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Inclosed herewith is a statement of the case of the Marquis de Yrujo, which tho’ drawn up for another purpose, and not falling within the range of your official transactions, it may be well for you to possess. No step has since that date, been taken by the Executive in relation to him. He has not as yet manifested any purpose of repairing again to Washington. It seems to be understood that he...
You will have seen by my letter of the 6th. inst. which went by Sundry conveyances, that the bill Suspending the non-intercourse act had passed the House of Representatives. I now enclose it in the form of a law, with an amendment providing for a further Suspension by the Executive in case the State of things between the two countries Should require it. In the Senate the vote for the Bill was...
The triplicate of your communication of Novr. llth. has just been received. Those of Sepr. l2, had been previously received in due time. The turn which the negotiation has taken, was not expected, and excites as much of regret as of disappointment. The conciliatory spirit manifested on both sides, with the apparent consistency of the interest of Great Britain, with the right of the American...
The detention of the Leonidas enables me to inclose a copy of the bill suspending the non-importation act of the last session; as it was passed by the House of Representatives this day with only five dissenting voices. In the object the House is supposed to have been unanimous, the difference of opinion being produced by a disagreement about the time to which the suspension should be limitted....
My letter of 20th. July made you acquainted with the irregularities committed by British ships of War in and adjoining the harbour of New York, and with the correspondence which had ensued between Mr Merry and myself. I now add copies of the letters which have since passed between us on that subject; with copies of documents since received relating to the same or to subsequent violations of...
In my letter of 15th. May I transmitted you a statement of the misconduct of three British ships of War near the port of New York and particularly of the Frigate Leander, commmanded by Captain Whitby. Mr. Merry has since shewn me a letter from Mr. Fox written before any official communication had been received by him respecting the conduct of Captain Whitby, in which, referring to the...
Since my last of 23 April I have received your several letters of 28 February, and March 11th. This will be put into the hands of Mr Pinckney, whose appointment jointly with you by a Commission Extraordinary has been already communicated, and who proceeds to London with the powers and instructions for carrying the joint Commission into effect. This you will find embraces a larger field of...
On reciept of your letter of June 11. in answer to mine of June 3. I wrote to mr King our minister at the court of London, a letter, the copy of which I now inclose you. I trusted we had then time enough to have recieved an answer before the ensuing meeting of the legislature of Virginia. but he probably left England on a visit to the continent a little before the reciept of that letter. as...
You will be herewith furnished with a joint Commission to treat with His Catholic Majesty, and with a letter of credence to him. For the object of the Commission and as a guide to your negotiations, I refer you to the instructions given in relation to the French Government. Whatever portion of the arrangements contemplated may be found to depend not on the French, but on the Spanish...
The President having this day coplied with the recommendation in your letter of Septr. 12. by a special message to Congress on the subject of the non-importation act of the last Session, I lose not a moment in forwarding to Mr. Merry’s care the inclosed copy. Hoping that it will either find him still at Alexandria, or overtake him before the Vessel gets out of reach. I remain with great...
Under the 3d Article of the Treaty of 1794, as it has been expounded, Indian Traders on each side have a right to resort to and trade with the Tribes within the limits of the other party; with an exception of the Country covered by the charter of the Hudson’s Bay company. This article is found in its operation to be very seriously detrimental to the United States. 1st It gives to the British...
The enclosed papers, respecting the practices of British traders with the Indians, to instigate them against the United States, were received through General Wilkinson. They exemplify so strikingly the inconvenience of the intercourse with the Indians as it is now established by the treaty, that I have thought them a necessary supplement to my letter of the 30 May last. I have the honor to be,...
In my last letter of 26. I enclosed you a copy of one from Mr. Erskine communicating the British order of Jany 7th., and of my answer. Occurring circumstances and further reflection on that extraordinary measure, produced a return to the subject; and another letter was added to the first answer. A copy is inclosed, with the same view which led to the last inclosure. The more this order is...
