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Altho a reluctance to Letter writing grows daily more, and more upon me, your Mothers Letter to your Grandfather, and the communication she made, has aroused me from my S t upor, and calld forth all my sensibility your Youth alone allarms me. I know you to be a prudent discreet and virtuous Child, from principles well founded: which will be a Seenrity to any Gentleman, whom you may favour with...
I wrote to you last week. Our election is over, and Mr. Gerry and Gray undoubtedly elected by a majority of more than two thousand votes. Vermont and New-Hampshire have elected republican Governors. A prodigious revolution in the sentiments and opinions of the people of these States has been effected by the conduct of England and France towards us; but more particularly the shuffling, tricking...
I know my dear Child I shall wound your affectionate heart when I communicate to you the affliction we are all in, for the loss of our dear little Francis. She Struggled for a Month with the hooping cough, and I flatterd myself that She would get the better of it, but it proved too hard for her delicate Frame & on Wednesday the 24th her pure and spotless Spirit assended to heaven, their to...
Yesterday your father received a letter from William. We rejoice to learn that you are well; and I have the pleasure to inform that we are all getting better, and that I intend to dine below to-day. I congratulate you that the embargo is like to be raised. I hope the non-intercourse bill will be lost; and the merchantmen send out frigates to convoy the trade, molest no one, and defend...
Do you think my Dear Girl, because you are married, that you are to lay asside your pen, and neglect your correspondents? No. No. you ought to be Stimulated to great exertions, for your fancy is now to keep at home, where all your joys and happiness are to center. here you have ample reason to be satisfied, with a partner whose Character, all Tongues, pronounce—Truly Estimable I consider it a...
I rejoice to learn by Caroline’s letter to Susan, (which in her absence I took the liberty of opening,) that you had made an excursion to visit a friend. We stand in need of some variety to keep both body and mind in tune. The bountiful Parent of the universe has amply supplied our wants in this respect, by the succession of day and night, of seed time and harvest, of summer and winter, to...
I do not know how our account stands, whether I am indebted for a letter or you, but I shall not be very strict with you; I am always delighted with your letters, whether to me or to Susan; we talk daily of you, and wish for you, and when I think how far you all are from me, I am ready to sit down and weep. We go on much in the old way here—now and then a large party, then a few friends....
How are you to day? have you heard from weymouth? I send you a Barrel of pears and a Barrel of Russet Apples. if you have them put under your corn House untill the weather freezes they will keep better I also ask your acceptance of a Barrel of Rye flower—I hope I Shall be able to See you tomorrow: I am taking calomil to day—I Send the Linnen and my two Trunks which you have always been So kind...
Received Quincy 9th Feby 1810 of T. B Adams Twenty-five Dolls and fifty Cents in full for One quarter’s interest due upon J Q. Adams’s Note due the first instant. $25.50 MHi : Adams Papers.
Through Caroline De Wint, I was last Evening informd that your Mother has had a return of the complaint which so much allarmd Us, when She resided here.—Caroline supposed mr Johnson has or would write to inform us of it. but as we have not received any information from any other quarter, I would fain flatter myself that your Dear Mother is better. I have not acquainted Susan, as I wish much to...
The weather has been so intensely cold for near a Month past that I have not taken a pen or attempted to write a Letter, nor have I acknowledged yours of Janry 15th received a fortnight ago, nor Johns bearing date 1st of Jan’ry. without any snow upon the ground we have had a Month of the coldest weather I recollect to have experienced Since the year your Father and Brother saild for France....
To cheer the gloom which, in despite of my efforts to dispel, will hang about my heart upon the return of this day, which used to be endeared to me by the presence of your brother, I must have recourse to my pen and write about him, whilst my imagination follows him upon the ocean, sometimes wafted by gentle gales, and sometimes buffeting the winds and the waves. You, too, have your anxieties...
Balance due upon a former re paid Jobe Tinil for a Small trunk Lock and Key for John 1 33 paid Louisa Dexter knitting one pr Socks 25 100 11 30 Received in full 100 5 MHi : Adams Papers.
your uncle and I ask the pleasure of mr Greenleafs and your Company to dinner tomorrow. Your Aunt MWA : Adams Papers.
Received Quincy August 7th: 1810 of Thomas B Adams the sum of twenty-five Dollars and fifty Cents in full for one Quarter’s interest in J Q Adams’s Note of hand. $25:50 MHi : Adams Papers.
I have not had a line from you for several weeks. Your father visits the post-office every post day; and, although he frequently returns with his pockets full of letters, I do not find among them the superscription which is dearer to me than all the rest. You must know, since he has publicly avowed himself the father of the whole nation , he has a most prodigious number of letters from his...
