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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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    • Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
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I never know how to let a vessel go from Boston, without a Letter to Some of the Family. I have just written by the Mary, for Liverpool, but as a Gentleman calld yesterday to request Letters, I have given him one, for my Son, and one for mr Smith. this I have directed to be put in the Bag, as it incloses one from your Sister Hellen, which She Sent one for you— Mr Brooks has taken charge of the...
Altho I have not the pleasure to acknowledg any Letter from you of a more recent date, than one by mr Forbes of Sep’ber last, which I only received a few days since, I will thank you for that, and am happy that I can congratulate you, upon a change in the aspect of our National affairs since that date, when they appeard to us in America; in not much less of a gloomy cast than to you in St...
I am indebted to you for several very entertaining Letters, while I have not any thing in return to amuse you with. Some marriages amongst the young folk are taking place, miss E Gerry last week to a Major Townsend. Susan was at the visit party. She is well married it is Said. a daughter of doctor Hoolbrooks to a mr Vincet, Brother to mrs E Everet who was lately in England. miss Hoolbrook is...
Altho’ I have repeatedly written to you Since I received a Letter from you, I am not critical in that respect. judging from my own feelings, I think a Letter from a Friend always acceptable and altho’ they cannot be so interesting to you, as when your sons were with me, yet they may convey the assuriance of the Love and regard of which I bear you; and the interest I take in whatever concerns...
By a vessel which saild a week since, I wrote to my Son, and Grandson’s. by this I shall write only to you, and acknowledge your favour of 2d Jan’ry. I was very sorry to learn that George had been attack’d with a Rheumatic complaint, a disorder, which when once in the constitution, continues a torment through Life. Georges Growth, has been so rapid, that he must not be forced to great...
I must inclose a Note to you, to Say that this morning the mail from Utica in N york, informd me that I am again a Great Grandmother, Abbe Johnson was deliverd of a son upon the 3rd. of this Month, mr Johnson writes that he has a head of Black hair and black Eyes. a fine Boy you may be sure. and that he has taken the Liberty to call him after his Great Grandfather, Mother and Babe well upon...
I have had Such repeated melancholy tidings to communicate to you, Since your absence, and your own Bosom has been so often wounded, that I have felt loth to take up my pen to address you, upon an event which has plunged me in Greif, in which I know you cannot fail to participate. you knew—you loved, and you valued the dear departed Child whom I mourn. She is gone I trust to reap the Reward of...
Altho I cannot have the pleasure of acknowledging any Letter from you of a more recent date than one by mr Forbes last Sep’br, I will thank you for that, altho only received a few days Since—I am happy that I can congratulate you upon a change in the aspect of publick affairs respecting our own County. Since that date—the return of peace was haild here by all parties, and the first Spontanious...
I hope the afflicting intelligence which you must receive from your Friends at Washington, will not be too suddenly burst upon you, but that your best Friend may have been intrusted with it, that he may prepare your mind for the heavey tydings. I know that mrs Hellen was a dear and favorite sister to you all, and well deserving of your attachment. The circumstances which deprived you of her,...
I always like to send to every one some token of remembrance by writing to each, altho, I á derth of Subjects at the present day will not afford matter for amusement; a Letter upon Literary subjects, is not wanted in a country which abounds in every work of the kind, but as I do not consider, myself capable of being a reviewer—I shall only speak my private opinion, many of the modern writers...