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I thank you for your kind attention to my affairs, as detailed in your last Letter which I have received within these two days— I confide entirely in your judgment and discretion, and shall approve of any arrangements you shall make for the present disposal of my farm— R. Dexter holds or held a note from me of a little more than three hundred dollars—I left a request with Shaw to pay it as...
I begin by congratulating you upon the birth of your daughter Elizabeth, of which I had never heard, untill I received your letter of 19th: ulto: although we had been three or four weeks in daily expectation of receiving the news, and as this is intelligence of peculiar interest to the Ladies, there was scarcely a day pass’d, but upon my return home, my wife’s enquiries were, of advices from...
I am indebted to you, I believe for two letters; but there is so much in the last, of what parson Gardner in one of his Sermons said was called in the barbarous jargon of modern times quizzing , that I hardly know how to answer it at-all—For the use or abuse of my name in the newspapers, whether from friend or foe, in good or in evil I hope I shall not be held accountable—Neither do I suppose...
Your’s of the 3d: instt: came to hand the night before last; I am perfectly satisfied with your sales of my wood—I had a little kindness for the grove in the rear of the brook, and if circumstances should carry me back to the house of our nativity, shall miss the prospect which it furnished; but your reasons for disposing of it are substantial, and I suppose a young growth will come up,...
I have two letters from you of the 18th: and 28th: of last Month to answer—And since the receipt of the last have also received from Shaw, a copy of Selfridge’s trial—It corresponds very accurately with your abridgement, excepting only the Article of Mr. Dexter’s argument with which I confess I have been much disappointed—It is professedly much compress’d in the printed trial, from what it was...
I received a few days since your favour of the 28th. ulto: with the very interesting account of Selfridge’s trial—A subject upon which there has been much curiosity here; though we had heard nothing of the trial except the short paragraphs in the newspapers.—It has confirmed me in an opinion which I have long since entertained, that for our real security, in the protection of person, property,...
On new year’s day I received your very agreeable Letter of Decr: 21st: which I should have answered immediately; but it was not sitting day; and I find no time for my correspondence but while we are in Session—The reason of which is that having become a Jack of so many trades, I employ all the time I have to spare at home , in preparing for my bussiness at Cambridge next Spring—I have...
I have received two letters from you, since I wrote you last; but I presume you will know the reason which has prevented me from answering the first of them before the coming of the last.—As the Session advanced the business to which my attention became necessary accumulated so much that I had scarcely time to go home and come to the Capitol from day to day—And besides all the subjects which...
Your favour of the 2d. instt: enclosing a copy of the judiciary Bill which was before you for consideration came to hand some days since—As your legislative occupations employ you only three hours a day, I can readily conceive that you can find little time for private correspondence; for as an Antient Orator was wont to say that he had not time to make his speech short, so I have often found...
Your favour of the 19th: of last Month, has been several days in my hands.—I have enclosed you the two sheets which were wanting to complete your files of the Journals of the House, but I cannot find a spare copy of the first sheet of the Senate’s Journals—I send most of the public documents to Shaw, because he wants them more than you, and because you will always have the first perusal of...
Your letter closing the last and commencing the present year, has been several days in my hands, and has hitherto remained without reply, from a variety of causes; but the want of time has been the principal one. Business is thickening upon us very fast, and notwithstanding your injunction to me at the time when I was getting into the Carriage to come here, I have not been able to keep myself...
We have so little business on hand that it was not thought necessary to commence the year with a Session for transacting it; and this morning we have adjourned for the purpose of letting the Tunisian Minister come and pay us a visit; I cannot employ the leisure of the moment better than in answering your letter of the 15th: and 16th: of last Month. Your opinion of the Message will probably not...
Your letter of the 4th: instt: came to hand two days ago—But I have no information of a public nature to communicate, which may render it worth your while to peruse an answer—We are all very full of sound and fury against the foreign Nations from whom we have received such violent outrages; but having two of them upon our hands at once, we shall be very cautious about engaging in the contest...
I wrote to my mother from Providence & New-York, giving her an Account of our progress thus far; but the moment one sets one’s foot into Philadelphia, the Squire becomes such a standing topic of enquiry from all quarters, that it never fails to remind me of the duty of remembrance to him. We left New-York in the Diligence Stage on Monday Morning, and arrived here the next day just at...
a week or two past we had your Marriage announced in our news papers and I have been congratulated upon it by many of your friends, and I confess have been waiting ever since for a communication from yourself, to offer my congratulations to you, upon an event that I most cordially wish and expect will be productive of your happiness permit me to present myself to my new sister through your...