Quincy November 13th: 1813 Recd: of Thomas B Adams the sum of Twenty-five Dollars and fifty Cents in full for One quarter’s Interest due on J Q Adams Esqr Note, the first instant. $25.50 MHi : Adams Papers.
Coll. Bradford came out to day with a card of invitation from the Govenour, and an other from the Govr and Senate requesting your Father to celebrate the fourth of july with them, he has accepted the invitation. if you receive an invitation, both your Father and I advise you to accept it. if you do not, I shall depend upon the pleasure of seeing you at Quincy with Mrs Adams Kitty & the...
I heard last Evening of the melancholy event, and sincerely sympathize with the afflicted family I send you some peices of crape they are rusty, but the best we have. if you attend the funeral, and want a Bonnet, if mine will answer and my crape cloak they are at your service—I intended to have asked You here to day to have past it, with mrs Cushing and Caroline, but a melancholy duty calls...
Received Quincy July 27th 1809 of John Q Adams Esqr the sum of fifty-three Dollars and twelve Cents, in full for interest on $1700 from the 18th: January to the 7th August 1809. $53.12 MHi : Adams Papers.
I Send your Mother a Bottle of Hermitage wine which on Serching the cellar we found. I hope it will prove a cordial to her. it is more mild than port, and excellent for herI pray it may be blest to her restoration MWA : Adams Papers.
Received Quincy March 4th 1814 of Thomas B Adams Esqr Twenty-five Dollars and fifty Cents in full for one quarter’s interest on J Q Adams’s Note $ 25.50 MHi : Adams Papers.
It is so long Since I received a Letter from you or any of the Family that I am not a little anxious to hear. I have attributed it to the great fall of Snow which has obstructed prevented the Southern post getting in Regular Succession—and we have learnt that the Northern Roads are still more obstructed—yet I have Sent every Post to the office in hopes to hear. I have written You Several...
Recd: Quincy August 1st: 1813 of T B Adams Esqr the sum of Twenty-five dollars and fifty Cents, being a Quarter’s interest on J Q Adams’s note. $25.50 MHi : Adams Papers.
Recd: Quincy May 10th: 1814 of Thomas B Adams Esqr Twenty-five dollars & fifty Cents in full for a quarters interest on J Q Adams’s Note. $25.50 PPAmP : Sol Feinstone Collection.
Your two last letters of March 10th and 23d, came safe to hand. They gave me great pleasure, not only from learning by them that you enjoyed good health, but your spirits were more animated from your little excursions from home, and from your prospects with respect to your family. I most sincerely rejoice in any event which looks like prosperity. Your trials have been many and various. You...
My dear Daughter Survived but a few hours after you left us—She lay much in the Same State untill twelve oclock when after a few Struggles her Spirit was releasd to join those of your dear Parents and many others of the just made perfect—whilst I mourn for her I bless God, that her Sufferings were not greater, and pray for divine Support MWA .
Received Quincy September 14th: 1814 of Thomas B Adams Esqr: Twenty-one Dollars and eighty seven Cents, for one quarter’s interest due on JQ Adams’s note due August 1st:— $21.87 MHi : Adams Papers.
Received Quincy December 28th., 1814 of Thomas B Adams Esqr., the sum of Twenty-one Dollars and seventy-five Cents, for one quarter’s interest due November 1st: on JQ Adams’s Note. $21.75 MHi : Adams Papers.
You will, I know, share with your father and me, in lamenting the death of our ancient friend, our physician, the constant correspondent and endearing companion; the benevolent, learned, and ever to be regretted Rush. It is indeed a heavy stroke; an unexpected one to your father: one for which we were unprepared, having a weekly correspondence with him for a long time. On Saturday last we...
Yesterday your father brought me the much–desired packet. You mention General Eaton’s town–meeting speech, which I had seen. I presume he was in spirits when he made it; his virulence against Mr. —— is really personal—thereby hangs a tale. Mr. Lear, you know, made a treaty with Tripoli, which, through the misrepresentation of Eaton and his intrigues, had like to have been rejected by the...
I have not had a line from you for many weeks. Your Father visits the post office every post day and altho he frequently returns with his pocket full of Letters I find not amongst them the Superscription which is dearer to me than all the rest. You must know Since he has publickly avowed himself the Father of the Whole Nation, he has a most prodigious number of Letters from his adopted ospring...
Having been attacked this morning with a dangerous Complaint, I have requested Louisa to write you a few lines enclosing a Note, The disposition of which, I wrote you my request, in my last Letter dated December 1815—which Letter, and note, I deliver to Louisa Smith—to keep untill your return— MHi : Adams Papers.
By mistake two of your Shirts were Sent without marking. ask mrs Welsh if She will let her woman mark them for you. I Send your Jacket & overalls Charles coat & two of your Shirts Send me word if the Jacket fits & the overalls—and Send a waistcoat that fits you to make one by. let Charles have your white Jacket. I do not think It is worth altering. I Shall have an other Nankeen made for you—I...
