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Navy estimate Oct. 1803.   D In actual service.  2. frigates 209,807.36  5. small vessels 185,158.19 394,965.55 In ordinary. 11. frigates 180,845.17 Pay of officers on shore  27,500.   208,345.17 Contingencies  40,000. Ordnance & stores  15,000. Marine corps
May 16. Deptmt War. Pichon’s complt of not returng salute to flag at N.O. Presents to Indns. at St. Louis. tobo. Whiskey. Capt. Lewis says 2000 D war between Kickapoos & oth. Indns. E. of Misipi, & Osages Homestubbe’s talk. Poutewatamies have killed the Indian murderers Capt Stoddart . barracks wanted at St. Louis a stone fort intended as only a bastion. gorge wants closing best to erect...
Names of the Senators of Sou. Carolina Those marked R. are Republicans, D. are doubtful, and F. are Federals Jno. Gailliard President, R J Blake R R Marion R R Barnwell F Jno. McPherson F J Blasinghame D C. C. Pinckney F Josh. Calhoun R R Pinckney, F Levy Casey—R J. Postell Senr. F Wm. A Deas—F B Rogers—F Elias Earl—R Arthur Simpkins R Ths. Farrar R OBrian Smith R C Godwin
Canons of Etiquette to be observed by the Executive. 1. Foreign ministers arriving at the seat of government pay the first visit to the ministers of the nation, which is returned: and so likewise on subsequent occasions of reassembling after a recess. 2. The families of foreign ministers recieve the 1st. visit from those of the National ministers, as from all other residents and as all...
The Washington Federalist of the 1st. inst. has published what he calls the ‘Etiquette of the court of the US.’ in his facts, as usual, truth is set at nought, & in his principles little correct to be found. the Editor having seen a great deal of unfounded stuff on this subject, in that & other papers of a party whose first wish it is to excite misunderstandings with other nations, (even with...
Ingraham’s case for carrying on the slave trade. 1801. Feb. action of q.t. institd. by J. W. Leonard Nov. verdict & jdmt for 14,000 D. & costs. does not appear that any term of imprismt entered into the quantum of punmt adjudged. act of 1794. c.11. §.4. inflicts 200. D. for every slave, by qui tam. 1800. c.51. respects slave trade betw. foreign ports, or in forn. vesls. the conviction then has...
Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States of America, To       Greeting: Reposing especial Trust and Confidence in Your Integrity, Prudence and Ability I have appointed you the said      Minister Plenipotentiary for the United States of America at the Court of His Britannic Majesty, authorizing you hereby to do and perform all such matters and things as to the said place or office do...
The government of the US. being desirous of informing itself of the extent of the country lately ceded to them under the name of Louisiana, to have the same, with it’s principal rivers, geographically delineated, to learn the character of it’s soil, climate, productions, & inhabitants, you are appointed to explore , for these purposes, the interesting portion of it which lies on the Arkansa...
Heads of a lease to Richard Gamble. 5. fields North of the road, of 40 acres each. to wit 4. on the Shadwell tract now leased to J. Perry, and one on the Lego tract, adjoining to the Upper field of Shadwell, including the ground already open there & about Reynolds’s house, & as much more to be opened adjacent as will make up 40. acres. the lease to commence Oct. 15. 1804. (being John Perry’s...
Notes of Wabash Salines. on Saline creek which empties into Ohio 16. mi. below Wabash the Saline is 16. miles up the creek, which is navigable, & 16. miles across from the nearest part of Wabash. the bed or saline marsh is about 20. yards square. it ought to be so worked as to make 100. bush. salt a day. this would require boilers of 15,000. galls. contents. containg. 40. galls. each, they...
relative to the written agreement between Eliz. & John Henderson the probability is it was only an agreemt instead of a lease of the house . Kemp Catlett was the only witness to it; but he knows nothing of it’s contents, nor does he even remember the appearance of the face of it, having had nothing to do with it but to sign it as a witness. Richard Price saw the instrument soon after it’s...