It is so long since I gave my father notice of the time when we intended to take our departure from Washington, and of course expected to greet you at Quincy, that I am apprehensive you will begin to feel some anxiety on our Account—I have therefore determined to write you this line, though I hope to treat so close upon the heels of my Epistle, as to be with you by the time, it has performed...
I have two or three letters from you which I am afraid will never be answered in the manner all your letters deserve to be answered; but I know you will make all the proper allowances for my situation, and the shortness of my Time.—There is however a question or two which I can no longer delay to answer.—And first; respecting the enlargement of the Meeting-House, I have to say that I cannot...
Your letter of the 2d: has been duly received, and has contributed with those of your father received at the same time to cheer my mind, which every thing of a political nature around me struggles very hard to depress—Hitherto since my arrival here, I have thank Heaven enjoyed much domestic comfort from the health of my wife and children—this has been more favourable than I ever knew before,...
Yours of the 14th: came to hand Saturday Evening—24th: I suppose you were not inconsolable at the loss of your election, and that your expectations had not been raised very high of a different issue—As to the electoral Ticket, I am certainly not one of those who can say I told you so—Nor am I one of those who can say I am not sorry for it—But I do not think crimination against any body can be...
Under another cover, I enclose to you the documents laid on our table this morning— I have not yet had a line from you; but received a letter a few days since from your father, and one since from Shaw—The issue of your elections for the electoral Ticket, appears to be ascertained—and shows that the federalists will be relieved from the embarrassment of fixing upon their Candidate—It is...
I have sent you under another cover, a copy of the President’s Message, with the documents, and the Journals of both Houses—We have hitherto done nothing, and this week being destined to horse-racing, will of course be passed in doing more nothing. This morning came a Message, with nominations for appointments; consisting only of those which have been made during the recess—The only one...
We have reflected some our dispute in regard to damage done your estate in medford. We wish you to consider before you come to town how far a proposition of this nature would claim your attention. We have about Six acres purched from Russells Estate & Joining yours; apart of which might be received in exchange for what we take from you; and a reasonable Sum be paid for removing the house over...
An attempt was made this morning to postpone the adjournment for two days—from the 26th: (Monday next) to Wednesday the 28th:—The motion however was rejected—Next came a motion to meet to-morrow. yeas 3. nays about 20.—The motion to protract, will probably be renewed on Monday; but I believe without success. A bill has pass’d the Senate, the object of which is to abandon the further building...
Know all Men by these Presents. That I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and State of Massachusetts Esquire, in consideration of the natural affection which I bear for my Son Thomas Boylston Adams of Quincy aforesaid Esquire, do hereby give, grant, and convey unto the said Thomas Boylston Adams, his heirs and assigns forever, a certain piece of sedgebanks, lying in said Quincy, in...
The Louisiana Government bill has this day pass’d, yeas 20. Nays 5.—It now goes to the House of Representatives, where we shall see what will be done with it.—On the final question this day taken I alone spoke against it, and was answered only by one member—He saw no Constitutional objection—because the clause authorizing Congress to make needful rules and regulations for the territory, and...
I send this day a packet to your father containing the Journals and other publications of the day; with an Intelligencer, containing the account of our festival on Friday last.—That is to say, of the dinner—To morrow evening there is to be a Ball for the same purpose. One of the toasts drank at the feasts was “ An Union of Parties ,” which is like drinking the Millennium—I suppose they will...
We have this day a sort of Holiday, to rejoyce for the acquisition of our new Territories—The Members of Congress of both Houses are to dine together— The federalists who opposed the cession however do not join in the party—Those of us who approved the measure, are to be of the feast—where we at least shall find not much congeniality. You will find in the inclosed papers numerous and very...
I do not take the Washington Federalist; and it is now in general so poorly conducted as hardly to be worth sending you if I did—But I sent you some time since one of its numbers, and will send you others if they should contain any thing interesting to the fire-side . I can also inclose to you the Intelligencer which contains a pretty good report of the debates in the House— Those in the...
The Louisiana revenue bill (of which I sent you some time since a copy) has this day pass’d the third reading in the Senate—But with various amendments so that it must go back to the House of Representatives, where it will probably pass on Monday. The first section has been altered in point of form, and made as I conceive more vague and uncertain than it was at first—In thirty-five days from...
I am happy to find by your letter of the 15th: instant that you had reached Quincy; and your determinations respecting your future course are so conformable to what I think prudence and your best interest that it gives me great pleasure to find you have taken them. In preserving an appearance of adhering to the profession of the Law, I would not suffer it to affect my feelings or my Spirits....