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Mr. Gallatin having requested that letters might be written to the Governors for militia aid to his Collectors, I, without reflection, wrote the inclosed in my own name. but on consideration it seems more proper that it should go from yourself. the ideas I had expressed are those I supposed proper, you will make such alterations as you may think better. in general it may be easily accomodated...
I suppose that in answering Govr. Drayton we should compliment his ardor, & smooth over our non-compliance with his request; that he might be told that the President sees, in his present application a proof of his vigilance & zeal in whatever concerns the public safety, and will count with the more confidence on his future attentions & energy whenever circumstances shall call for them. that he...
I have read with pleasure the letter of Capt Davidson by which, according to unanimous resolves of the company of light infantry of the first legion of the militia of Columbi a commanded by him, he tenders their services as volunteers under the act of Congress of Feb. 24. 1807 I accept the offer and render to Capt. Davidson & the other officers & privates of the company that praise to which...
Will you be so good as to consider the inclosed answer to the Little Turtle, & suggest any necessary alterations, & return it to me.—I believe you have not returned me the rough draught for the Beaver. if the copies can be made out tomorrow, we may meet the Indians the next day. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have prepared the two principal answers to the Indians, & pray you to read them attentively & to suggest any alterations you would advise. in that to the Poughtewatamy, it is difficult to go exactly as far in restraining him as we can without committing ourselves absolutely to oppose force, which we must not do. I do not think I yet understand sufficiently the evidence against the claim of...
I shall be ready to recieve any of the Indians tomorrow. I send you a sketch of the answer I propose to the Chippoway, for correction. I suppose he will deliver his speech in his own tongue, and that I may give the answer at the same time, if he introduces no new matter. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I inclose you a charge by mr Hanson against Capt Smith & Lieutenants Davis & Dobbins of the militia, as having become members of an organized company, calling themselves the Tar-company, avowing their object to be the tarring & feathering citizens of some description. altho in ordinary cases the animadversions of the law may be properly relied on to prevent what is unlawful, yet with those...
Th: Jefferson requests the favor of Genl: & Mrs. Dearborn & Mr. Wingate to dine with him on Monday the 17th: at half after three, The favor of an answer is asked. Privately owned.
Extract of a letter from Mr. John Sibley dated Natchitoches Octr. 12. 1808. Every thing in this quarter is quiet. the Season is healthy and very great crops of every thing. No occurrence amongst the Indians worthy of notice. Every body wishes the Embargo raised; but not untill the object for which it was layed is affected; or it is found insufficient to affect it. The late events in Spain seem...
The inclosed papers were recd. at Monticello, a little before I left it & were put by to be communicated to you here; but were in fact left there by mistake. I have just recieved & now communicate them. Affectte. salutns. PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
Genl. Dearborne be so good as to read the inclosed and decide on what is best, returning the papers to mr Gallatin with whom it may be useful perhaps for him to confer PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
I inclose for your consideration several applications for military commissions. the recommendations of Doctr. Macaulay are very strong. he called on me, and one cannot help being influenced somewhat by the appearance of a man. he is quite a well looking subject, but not too much so for a Captain . altho’ a majority is mentioned, I presume less will be accepted. There is no man in South...
Yours of Aug. 18. is this moment recieved, & I forward you a letter of July 16. from Govr. Lewis from which you will percieve that the cloud between us, the Iowas, Foxes & Sacs is cleared up. he says nothing of the Osages; but I presume their enemies have taken advantage of the withdrawing our protection from them. should you not have issued orders for the 100,000 men, I believe it may rest...
Yours of Aug. 15. was recieved yesterday. I regret extremely that the estimate of the blocks at N. York should place them above our appropriation. the data of calculation should be above all question to justify suspending the operation. but, if they are to cost a million, altho’ I should be for it, yet Congress should be consulted.   I inclose you a letter from George Mosley wishing to be a...
In my letter of yesterday I omitted to inclose that of Hern, which I now do. I add to it a newspaper from St. Louis, in which is an account of the surrender of some Indian murderers. this paper says there were 3. or 4. whites murdered, but I think Govr. Lewis’s letter says but 1. on that ground I wrote to him to recommend, if they should be convicted, to suffer only one to be executed, unless...
In my letter of the 15th. I informed you that I had authorised Govr. Tompkins to order out such aids of militia on lake Ontario & the Canada line as he should find necessary to enforce the embargo, not exceeding 500. he proposing to repair thither himself to select trusty persons. I am now to request that you will have measures taken for their pay, subsistence & whatever else is requisite. I...
I inclose you a letter of July 1. from Govr. Lewis recieved from the war office by the last post. It presents a full, & not a pleasant view of our Indian affairs West of the Misipi. as the punishment of the Osages has been thought necessary, the means employed appear judicious. first to draw off the friendly part of the nation, & then withdrawing the protection of the US. leave the other...