To George Wythe, judge of the High court of Chancery of the district of Richmond in the commonweatlth of Virginia.  Humbly complaining sheweth unto your honor your orator Craven Peyton of the county of Albemarle that Bennet Henderson late of the same county being in his lifetime seized & possessed in feesimple of a tract of land therein on the Rivanna river surrounding & adjacent to the town...
Tomson J. Skinner of Massachusets to be Commissioner of loans for Massachus ets William Few of New York to be Commissioner of loans for New York Daniel Humphreys of New Hampshire to be Atty for the US. in the district of New Ha mpshire Thomas Rutter of Maryland to be Marshal for the district of Maryland. Joshua Prentiss of Massachusets to be Surveyor of the   of Marblehead and Inspector of the...
Jan. 26. Colo Burr the V.P. calls on me in the evening, having previously asked an opportunity of conversing with me. he began by recapitulating summarily that he had come to N.Y. a stranger some years ago, that he found the country in possn of two rich families, (the Livingstons & Clintons) that his pursuits were not political & he meddled not. when the crisis however of 1800. came on, they...
Sketch of the Apparent, Monthly Balances—Advances in the Presidents a/c with J Barnes will Appear from the Annexed Statem. Commencing 1802 1802 Monthly Int. a 6 ⅌ Ct Jany 30. To Amt of a/- rendd. ⅌ leds. 117. 5346.55. Feby 8. By Warrt. deducted  " 2000.  Feby. 8th 3346.55. 16 50. to Mar 4
 Doctr. Stevens’s case. I consider the annual act which appropriates a given sum to the expences of intercourse with foreign nations, as a sufficient authority to the President (the constitutional organ of foreign intercourse) to expend that sum for the purposes of foreign intercourse, at his discretion. if he abuses that discretion he is responsible for it in a constitutional way. the legal...
May. 15. 04 State Judge Davies’s enquiries mr Merry’s case Pichon’s memorial he hazards general assertions neither proved nor true the law of nations does not make a nation responsible for acts of individuals out of it’s limits. yet friendly nations do watch to a certain degree. does France watch the atrocities of it’s privateers men with & without commissions it to be assurd. on our part of...
Benjamin Galloway of Elizabeth Town Washington County and State of Maryland respectfully presents the Underwritten to the Senate and House of Delegates of the State aforesaid in General Assembly convened— That the State of Maryland now is, and of Right has been a free and independant State ever since the fourth day of July one thousand seven hundred and seventy six. That Luther Martin now is,...
N. Hampsh. 5. Verm. 4. ✓ — Betton, Silas ✓ — Chamberlain ✓ — Claggett. Clifton. ✓ — Chittenden Martin ✓ — Hough David ✓ Elliott James ✓
Resources Balance in the treasury Oct. 1. 1803. say 5,888,000. Revenue of 5. quarters to Dec. 31. 1804 @ 10,400,000. 13,000,000  Arrears of direct taxes & other sources 150,000  Louisiana  200,000. 19,238,000  Demands in last In last quarter of 1803  Balance due to 7,300,000 D. approprn. 2,350,000   ¼ of last years estimate for other objects 650,000.   British paiment
By the President of the United States. A PROCLAMATION. WHEREAS by the first articles of the terms and conditions declared by the President of the United States on the seventeenth day of October, 1791, for regulating the Materials and manner of buildings and improvements on the lots in the city of Washington, it is provided that “the outer and party walls of all houses in the said city shall be...
Mr. King to mr Madison. N.Y. Dec. 22. 1803. 1. all foreign ministers pay the 1st. visit to the ministers of Engld. by going in their carriage & leaving a card without asking for them. this visit is rarely if ever returned. 2. foreign ministers nor their wives never invited to Queen’s balls, concerts, parties. the king gives none. at king’s levee forn. & domest. ministers, dignifd clergy, Ld....
P.S. the Northern boundary of Louisiana, Coterminous with the possessions of England. The limits of Louisiana have been spoken of, in the preceding statement , as if those established to the West & North, by the charter of Louis XIV. remained still unaltered. in the West they are so, as already explained. but, in the North, a material change has taken place. with this however it was...
