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We came to the City on the 4th The weather & roads were as favorable as could be expected for the season. At New-York we had the pleasure to hear from Mrs Smith, that your health was much better than when we were at Quincey. Judge Cranch was so good as to engage us lodgings; they are as agreeable as any here, although not so pleasant to us as the last winter. I have been twice to see Mrs...
I wrote a line to my father, from New-York, enclosing a letter for Mr: Shaw, and informing you of our safe arrival thus far, upon our Journey.—We stopp’d at New-York two days, and then proceeded with as much expedition as we found practicable, untill we reached Baltimore. We stopp’d only one Night at Philadelphia, and had no opportunity to visit any of our acquaintance there—We came on in the...
The enclosed publications should have been sent by your Son. The Account of Christr: Ludwick was written to fulfil an Old promise made many years ago, in case I should survive him. You will feel the patriotic Sentiments uttered by him. To the present calculating generation, they appear fanatical, and unintelligible.— I send you the Account of the successful use of Mercury in the Consumption,...
I am almost asham’d to acknowledge how long it has been since I wrote you last, and can only hope you will consider my numerous letters to my brother, most of which I intended as much for you as for him, to be a sufficient apology—I have not received a line from you or from my father since last June, though I think it impossible but that you should have written more than once—My last letter to...
Your favor of the 1st. inst. was duly recieved, and I would not again have intruded on you but to rectify certain facts which seem not to have been presented to you under their true aspect. My charities to Callendar are considered as rewards for his calumnies. as early, I think, as 1796, I was told in Philadelphia that Callendar, the author of the Political progress of Britain, was in that...
I received your Kind letter of the 8th. inst. and was extremely sorry to hear of the indisposition of the President and your Son Your own health is I trust considerably mended and that you will soon be enabled to return to your usual avocations I am sorry to repeat what I said in my last regarding Mr. Adams’s health I have not it continues very bad and I am very apprehensive it will end in a...
My brother enclosed me Alibone’s bill for flour sent to you, & about which you wrote to me. I will pay it and send you a receipt, very soon. You enquired in one of your last letters, who is Mr. Hemphill that so much distinguished himself by his speech on the judiciary law? He is a young man, from the County of Chester, who was bred to the bar, studied in the Country and until sent to Congress,...
Indolence shall no longer prevent my acknowledging, the pleasure I felt (my dear Mrs. Adams) from your kind & affectionate letter which I received some time ago. Your sentiments on the subject of friends are so congenial with my own, that I wish by every means in my power, to cherish with the warmest affection, the few that are spared to me. The last respects were paid to our friend Mrs...
The first thing I look for in all the letters I receive from Quincy, is that which relates to our children, who cannot speak for themselves, and both of whom we left indisposed, and when I find that they are well, I feel myself relieved thus far, and only hope that the rest of the letter may contain information equally pleasing, of all the other persons in whose welfare I am so deeply...
I have received your favors of the 18th. ult: and 2d. instant, the latter enclosing a valuable communication from my father; for which please to express my thanks. I have taken note of those “thoughts on the times,” and will make use of them. I hope Mr. Ames , will continue to expand his thoughts on those topics. The Port Folio begins to get into Some favor all over the Country, and the...
Our city has sustained a very great loss in the death of Dr. Bailey. As health officer, he was obliged to reside upon Staten Island, to which the sick from the vessels that came in were carried, and the hospitals have been crowded all summer with the Irish emigrants; he has taken the fever from them, and was only ill four or five days. He has not left his equal as a physician most certainly in...
As the vacation draws near—and consequently the time to settle who are to form our family for the winter Term, I wish to know whether you intend Susan shall stay—I am resolved to keep no other so young—but her Abilities are so good and her constitution so firm, that it will be a pleasure to have her with us if you wish it—She will then have a double advantage as she will be with the older...