I inclose you letters from McLure & Keteltas, asking military appointment, also one recieved from your office from Govr. Hull. official information of continued acts of forcible & insurrectionary opposition to the embargo law on the Canada line, & a letter to that effect from Govr. Tomkins, have obliged me to authorise him to call out detachments of his militia. as he will go to the spot...
Yours of July 27. has been recieved. I now inclose you the letters of Hawkins, Harrison, Wells, Hull & Claiborne recieved from the war office, and, as I conjecture, not yet seen by you. Indian appearances, both in the North West & South are well. beyond the Missisipi they are not so favorable. I fear Governor Lewis has been too prompt in committing us with the Osages so far as to oblige us to...
Yours of July 27. is recieved. It confirms the accounts we recieve from others that the infractions of the embargo in Maine & Massachusets are. open. I have removed Pope of New Bedford for worse than negligence. the Collector of Sullivan is on the totter. the Tories of Boston openly threaten insurrection if their importation of flour is stopped. the next post will stop it. I fear your governor...
A complaint has come to me indirectly on the part of the Cadets at West point, that the promotions in their corps are made on other principles than those of seniority or merit. they do not charge Colo. Williams with an unjust selection by himself, but with leaving the selection to his lieutenant, whose declaration that it was so left to him, they say can be proved. it is stated particularly...
I inclose you a letter from the Path-killer & others of the Cherokees, the object of which I do not precisely see. I suppose they are of Van’s party. the sentiments are unquestionably those of a white man. Sibley’s letters present a disagreeable view. it will be troublesome if we are once compelled to use acts of force against those people. it is the more difficult as we should have to pursue...
I send you a recommendation from the Senate of Georgia in favor of a David Alexander to be a brigade inspector or adjutant General. the writer signs himself President pro tem of the Senate of Georgia, & sais it is a concurred resolution of their General assembly & under the injunction of secrecy. the channel of recommendation is novel, & not to be approved as an habitual one; yet out of...
Th: Jefferson incloses to Genl. Dearborne a letter to be noticed or not as he thinks proper, with his affectionate salutations. PHi : Daniel Parker Papers.
The enclosed papers will explain to you the motives of this address—I deemed it improper to say any thing of my Accounts, while the opinion of the Court of Enquiry was unknown—This was not published before the 4th July, since which I have, with exception of three or four Days, been confined to my Room, and thus it happened I could not see you before your departure The first day I was able to...
I had written to Governor Claiborne according to what had been agreed between you & myself after which I recieved a letter from Pitot on behalf of the canal company of NO. which should have accompanied the printed report I communicated to you. the letter agrees with the report and asks specifically that we should either lend them 50,000. D. or buy the remaining fourth part of their shares now...
Could you, through any friend at Boston or elsewhere have a kental of good-dumbfish forwarded for me to Messrs. Gibson & Jefferson of Richmond, with as little delay as possible, as it is for use on my return to Monticello? it would oblige me much. mr Crownenshield used to do me that kindness. affectionate salutations [ Reply by Dearborn :] Sir, I have written to a gentleman in Boston, who will...
Th: Jefferson, with his affectionate salutations to Genl. Dearborne, incloses him the application of a mr Blount for military appointment, to take it’s stand among competitors in cases of resignation. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I inclose you information from Genl. Jackson which I presume you have otherwise recieved of an outrage committed by the Creeks. altho’ Hawkins will probably give us an account of it yet I presume you will think it necessary to make enquiries of him respecting it. as I shall leave this in 10. or 12. days for Washington, I have desired that no more letters may be forwarded from the post office...
There is a subject on which I wished to speak with you before I left Washington; but an apt occasion did not occur. it is that of your continuance in office. perhaps it is as well to submit my thoughts to you by letter. the present summer is too important, in point of preparation, to leave your department unfilled, for any time, as I once thought might be done: and it would be with extreme...
The inclosed is the first intimation I have recieved of the intention of the paymaster to resign. if it be within rule to appoint to that office a person not in the military line, there is certainly no better man than Robert Brent. but of this also there is no better judge than yourself, to whom accordingly it is submitted with affectionate salutations & assurances of respect. PHi : Daniel...
Your’s of the 14th. came to hand yesterday. I do not see that we can avoid agreeing to estimates made by worthy men of our own choice for the sites of fortifications, or that we could leave an important place undefended because too much is asked for the site. and therefore we must pay what the sites at Boston have been valued at. at the same time I do not know on what principles of reasoning...
Yours of the 12th. was recieved last night. I presume we must employ Herbaugh at N. Orleans, on the recommendation of others, not knowing him ourselves. the sooner he goes the better. You will be so good as to use your own discretion as to the sending a vessel to Passamaquoddy. the special license is not signed by me: and as I do not know the particular course pursued, I have requested mr...
My journey & two days detention on the road by high waters gave me time to reflect on our Canal at New Orleans, on which I will therefore hazard some thoughts. I think it has been said that the Misipi at low water is many feet lower, opposite N.O. than lake Pontchartrain. but the fact is impossible, being in contradiction to the laws of nature. two beds of dead water connected with the same...