In order to bring the members of society together in the first instance the custom of the country has established that the residents shall pay the 1st. visit to strangers, & among strangers first comers to later comers, foreign & domestic; When brought together in society all are perfectly equal, whether foreign or domestic, titled or untitled, in or out of office. To the 1st. rule there is a...
1804. May. 26. Present the Secretaries and Atty Genl. What terms of peace with Tripoli shall be agreed to? if successful, insist on their deliverg. up men without ransom, and reestablishing old treaty without paying any thing. if unsuccessful, rather than have to continue the war, agree to give 500. D. a man, (having first deducted for the prisoners we have taken) and the sum in gross &...
Jacob I. Cohen William Hull Wm. Vaughan for Portland           Worcester . Samuel Flagg Abraham Lincoln Francis Blake MS ( DNA : RG 59, LAR , 2:0414); undated but see Lincoln to TJ
New Hampsh Massachu R. Island Connecticut Vermont New York New Jersey Pennsylva Delaware Maryland Virginia N. Carola S. Carola Georgia Tennissee Kentucky Ohio
Bill. in 1802. purchased the dower of Eliz. Henderson that John Henderson is digging a race thro’ the lands prays injunction. Answer of J. Henderson. in Nov. 1801. he entered into written contract with the sd Elizabeth relative to sundry matters, & among others that it was agreed that he should have all the sd Eliz’s right to so much of her sd dower lands as might be necessary for the purpose...
Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States of America, To      Greeting: Reposing especial Trust and Confidence in Your Integrity, Prudence and Ability I have appointed you the said      Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of France, authorizing you hereby to do and perform all such matters and things as to the said place or office do appertain, or as...
✓ 1799. Dec. 28. James L. Henderson to Tucker Woodson. deed for ‘all his right &c in the lands of his father,’ to wit 1 10 & reversion of dower except his interest in the mill now standing, and the lot occupied by Henderson & Connard; but conveys all the other unsold lots in Milton, in considn of a negro man James or £110. & of the relinqmt of a debt of 152. D. due from sd James to Tucker....
N. Hampshire— only one Master & one Mate revenue Cutter—Hopley Yeaton & Benj. Gunnison. appd. 31 Augt. 1802—both rep. rep.  6.—.—. Massachusset— Jonas Clarke collect. Kennebunk—fed. appd. only  Inspector of revenue by Mr Jefferson } 13. 3.21 Fred. L. Delesdernier collect.  Passamaquody rep. certainly } —see page 52
Period —What? of representations or of restoration of deposit? propositions had been authorized—When? prior to that period? Quere subsequent appropriation—to what? to the authorizan. of proposition by executive? enlightened mind of first Consul— Treaties now laid before both houses— —— Introduce idea of possession of N. Orleans being a bond of Union and, if possible, of prevention of early...
33II. Cipher Table, [April 1803?] (Jefferson Papers)
suppose the key word to be ‘antipodes’ write it thus. a n t i p o d e s a n t i p o d e s
Interest account between J. Barnes & Th: Jefferson from 1801. Mar. 4. to 1803. May 4. 1801. Monthly balance Int. of month at 6.p.Ct. Articles of discount between those dates paid by Th:J. extracted from the accounts. Mar. 4. 316. 485 1.58 D Apr. 4. 316. 40 1.58 1801. July 25.
Washington, Mississippi Territory, 23 Apr. 1804 . Rodney sends TJ a detailed account of the western country, including descriptions of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers and their respective valleys. He has received only imperfect information regarding the west side of the Mississippi. The business of the land office is progressing, but he awaits the supplementary act from Congress before...
Hollis —Hollis near Bushtown Maryland, comes every year to fish in the Patowmac opposite Alexandria. he says that it is best to leave the head on the fish, because when taken off the fish becomes much drier. he considers what is called gobbing them as much the best method, that is to take out the gills & entrails, & leave the row and head. he has sold this year @ 3⅓ D. the barrel he will...