Your favor of the 22d: inst. ulto, has been a few days in hand. I thank you kindly for “the word intended for my private ear,” and shall avail myself freely of the offer, when occasion may require. Since I wrote you last, I concluded that it was hardly worth while to Insure the Carriage, and therefore if fortune has proved adverse, your loss will be total as to the body of the Coach only,...
I have received your kind letter of January; and shall particularly attend to your directions at Philadelphia, respecting the flour—It is at present my intention to leave this place the 4th: of next month; but the winter and the roads are now breaking up; so that I know not whether the roads will at that time be passable The termination of this Congress will leave our public affairs in a...
We are again permitted to return home in good health, after having passed as pleasant a winter as the times would permit. Mr Cushing was confined to his room three weeks with a great cold, attended with a slight fever, but his spirits were good even at that time, & he saw company every day. He attended Court 19th. Feby & on the 22nd. sat near seven hours without once leaving the bench, with as...
Agreable to your wish, expressed some months past, Mrs: Smith, accompanied by Miss Caroline and Our son William, pay you a visit, I lament that it is not in my power to accompany them, but agreable to the old tune, I cannot leave my post, as Besides the paper War is recommencing, and as We are threatned with a broad side, I must recive it, & proceed to action, against the Clintonian...
I have at length returned to the City for the purpose of remaining in it during the rest of the Season. We do not yet pretend to be free from cases of autumnal fever, which have been particularly malignant and fatal; but those, who, like myself, are believers in domestic origin, may return without apprehension. From my brother I have had accounts, from time to time, of the health of our family...
Your very kind letter has eased my heart of a load of anxiety, on account of our dear George, whose health appear’d to me to be in a very indifferent state. and I could not have quitted him with any satisfaction, had I not placed him under your protection. recieve my dear Madam our united thanks for your extreme kindness in taking him to Atkinson which journey I sincerely hope proved...
I fear my dear Madam that long before this you have taxed me with neglect. But however strong appearances are against me, not a day has passed since we parted in a snow storm, that my good wishes for your health & happiness have been omitted. Mr Cushing had business at Norwich, which obliged us to return that way. I then intended & fully expected, as soon as we had arranged the family in some...
A few days since I recieved your very obliging letter in which you mention having procured the articles I wrote for and for which I return you many thanks. I am much distressed at the idea your letter seems to convey of want of respect or attention to Mrs. Cranch it has ever been my most ardent desire so to conduct myself to every branch of your family as not only to merit their esteem but...
I had anticipated a visit from Mrs Adams, & both her Children, for a few days at least, when she came to Haverhill, & we regretted very much that it was not in our power to send for them, or to visit her while there—Abby, & I, both went down a monday, and had the mortification to find she went to Boston the Saturday before—Mr Peabody was absent the whole of your Thansgiving week, & I could not...
I was much disappointed My Dear Madam in not having it in my power to see you again before we went to Newport & also in not calling on Mrs J Adams & Miss Johnston to have renewed my invitation to them that they would give us the pleasure of a visit this summer. I regret that I did not see them the day we were at Quincey; Delays are dangerous. Court held at Boston till Friy eveg prier to its...
I have your favor of the 7th: instt: before me; the letter for Mrs: Adams, which came with it, was sent to her the day after I received it, and the same day, She called in a carriage at my Office, to inform me of its receipt. Her daughter was with her and in good health. I have not been able to visit her so often as I wished, but before She returns to New York I will try to see her again. I...
I will thank you to tell Mrs. Cranch to give George a couple of teaspoonfuls of Castor oil and to give continue the black powders about three weeks longer repeating the dose of Castor oil at the end of six days Kiss them both for me and believe me dear Madam / your affectionate MHi : Adams Papers.
I left Cambridge yesterday, after having finished my weekly performance, to come here and meet my wife whom I expect hourly here—I received this morning letters from her, dated one at Philadelphia 30. July—and one at New-York 3. August—She was with my Sister, who was well and in good Spirits—She intended to stay over Commencement which was last Wednesday, and then come on as soon as possible—I...
