons now here, who could put that point beyond doubt. RC ( DNA : RG 59,...
Conversing with Mr. Monroe and Mr. Crowninshield, we agreed that some attention should be paid to our gallant officers, when vacancies in civil stations occurred. I have just suggested to Mr. Monroe that it would be well to offer General Brown the rank in the army and the vacant naval office in New York at the same time. If he declines the latter, then to offer it to General Wilkinson as a...
After a very unpleasant excursion as far as New York, I returned to Washington on Thursday evening. It is some consolation, however, that I have been able to put all my objects of business in a good train; and I shall be much mistaken, if the machinery of the Treasury be not restored to its regular movements, with the aid of the Banks, in the course of two or three months. I inclose a copy of...
I inclose the draft of a letter to the General officers, on the execution of the Act of the 3d. of March 1815, with a copy of the Act. You will see by a Memorandum from Mr. Monroe, that he thinks the peace establishment is to be composed of 10,000 men, exclusive of Officers. Genl. Scott agrees in that opinion; and I shall be very glad to adopt it, with your approbation. I shall write to you...
To save time, I inclose the rough sketch of a second letter to the General Officers, giving a view of the effect of the Act of Congress on the preexisting military code. You will perceive that it corresponds with the view which Mr. Monroe had taken of the subject. It seems indispensable that the Adjutant General’s Office should be retained, to connect the War Department, by a proper link, with...
Genl. Brown has not yet arrived; but the other Generals have been at work, as pioniers, to prepare the way for an immediate report, as soon as he appears. I am assured, that the selection will be impartial, and such as must command the approbation of the Army, and the confidence of the nation. I do not fail, however, to attend to the course pursued in making it. Indeed, such is the jealousy...
The result of the conference of the Heads of Department on Genl. Jackson’s case, will be seen in the inclosed draft of a letter to the General, which is submitted to your consideration. Be so good as to return it with your instructions to alter it, or to send it in its present shape. There is no other copy of the letter. The fact of the release of Judge Hall and Mr. Dick is stated in a second...