Sketch of Apparent Monthly Balances on The Presidents a/c with J Barnes, will Appear from the Annexed Statemt. Commencing Viz 1803 1803. Monthly Int. a 6 ⅌ Ct. Jany. 10. To amt. of a/c rendered (46)  $2268.70 shd be 2268.50 to 31. To additional expenditures 2668.50. 4937. Feby 7. By Warrant deducted 2000.  Feby 7th 2937.  14.—
This indenture made on the 4th. day of May 1804. between Craven Peyton of the one part and Thomas Jefferson of the other, both of the county of Albemarle, witnesseth that Whereas the said Craven hath, at various times, and by various contracts deeds & other instruments, purchased from the widow & representatives of the late Bennet Henderson all their rights & interests in a tract of land held...
On the reciept of your letter of Dec. 1. I referred it to the Secretary of the Treasury for information, sending him the inclosed loan-office certificate, his answer is that if the certificate be genuine it might have been funded under the funding act, until it became barred by the act of limitation of Mar. 3. 1795. & that act having been further suspended till the 12th. of June 1799 in favor...
Your letter of the 12th. inst. has not come to hand. I have now recieved that of the 18th. informing me that on a call for 480. men from your brigade 1119 young & active citizens have voluntarily offered their service to their country. this offer merits & meets the highest praise: and whenever the moment arrives in which the public rights must appeal to the public arm for support, they will be...
The affectionate sentiments which you have had the goodness to express in your letter of May 20. towards my dear departed daughter, have awakened in me sensibilities natural to the occasion, & recalled your kindnesses to her which I shall ever remember with gratitude & friendship. I can assure you with truth they had made an indelible impression on her mind, and that, to the last, on our...
It was with regret, that I left Boston without seeing you again, but we were in such a state of uncertainty, till it was tame to take our departer, that it was not in my power. I am extremely sorry to hear by Mrs Cushing that you was very unwell, when she left you; but hope that you are quite recovered; by this, & that you will enjoy the society of your friends and neighbours this winter,...
I was in hopes ere this time of having the satisfaction of seeing you here, but from what I could learn from Dr Bourn of Barnstable, who spoke with the President last week, it is to be feared that your unfortunate fall has occasioned a much longer confinement than we flattered ourselves it would. I have several times been determined that another week should not pass without my writing, but my...
Know all Men by these Presents, that We John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Esquire, and Abigail Adams his Wife, In consideration of one Dollar to each of us paid by John Quincy Adams of Boston in the County of Suffolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts aforesaid Esquire, the Receipt whereof We do hereby acknowledge and for diverse other good and...
Though your last Letter was not immediately answered, I offer no apology but my own frequent infirmity. It was, my dear Mrs Adams, a very pleasant circumstance to me, to receive an account from your own hand, of your appreciated health, nor did I find in your late letter, any marks of the shattered condition of your head, of which you complain.—Indeed, I think the bough that bends to the gale,...
It has been many weeks since I have heard from you; I hope you have enjoyed health. Our Winter has been very temperate, so warm that we could have no sleighing, & great dificulty the people have had to transport the produce of their rich Farms—I pitied their Cattle, more than their Masters for many broke their Limbs, & died. I mended a Shirt and several things for Cousin William and John which...
We have been under the necessity of delaying our journey a few days on account of the marriage of Harriet which took place on thursday evening at eight o’clock since which I have been so much engaged with company and preparations for my departure It has not been in my power to write you untill this morning—We propose leaving this place on Tuesday morning and shall probably reach Quincy in...
I have just received your affectionate letter of the 15th:— and do not a moment delay to answer your question— I did attend the meeting of members at the Capitol on the 23d: of last Month— but not without invitation— I received the same invitation, which was given to the other members— And besides that I was also personally urged to attend, by another member of the Senate— I did not attend...
By the last mail, I had the honour, and the pleasure, to receive your most acceptable letter—To be indeed remembered by you, and with so much distinction, was what I had rather hoped , than expected. Yet it was an hope, so flattering to my pride, and so grateful to some better feelings, that it had been fondly cherish’d, and had served to brighten many of the hours since we parted. I was made...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. my charities to Callender are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796. I was told in Philadelphia that Callender, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...