In behalf of the kindest and best of Brothers I thank you my most respected Cousin for your kind attentions at this present time of affliction. I have known sorrow but none has equeall’d this, to be—to be brought to such an humbling situation by one who has always profess’d the most profound friendship is doubly agravating On Monday I thought it was more than human nature could bear,—but he...
I have received your favors of the 5th: & 12th: currt:; the first containing the mournful tidings of the death of our venerable Uncle Quincy; and the latter, by my brother, directing me to procure for you a mourning ring. I hope by the time my brother returns from Washington, to have your commission complied with, but as you gave me no particular directions respecting the fashion of the ring,...
I inclose you a letter from my wife, who would have written you earlier but that George has been very ill with a fever, for several days—He is however, thank God now recovered. I have not written to you so often myself as I ought to have done, the only reason for which has been the ardour with which I have thoughtlessly thrown myself into the vortex of public business—The only object or use of...
It is a long time my Dear Sister, since I have written to you; but I consider it a priviledge that we can think of our Friends, animate our Souls by a view of their useful lives, & refresh ourselves by a retrospect of past scenes, when we cannot find one leisure moment to visit them, or impress our Ideas upon paper.— Ever since Thansgiving we have had one, or other of our Family sick in bed,...
After a pleasant although extremely fatiguing journey we have safely arrived at Mrs. Hellens were we found all the family in good health and spirits Mr. Adams’s health is much improved and he has gain’d flesh on the journey but I much fear that the exercise he takes will prove too much and again reduce him to his former state of debility- My spirits and health have both been very indifferent...
I had flattered myself that before this time we should have had the pleasure of a visit from you, & Miss Smith. It is some time since we have heard one word from Quincy. Be so good as to write & say when it is probable that our wishes may be realized in seeing you. Mrs Sumner left us last Friday; I requested her to call on you. I have a piece of information to give which nearly respects...
I ought long before this to have acknowledged & thanked you for your excellent letter received at Midn., without the pages having been poluted by the inspection of a Demo. your letters as well as conversation are always very interesting to me; & it is a painful thought that in all probability I shall but seldom enjoy the later. If we resided within five or six miles of each other my friend...
I have delay’d answering your very kind letter owing to my Baby’s having been very seriously sick and requiring all my attention during a fortnight. He is now entirely recover’d and has two teeth— I much fear it will be a long time before I shall be permitted to see you as every thing appears to be in such a state of confusion and hostility that it is impossible to form any idea of the time...
It is so long since I have had one hour of leisure that I could appropriate to correspondence with my friends at Quincy and Boston, that I am fearful you will impute to some other cause the length of the interval between my letters—My health however has been gradually improving ever since I left you, and on the whole has been better through the Winter, than for two years before.—A variety of...
We left Washington on the 3d: instt: as I informed you in my letter from that place of the 1st: it was our intention to do—Mr: and Mrs. Johnson and their two youngest daughters accompanied us to Frederick—But Mr: Johnson and my child were both taken so ill on the road that we had some difficulty to complete our day’s journey—Mr. Johnson’s illness detained us a week at Frederick-town, where I...
I grieve to be under the necessity of informing you that I am again to be disappointed of passing next Monday with you at Quincy as the expence of a Carriage is double on account of the celebration of Independance . I shall certainly keep this Anniversary in the full conviction that we are too much the creatures of circumstances to enjoy much of th is e boasted blessing or I should not at this...
I received some days since your kind letter of the 11th: of last month, and was delighted to find you had so far recovered as to be able to write—Since then I have been informed by my brother and Mr: Shaw, that your health continued improving and I sincerely pray to the great disposer of Events that it may be entirely restored and long continued, for your own comfort and the happiness of us...