I yesterday received your letter of June 1st. I think letters are longer upon their passage than they used to be, when you were at Quincy. Since I wrote to you in May, I have been visited by St. Anthony, and most severely scourged by him: he first attacked one of my ears, but as I was wholly ignorant of the holy visiter, I paid little attention to him, except endeavouring to quiet him by bread...
Received Quincy 7th. May 1810 of Thomas B. Adams the sum of Twenty-five Dollars: fifty Cents in full for one quarter’s interest due on John Q Adams’s Note— $25:50 MHi : Adams Papers.
Did you think that Grandmother would be the first of your Correspondents to write to you? aya She Said little to you, but thought more than She utterd, first because She knew it was a hard Struggle for a Young Girl, who had formed Several agreable acquaintance, who were equally attachd to her to quit them, and next She Supposed that Some reluctance was felt at leaving aged Grandparents to whom...
If you will Send Lucy & Johny here to day we will take care of them. Betsy Says She knows her Mother will watch to night if you want her, and I will try to get an other for you. MWA : Adams Papers.
Mr and Mrs Adams present their Love to mr and Mrs Tufts and miss Lucy and ask the pleasure of their company to dinner tomorrow—two oclock. a family dinner. no other company but their Father and Mother— DCHi .
your Mother has been So constant in writing that I have been the more remiss. I am glad to find that you are content, and happy I hope. I was in Boston on Saturday, and bought for you a Box of paints, and Bennets Letters. I Sent them to mr Phineas Fosters with a request that you he would take them to Haverhill for you. Charles Welch who understands paints pronounced them very good, and in the...
My consolation is, that you cannot go “ where universal love smiles not around Sustaining all yon orbs, and all their Suns From seeming evil still educing good” your Mothers Legacy May a blessing accompany it— MHi : Adams Papers.
After a year’s absence I came yesterday to make a visit to my friends for three days. Our anxiety to hear from you, led me to send to the office this morning for letters; there I found yours of May 31st, containing tidings that my fears had anticipated, as you will find when you receive my last letter. My dear child, you will be again called to severe and afflictive scenes; may you be...
It is a great grief to me my dear sister that I can do So little for you in your trouble when I owe So much to you. beside being much of an invalid myself Jackson is very Sick keeps his Bed—and a thousand cares devolve upon me in concequence of the Sudden determination very reluctantly enterd into from a sense at this late period, without any previous arrangment. but all this is Small in...
Mr Lincoln our Carpenter came this morning from Weymouth he saw mrs Humphries who watchd last night with Mrs Norten. She Said that mrs Norten was a little revived this morning I hope with trembling—may we be enabled to say Gods will be done for herself we need feel no anxiety. She will be relieved from her Earthly duties which Seem too great for her feeble Frame frame but for her Friends and...
Inclosed is a Letter from Charles, by the hand writing. I received it yesterday, with a Letter from Mrs Adams dated 2 October: they were all well then, but I presume mrs Smith gets Letters frequently—I cover the Letter to your Father to you I wrote him one last week and sent to the valley, not recollecting that he might have left it. if he has not received it, you will be So good as to tell...
Your neat, pretty letter, looking small, but containing much, reached me this day. I have a good mind to give you the journal of the day. Six o’clock. Rose, and, in imitation of his Britannic Majesty, kindled my own fire. Went to the stairs, as usual, to summon George and Charles. Returned to my chamber, dressed myself. No one stirred. Called a second time, with voice a little raised. Seven...
I received your letter this day, written from Springfield; this has been a relief to us to hear that you were well, and that your dear mother bore her journey so well. After you left me I felt no restraint upon me, and could give way to all I felt and all I had suppressed; my harp was upon the willow, and my spirits at a very low ebb; I have in some measure recovered them, and follow you daily...
It is sometime since I have written to you and I feel that I owe you a Letter; you do not like our state movement any better than I do the long and and numerous Speeches of your wordy Fraternity. yet I like to read them, and when the character of the Gentleman is preserved, and due respect paid to constituted Authorities, I listen to the opposite Parties with pleasure, but I must say too many...
I mentiond to mr D. Greenleaf the money which was to have been Sent to the Young Cranchs for their use. he Said he had found a minut of it in mr Cranch’s Books and that he had written to Judge Cranch respecting it, and that he waited for his direction, respecting which he expected soon to receive— My Love to cousin Abbe. tell her the more She writes, the better She will love it—and that She...
I had got comfortably through the cold of the winter, but the chilling winds of March have laid me up in April. I was threatend with a Setled fever last week, which has reduced me in a few days quite low. the dr gives me hopes that he has broken it up with opium & calomil pills—and saline . I feel relieved both in my head and Limbs—and am now able to write, which I was not last week. I did...