Since the instructions given you on the 15th of April last, further views have been obtained with respect to the interior of Louisiana and the value which Spain will probably put on such a limitation of our settlements beyond the Mississippi as will keep them for some time at a distance from hers. The President has accordingly become the more anxious that in the adjustment authorized by those...
terms precarious, and merchants know not what articles will be admitted into the Islands from day to day. never open in war more than 6. months & then only for articles of first necessity. If goods not admitted permission to carry them away all american articles to be admit ted Flour, fish, corn, tobo. boards plank timbers, Staves, shingles, heading, beef, pork, dried & pickled fish, beans...
You will have seen by my letter of the 6th. which went by sundry other conveyances, that the Bill suspending the non importation act had passed the House of Representatives. I now inclose it in the form of a law, with an amendment providing for a further suspension by the Executive in case the state of things between the two Countries should require it. In the Senate the vote for the Bill was...
Your dispatch of the 11th. of Sepr. has been duly received. Altho’ the tenor of the discussions which it recites does not exhibit on the part of the British Commissioners the readiness in yielding to the justice of our claims and to the energy of your statements, which might be wished, yet the general spirit of conciliation with which they profess and appear to have met you, cherishes a hope...
Your dispatch of Jany. 3d. with the Treaty signed Decr 31 with the British Commissioners, were safely delivered on the 15th. inst. Your letter of Decr. 27, notifying the approach of that event, had been previously received, in time to be included in a communication of the President to Congress then in Session. A copy of the instrument in its actual form, with the declaration of the British...
I herewith inclose a Commission and letters of Credence authorizing you to treat with the British Government concerning the maritime wrongs which have been committed, and the regulation of Commerce and navigation, between the parties. Your authority is made several as well as joint, as a provision for any contingency depriving either of the co-operation of the other. The importance of the...
Your letter of April 25th. inclosing the British project of a Convention of limits, and your proposed amendments, has been duly received. The following observations explain the terms on which the President authorizes you to close and sign the instrument. lst. The modification of the 5th. Art. (noted as one which the British Commissioners would have agreed to) may be admitted, in case that...
Mr George W. Murray, whose cargo shipped on board of the Active of Philada was condemned in January last, by the Judge of the Vice Admiralty at Antigua, considering the condemnation as particularly oppressive, has requested that his case might be recommended to your patronage. It seems, that a residence he formerly had in France, for a particular purpose, was considered by the Court of...
I have left the inclosed open for your inspection and beg the favor of you to forward it by some safe conveyance, if you have not in the mean while been apprized of Mr. Harris’s having received a duplicate. I have the honor to be &c DNA : RG 59—IM—Instructions to Ministers.
The case committed to the care of Mr. Erving in the inclosed letter (which I beg you to hand to him) being marked with very peculiar circumstances, I have thought it expedient also to request your advice to him and even your own direct interposition if you are encouraged to expect a suitable effect from it. Mr. McElwee, the father of the impressed young man, feeling with just sensibility the...
21 June 1805, Department of State. “I have the honor to inclose an extract of a letter I have had occasion to write to Genl Armstrong containing some supplementary observations on the controversy with Spain, not comprehended in my letter to you of the 23d May which was forwarded to Madrid. “I also forward some private letters by this opportunity of a gentleman going from Alexandria.” Letterbook...
The enclosed Sketch, from the pen of Mr. Crowninshield, contains such pertinent and valuable information respecting the trade to India, as to induce an attempt, though late, to convey it to you. I have the honor to be, Gentlemen, with great respect & consideration, Your most obed. Servt. DLC .
My letter of March 18th. acknowledged the receipt of your dispatches and of the Treaty signed on the 31st. of December, of which Mr Purviance was the bearer, and signified that the sentiments and views of the President formed on the actual posture of our affairs with Great Britain, would without any needless delay, be communicated. The subject is accordingly resumed, in this dispatch, with...