The solicitude you express’d to have your little Susan learn dancing has induced me to make some inquiries, and has consequently led me to reflect more on the subject than I ever before had done; the result of those inquiries, and these reflections is, a decided opinion against introducing either music or dancing (as an Art) into this little seminary. My daughter will give you my reasons,...
I had the happiness of receiving your excellent letter at Middleton, for which my heart is alive to gratitude. My dear Connexions were thankful for your kind rememberance of them. We returned home last week, & expect to set out for Portsmouth next Mony, when we hope to have the satisfaction of passing some social hours at Your Mansion. Excuse the brevity of this my Dear Friend, as many cares...
I received a few days ago your kind letter of 29 January. After having been so many months without a line from you, it gave me sincere pleasure to see your hand-writing again, though I could not but sympathise with the afflictions under the immediate burden of which it was written—I have cordially and deeply lamented my poor brother, and will obey your injunction respecting his child. I learn...
This morning I had the satisfaction of receiving your kind letter of the 21st: ulto: which partly relieved me from the anxiety occasioned by the letter of a previous date from my brother, mentioning your illness and confinement—The weather has of late been so remarkably fine and mild in this quarter that I hope its benign influence has been extended to your regions, and has restored you...
I am sorry that we are again obliged to postpone our visit to you at Quincy, as George is this day breaking out with the meazles—His symptoms however are favourable, and we hope he will have the disorder lightly—I send out by William the two turkies and a fish. There is no Cod at market, for which reason I send a haddock—You will also receive a Rochefort cheese enclosed in a leaden cover—Of...
I live in that retired manner that affords much time for reflection, which must be my apology for addressing you at this time, as memory has been so kind as to present you very frequently of late as one that has ever taken an interesd in my welfare. And I can say that Friendship has indeed been the Wine of life to me. I feel that you are not indefferent to the happiness of me and my dear...
I hope my Dear Sister has had her Cup of happiness filled, by having an amiable long absent Son, with his wife & little One, sit at her Thanksgiving Table. I have not heard of his return from Washington, but presumed it would be an object with him to be with his beloved Parents upon that Day. I thought of the pleasurable Circle, & sincerely wished myself one of the Affectionate Band, for I...
I have received and thank you for your favor of the 6th: currt. This day, twelve months ago, I left Philadelphia to visit my friends, in N. England, but however strong my inclination to see them often, I must forego that gratification for the sake of bettering my condition here. Should any serious cause occur, such as the yellow fever, (of which we have already had some alarm), which should...
I have received the things you sent me by Townsend and my Aunt Cranch with your letter of this morning and the shirts, for which please to receive my thanks. I find this town so very noisy and the present situation in which I am so very different, on many accounts from any in which I have ever before been, that it will take some time before I shall become naturalized. This circumstance and not...
A few days since, I received your kind favour of 25. ulto: and am greatly rejoyced at the restoration of your health—But I have delayed answering it hitherto, because as the Session draws to a close, we find ourselves more driven for want of time; in addition to which we have had the extraordinary business of trying an impeachment, and I have been in trouble with illness in the family—Both the...
Your letter, Madam, of the 18th. of Aug. has been some days recieved, but a press of business has prevented the acknolegement of it: perhaps indeed I may have already trespassed too far on your attention. With those who wish to think amiss of me, I have learnt to be perfectly indifferent: but where I know a mind to be ingenuous, & to need only truth to set it to rights, I cannot be as passive....
Permit me to introduce to your friendly notice our eldest son & daughter who mean to stay a short time in Boston, and are desirous of paying their respects to you & Mr. Adams. I flatter myself they are virtuous & amiable & that you will not be displeased with them, they have had but few advantages of education beyond what they could find at home. They will not I fear notwithstanding their...
I received two days ago your kind favour of the 3d: instt: and it was very precious as containing information of your health, and that of my father, and friends at Quincy.—I have been and am sensible of the inconvenience there would be in any free interchange of political sentiments upon the passing events, by a correspondence which must pass through the channel of the Post-Office—I believe...