Th: Jefferson will thank Genl Dearborne to consider the inclosed. the writer appears to have that sincere enthusiasm for his undertaking which will ensure success. the education of the common people around Detroit is a most desirable object, and the proposition of extending their views to the teaching the Indian boys & girls to read & write, agriculture & mechanic trades to the former,...
Th: Jefferson asks a consultation with the heads of Departments tomorrow at one Oclock & that they will do him the favor to dine with him— Privately owned.
Not discouraged, that I did not, recieve an answer to the letter I presumed to write to you, recommending Mr Neal, as a proper person for the appointment of Surveyor of the Coast of the United States; because I have been assured it is the Course of business, at head quarters, not to reply to Such letters; therefore, presuming Still on the Strength of the Sentiment, produced by the recollection...
Has Genl. Dearborne recieved any information from Genl. Clinton which will enable Th:J. to answer the inclosed letter [ Reply by Dearborn :] Govr. Clinton speaks well of Astor, as a man of large property & fair charactor, and well acquainted with the fur & peltry business. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Should we take any notice of these declarations of the St. Regis Indians? St. Regis or the head of the lake St. Francis seems to be the point where, if a site could be found favorable we should place our extreme post. [ Reply by Dearborn :] Sir, may it not be advisable to request Mr. Sailly to hold friendly intercourse with such of the St. Regis Chiefs as may be inclined to [visit] him...
The Delaware Tribe have determined to remove the ensuing Spring from their present habitations to Settle on the West Side of the Mississippi—Their particular destination is White River to which they Say they have been invited by the Indians of that Country. I can See no injury that will result to the United States from this removal, on the Contrary it will leave vacant a fine tract of Country...
Your letter of Dec. 29. brings to my mind a subject which never has presented itself but with great pain, that of your withdrawing from the administration, before I withdraw myself. it would have been to me the greatest of consolations to have gone thro’ my term with the same coadjutors, and to have shared with them the merit, or demerit, of whatever good or evil we may have done. the...
The answer to M. de la Croix is obviously that it is premature to say any thing about appoint[ment] to an army as yet. but I have thought it not amiss to comm[unic]ate to you his letter, as it may be worth while to enquire in what way he can be used, if in any way. perhaps he may be an engineer. but how I shall return his certificate I know not, as he has given no date of time or place to his...
There seems to be a disposition to take up the classification bill. I have substituted a division of the classes into sections according to their ages instead of the Nos. from 1. to 10. which I think will have a happier effect, & produce several advantages. it is in fact Bonaparte’s plan. I inclose it for your examination & correction. It is exactly the same as the former one, except as to the...
I have reflected on the case of the embodying of the militia in Ohio, and think the respect we owe to the state may overweigh the disapprobation so justly due to the conduct of their Governor pro tem. they certainly had great merit, and have acquired a very general favor thro’ the union, for the early & vigorous blows by which they crushed the insurrection of Burr. we have now again to appeal...
Will you write to Govr. Cabell or the proper officer & give the orders for the discharge of the militia & measures to be taken thereon. will you also give orders to Capt. McComb at Charleston to attend mr Doyley’s experiment, & indeed to try the experiment at the public expence. I have written to Doyley that you would give such orders. as his plan is to set fire to sails & rigging, I presume...
I forwarded to mr Smith, Secretary of the Navy, an extract of so much of my letter to you of Aug. 31. as suggested the idea of artificial harbours for gun boats on the Horse shoe & Middle grounds, with a view to his having their foundation examined to know if they would support works, & their distance ascertained to know what would be their effect. the objects were 1st. to provide an asylum on...
The Chevalr. de Foranda has stated in a letter to the Dept. of State, that one thousand dollars having been advanced by Don. H. Salcedo, to Lt. Pike during his late expedition, he requests that the reimbursement may be placed at his disposal. The President gives his sanction to the measure, with an intimation that it be referred to your department for execution. Will you be so obliging as to...
I inclose you the letters of mr Granger & mr J. Nicholas, by the latter of which you will see that an Indian rupture in the neighborhood of Detroit becomes more probable if it has not already taken place. I see in it no cause for changing the opinion given in mine of Aug. 28. but on the contrary strong reason for hastening the measures therein recommended. we must make ever memorable examples...
My letter of Aug. 28. on the dispositions of the Indians was to go the rounds of all our brethren, & to be finally sent to you with their separate opinions. I think it probable therefore that the inclosed extract of a letter from a priest at Detroit to Bishop Carroll may reach you as soon or sooner than that. I therefore forward it, because it throws rather a different light on the...
Mr. Madison will have written to you on the subject of a demand of 1000. D. furnished to Lieutt. Pike to be repaid to Foronda, which of course must come out of the military fund. I inclose you an application from mr Graham for a commission in the army for a mr Lithgow, relation of mr Henderson who sollicits it, & who I think has a just claim for the gratification. I inclose you also a letter...